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Old December 24, 2016, 08:50 AM   #26
Brit
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Does stippling a gun add or decrease value for resale?

As I have never sold one of my Glock's, it matters not.

I met Gaston Glock, in 1984 in The Royal York Hotel in Toronto. One of the subjects of our conversation, was the smooth finish on the Glock 17 (we had bought the first 10 17s, direct from Austria to come into North America) our little gun company was called Practical Pistols Inc. Long gone.

Back to the too smooth finish, according to me! Gaston stated that the Police and Military testers liked it!
Then the Gen 4 finish came out? Exactly as I requested it, in 1984! By far the best none slip finish to date. IMHO. Carry mine every day.

A word to the wise, with the rise of ISIS Thank you Obama. And the lone wolf attacks all over the world, carry every day, and what we used to call Hi Cap capacity, at least 15 round magazines in your carry pistol.

The driving a vehicle into a crowd, and shooting, or stabbing by the Lone Wolf driver, the new norm, expect that coming to a Town near you, any time soon!

Stay aware, and armed.
Something we can do, the German and French Citizens can not do!

Merry Christmas all.
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Old December 29, 2016, 06:14 PM   #27
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Nobody wants to buy a gun with a jimmed up frame.
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Old December 30, 2016, 11:47 AM   #28
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I would not touch anything that could not be put back in original configuration. Most $1000 custom jobs is worth -$300 to me.

Back in the 90's I saw an ad in the paper for a ZX-10 Kawasaki, called the guy and asked him if it was still in factory stock condition. Of course, 100%, he replied. When I showed up, it had a loud pipe, crappy custom seat and non original windshield. I told him "thank you for wasting my time". But it is stock, I bought it like that, was his excuse!
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Old December 30, 2016, 01:55 PM   #29
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Stippling decreases value. Having said that, the polymer Glock frames are easy to get and are cheap. I think you can get them for about $150.
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Old December 30, 2016, 03:27 PM   #30
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I doubt that stippling does MUCH to change the price of used weapon.

It might decrease the number of potential buyers, but the seller will probably get the same price as an unmodified gun -- unless the stipling is poorly done.
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Old December 30, 2016, 03:59 PM   #31
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Stippling the grips, color filling the lettering, ceracoating, etc, etc all take away from a gun's value. (have you ever tried to get rid of color filling?) I'm not a collector so if I do choose to personalize one of my firearms, I really don't care if impacts the piece's vqalue or not. After all, stippling a Glock is not as though you are ruining a 150 year old Colt revolver.

I am guilty of removing the lawyer banner from my Ruger Vaquero's barrel and bisleyizing the trigger. So now this maybe $500 gun is only worth $400.

Big deal !!!!!
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Old December 30, 2016, 04:10 PM   #32
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It matters not. Stippling is to increase tactical ductility for operations. It's worth it. I see there are some lazer beam stippling options these days.
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Old December 30, 2016, 04:45 PM   #33
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"A word to the wise, with the rise of ISIS Thank you Obama"
And then you invoke a Christian religious reference when talking about violence...

What? What planet are you from?
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Old December 30, 2016, 07:47 PM   #34
Walt Sherrill
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(have you ever tried to get rid of color filling?)
Some solvents get that stuff out pretty easily. Or a little heat.

I don't generally pay extra for modifications, but their presence doesn't always turn me off or give me an urge to haggle for a much lower price. If the mods are functional and done well, etc. I might even like them.

About the only thing I'll pay extra for is mags, if they're in good shape and cheaper than their replacements. A good holster might be worth some extra $$ if I don't already have one that works and I like it's design.

Holsters usually come as a freebie -- because the seller no longer needs it. (I've picked up some very valuable holsters in purchases that way, that I later sold for much more on EBAY than I expected to get!)

Last edited by Walt Sherrill; December 30, 2016 at 07:54 PM.
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Old January 2, 2017, 12:20 PM   #35
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Decrease for me---actually I would NEVER buy it----don't want anything Bubba screwed up with a soldering iron.
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Old January 2, 2017, 12:47 PM   #36
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Alters originality -- decreases value.

.02. David.
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Old January 2, 2017, 03:28 PM   #37
Walt Sherrill
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Alters originality -- decreases value.
So, if someone rips off crappy plastic Glock sights and installs better metal adjustable or night sights, and then offers the gun for sale, it's resale value is less than if he had left the factory sights on the gun?

I'll agree that the gun's value may not be increased -- but decreased?
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Old January 2, 2017, 04:14 PM   #38
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Guns are valued IME based on 2 main things.....

Case #1: Adherence to an original standard...often determined by amount of original finish remaining and the specific model it was originally.....and how rare/great that model is considered right now.


Case #2: Other guns know as shooters are valued by their ability to perform a task. This task may be competition, a beauty contest, daily carry, etc.


If we talk specifically stippling on a current general model Glock/M&P/etc, it has no added value for case #1. It is just new value minus X for use. If it is correctly stippled, it gets some added value under case#2.

You guys talking about bubba'd work are right....it loses value as a shooter or an original. I can't believe all textured plastic guns are trashed. Some/many likely have increased shooting performance! That is why owners staple guns, right?
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Old January 2, 2017, 04:22 PM   #39
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That is why owners staple guns, right?
Thats why I stipple mine.

I still have to wonder about all the nay sayers, if they have ever shot a gun thats been stippled and felt the difference in the way they handle.

I try to keep mine pretty simple, and prefer the fine type of stippling. Its give a cats tongue feel and looks kind of velvety to the eye.

This is a sample on my one 17......

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Old January 2, 2017, 04:30 PM   #40
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Yep Nathan - I agree under your rule #2.

Not a real good analogy, but compare stippling to stock checkering:

Checkering a stock can provide both a better grip and eye appeal.
Checkering can also ruin a stock.

My GS is getting up there in age.
He makes custom stocks but quit checkering them
because he says the effort isn't worth the $$$ reward any more.

If y'all were to google "stippling", you'll find lots more examples.
I see some I like, but have no feel for the cost.
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Old January 2, 2017, 04:32 PM   #41
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From Walt S.

Quote:
I doubt that stippling does MUCH to change the price of used weapon.

It might decrease the number of potential buyers, but the seller will probably get the same price as an unmodified gun -- unless the stipling is poorly done.
This is correct. Though I'll point out the stippling (or other mods) can add to the value of a resold gun bringing it closer to the original cost than a simply stock gun. For those that want those mods and are willing to get a used gun.

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Old January 2, 2017, 07:15 PM   #42
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I don't like aftermarket stippling, so always a decrease for me.
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Old January 2, 2017, 08:28 PM   #43
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I would skip one that has aftermarket work unless it came with paperwork showing it came from the manufacturers custom shop.
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Old January 3, 2017, 08:40 AM   #44
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I've always wondered how much (if any) applying heat hot enough to melt Glock plastic adds to the chemical degradation of the polymers the frame is made of. I can only speculate that at some temperature Glock polymers begin to break down. I believe that most soldering irons easily reach temps of 650-700F.
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Old January 3, 2017, 08:51 AM   #45
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I havent seen any problems yet. I have a couple of guns I shoot all the time, that over the past 9 years or so, I stippled and then touched/freshened up the stippling on them a couple of times, as needed, and they have shown no signs of a problem or issue.

Now, other than the initial removing/reshaping of the larger, factory molded, "checkering", Im not bearing down deep into the plastic when I do it. Its more just surface refinishing.

One of those guns has over 100,000 rounds though it too, so its not like its not getting a workout. No signs of cracking or failure yet, and I keep a close watch on them.
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Old January 3, 2017, 09:09 AM   #46
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Quote:
IMO, it reduces market size, but increases value.
If i wanted a stock Glock, stippled by Robar, i would pay extra up front in the used market to get it. If diy, i might pay extra depending on the result.
Agree.

If the stippling/grip-reduction work is professionally well done, and not a bubba-style DIY hack job, your Glock's value as a used gun won't decrease ...

... And you could realize some gain on it as a "used gun" IF you find a buyer who's looking for a stippled Glock (in that caliber), since the total cost - to him - is less than buying a new gun and then sending it off to Robar, or wherever, for the same degree and quality of stippling/reduction work

But on selling guns with some degree of well-done custom work, it's definitely a right-place, right-buyer thing.
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Old January 3, 2017, 09:24 AM   #47
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But on selling guns with some degree of well-done custom work, it's definitely a right-place, right-buyer thing.
Of course. And we all know how things go when it comes time to sell trade/anything, especially if a dealer is involved. What youre selling/trading is basically junk, and they are just being nice just giving you that sub low ball offer.

Of course, the next day, when its in the case, its at or above retail, and a note explaining on it all the "extras" that just the day before, somehow made it worthless.
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Old January 3, 2017, 12:21 PM   #48
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If this were a poll,I'd say it heavily suggests stippling decreases value and market appeal.
Frankly,I'm not a fan. I can see(and accept) the utilitarian value of it.

What is(IMO) ridiculous is the notion that if its done by "GonzoGhuruBlackOps TacWorks) its somehow more acceptable than a labor of love amateur job.

Do you really think"GonzoGhuru"sits around with a woodburning pen actually doing the job you pay him for? He likely has a high school hang around kid do it.
Either A) Someone has odd priorities,or
B) The job stands for itself.
You get to spend your own money your way,but this "Unaltered" stuff gets crazy.A LOT of "out of the box" guns don't work that good.
I read an article about Holland and Holland,the fine,handmade British shotgun.
The H+H spokesman interviewed in the article said the American idea of not "altering" a fine H+H double was BARNCARPET!! Ridiculous!!Anyone who thinks so has no idea what an H+H double is about.
The point is having a fine shotgun built precisely to fit the person who ordered it. The next owner will be different.To truly have an H+H means going to H+H with the shotgun TO HAVE IT ALTERED.

Its bending yourself out of shape to fit the brick that comes out of the box that is ridiculous.
Just do,or have it done,with some skill and pride.
And do it for YOU,not whatever someone else will think
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Old January 3, 2017, 02:40 PM   #49
Walt Sherrill
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HiBC
What is(IMO) ridiculous is the notion that if its done by "GonzoGhuruBlackOps TacWorks) its somehow more acceptable than a labor of love amateur job.

Do you really think"GonzoGhuru"sits around with a woodburning pen actually doing the job you pay him for? He likely has a high school hang around kid do it.

Either A) Someone has odd priorities, or B) The job stands for itself.
One point you made, but not quoted above, I'll agree with: stippling can reduce market appeal. Some folks just don't like it. Others do. For the ones that do, a lack of stippling might also reduce market appeal...

In making your next two point, you've used a debating technique called "Reductio ad absurdum" in which (put simply) you pick extreme examples and ask us to assume they are somehow typical.

Most of us have said, with regard to stippling, it'll depend on how well the work was done. A crappy stippling job might degrade the value of the gun. A good one might not. One by a "big name" firm, beautifully done with proof that they did it, might even get the seller some extra money -- but only if the buyer wants (or doesn't dislike) stippling.

A stippling job done by a big-name gunsmithing firm (like Robar) is likely to look pretty darned good, because the firm's reputation rests on the work they do. That work is typically NOT DONE by a hang-around high school kids (unless they're family members learning the business).

On the other hand, a lot of amateur stippling jobs aren't all that great. They might be OKAY, but nothing to get excited about. A "work of love" done by a talented amateur may be both attractive and functional, but it might not justify a price increase over the standard (un-stippled) price of the same gun, if that's the only change. But someone who wants an "original" gun may not even consider the weapon.

The finished product is what will help the buyer decide, but as has been said more than once, not everybody likes stippling.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HiBC
I read an article about Holland and Holland,the fine,handmade British shotgun.

The H+H spokesman interviewed in the article said the American idea of not "altering" a fine H+H double was BARNCARPET!! Ridiculous!!Anyone who thinks so has no idea what an H+H double is about.

The point is having a fine shotgun built precisely to fit the person who ordered it. The next owner will be different.To truly have an H+H means going to H+H with the shotgun TO HAVE IT ALTERED.
Strange reasoning. Holland and Holland builds custom guns -- "bespoke", I think, is the term used with clothing, but it can be applied to other things, too. Those weapons are built, from scratch, to suit the buyer's tastes and physical requirements (or quirks). Not everybody can afford (or is willing) to fly to London to get changes made if they acquire or inherit a Holland and Holland weapon.

The guns we've been talking about aren't CUSTOM weapons. And applying the standards used when discussing custom guns doesn't seem appropriate here.

That people want or need more than the standard run of the mill product explains why more and more guns increasingly have different grip inserts or grip panels, can have different sights, different length barrels, maybe even different caliber barrels, and why trigger mods are increasingly available, (or come adjustable from the factory), etc. etc. And if the frames aren't polymer, that's also why different types of grips and finishes are available. It's not always about FUNCTION alone, but some of these changes, including stippling, can improve function in some applications.

.

Last edited by Walt Sherrill; January 3, 2017 at 10:51 PM.
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Old January 3, 2017, 03:51 PM   #50
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Okay, ... let's try it this way. Focus, dudenals ..

In the 10mm group pic below, the G20 and G29 both have had the same BTC stippling, grip-reduction, and beavertail work on their frames.

On the slides, barrels, and slide internals, Robar applied their NP3 finish.

Both types of custom work easily qualify as "professionally well-done."

Now, I'm not ready to sell them, ... BUT will that work bring me HUGE bucks if I do decide to sell them in 3 years - like on GunJoker? Or at the local cash-n-carry Gun Show?

Maybe, maybe not ...

It's all about "right-buyer, right-time, right-place."


Last edited by agtman; January 3, 2017 at 10:07 PM.
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