The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > Hogan's Alley > Handguns: The Semi-automatic Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old January 8, 2017, 05:03 AM   #76
kozak6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 16, 2005
Location: AZ
Posts: 2,654
Quote:
Good analogy!! Now,if you made your living using that drill to put in drywall screws all day long,and your handswere less tired or you put in 8% more screws in a day,(stippled)would you care?
And if you bought another drill to drive screws,and the grip was smooth,might you stipple the drill?
Maybe, but I wouldn't pay more for one that some drunken maroon attacked with a soldering iron.

I'd have to get a hell of a deal on that drunken soldering iron job, which is likely.

Aren't we just going in circles here? Or is this thread about done?
kozak6 is offline  
Old January 9, 2017, 09:46 AM   #77
agtman
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 26, 2001
Location: midwest
Posts: 1,307
Quote:
* * * I have also yet to shoot a semi-auto that I found difficult to hold onto though (which I assume is the point of stippling).
What many folks have missed here about stippling, at least when it's done by a reputable custom outfit (in my case, BTC), is that it's almost never done without other ergonomic mods to the frame. So yes, while stippling makes otherwise slick polymer material "grippier," it's typically not the only frame mod done, at least to Glocks.

So on both my 10mm Glocks, BTC eliminated the hump on the backstrap (in the course of doing the stippling work), added a beavertail, and removed material under the trigger guard at the top of the front-strap for a higher purchase. (I also had the option to have the finger-grooves on the front strap removed and that area stippled over, but chose to keep them).

All the work was professionally well-done, and both Glocks now point and handle like 1911s. The humpy, bulky, Glocky frame-girth is gone.

I've kept the work-orders and receipts as documentation, and if I ever go to sell either one of them, I'm confident there's a buyer out there who'll find value in these mods.
agtman is offline  
Old January 9, 2017, 11:08 AM   #78
tipoc
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 11, 2004
Location: Redwood City, Ca.
Posts: 3,082
We are going in circles.

There have been a number of fellas here who have said that because they don't like Glocks and they don't like stippling (or other mods) no doubt stippling will lower the value of the gun at time of resale. Things like this topic are determined by a market that's bigger than one person's opinion.

Ten guys walk into a gunatorium and look at a modified used gun an say "Who butchered that piece?" The 11th person walks in, looks at it and says "That was done by Bill Laughridge! Gen 2. $750. with 4 mags and original box and papers! Let me have that."

tipoc
tipoc is offline  
Old January 10, 2017, 11:39 AM   #79
TailGator
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 8, 2009
Location: Florida
Posts: 2,860
I agree, Tipoc, and with what Walt Sherrill said in post 69. I had been staying out of this thread because it was getting so emotional, but the economic realities, as I see them, are that when you make a permanent modification to a gun you are narrowing your potential buyers from people who want that model to people who want that model with that modification. People in the former group may well want to pay less, but those in the latter may be willing to pay more because they finally found exactly what they want and can get it without going to the trouble of doing the mod themselves or shipping and having their gun away from them while they have it done professionally. The corollary to that, then, is that unless almost universally popular, a modification is likely to produce either a slower sale or a lower price.
TailGator is offline  
Old January 10, 2017, 04:52 PM   #80
tipoc
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 11, 2004
Location: Redwood City, Ca.
Posts: 3,082
Quote:
I agree, Tipoc, and with what Walt Sherrill said in post 69. I had been staying out of this thread because it was getting so emotional, but the economic realities, as I see them, are that when you make a permanent modification to a gun you are narrowing your potential buyers from people who want that model to people who want that model with that modification. People in the former group may well want to pay less, but those in the latter may be willing to pay more because they finally found exactly what they want and can get it without going to the trouble of doing the mod themselves or shipping and having their gun away from them while they have it done professionally. The corollary to that, then, is that unless almost universally popular, a modification is likely to produce either a slower sale or a lower price.
My thinking and experience as well.

tipoc
tipoc is offline  
Old January 11, 2017, 09:22 AM   #81
Skans
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 20, 2008
Posts: 10,322
Quote:
The corollary to that, then, is that unless almost universally popular, a modification is likely to produce either a slower sale or a lower price.
This is true, but with one exception - legal pre-'86 machine gun conversions.
Skans is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:25 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2016 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.14262 seconds with 11 queries