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Old June 5, 2014, 07:24 PM   #1
crushedstang50
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Are they safe to shoot?

So just got into reloading. I made a my first batch of twenty five rounds. I made a mistake.....I thought I had 115 grain bullets but actually had 124 grain.....not a clue what I was thinking. So here is my load info:
124 grain barrys 9mm round nose. Not hollow
Longshot powder at 5 grains
Cci 500 primers
Case length of 1.100

I know I probably should have had the length more like 1.150 but considering only 5 grains are they safe?
Also if anyone has a recipe for the longshot for 9mm and 40 cal I would appreciate it.
Thanks!
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Old June 5, 2014, 08:03 PM   #2
tangolima
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Any doubt, do over. It is the correct habit to develop for a hand loader.

Are you going to shoot them if someone on the forum told you it is safe? It is safe only when you are sure it is safe.

-TL
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Old June 5, 2014, 08:19 PM   #3
PhantomI
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Advice

Use the Winchester reloading data online to check your load. This is from the powder Manufacturer, the data is good. I would not ask a total stranger for advice on a specific load. Use a current reloading manual or the bullet/powder manufacturers web sites if they post data. Most of them do.

Good luck,
Tom

Here is the link:


http://www.wwpowder.com/basic-manual-inquiry.html
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Old June 5, 2014, 08:24 PM   #4
Armed_Chicagoan
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Hodgdon publishes a starting load of 4.8gr and a max of 5.8gr of Longshot for that bullet. But your OAL is a bit short, I'd use an inertia puller to pull the bullet out another 0.05" and you're well within the published data, much closer to the low end.

My $0.02
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Old June 5, 2014, 09:05 PM   #5
crushedstang50
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Ok thanks guys I appreciate it. Glad I only did 25! Just wanted some experienced advice.
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Old June 5, 2014, 09:55 PM   #6
Nick_C_S
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The real concern here is where your head was at when you loaded them. I know you're new to loading. We're human. We all make mistakes. And you discovered your error before your trip to the range - which is good. You put your ego in neutral and called out your mistake (here on TFL) - also good.

Regardless of what you do with your 25 rounds, this is a good learning experience. If I may speak from 30 years' handloading experience: When I decide to load up a batch, I check my mental disposition. I make sure I'm not preoccupied with thoughts of pending bills, chores, obligations, etc. i.e. I make sure my head is at the load bench and nowhere else. I make sure I have time to finish the project I'm about to start. These are the reasons why I usually load at night when the house has calmed down. I don't have a TV in my load room (radio is not as distracting, but I rarely listen to it. It's usually very quiet when I load.). I double check my recipe and components - every time. And I mean every time. If someone interrupts me when I'm loading, I stop. I give them my undivided attention until they leave. Then I double-check where I left off, and proceed. When I'm done, I always clean up my load bench area so it's clean and organized for the next load session.

Good habits and disciplined processes are important. Loading is a rewarding hobby. But mistakes can be costly - and they're easy to make. The best way to avoid them is to have strong disciplined habits.
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Old June 6, 2014, 07:34 AM   #7
Beginner 1960
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+1^ I found out when I 1st started reloading I could have no disrations when I'm loading, to easy to make a mistake.

Give it ur undivided attention
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Old June 6, 2014, 11:24 AM   #8
mikld
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Quote:
I know I probably should have had the length more like 1.150 but considering only 5 grains are they safe?
Also if anyone has a recipe for the longshot for 9mm and 40 cal I would appreciate it.
Thanks!
Where did you get the OAL info? And the powder charge? I'd suggest you get a manual and use the listed OAL for a 124 gr. round nose bullet (either lead or jacketed) as a starting point and determine the OAL for your gun using the "plunk test".

Hodgdon mfgs. the powder so get a Hodgdon manual...
Attached Images
File Type: gif 1plunk test1.gif (38.9 KB, 17 views)
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Old June 6, 2014, 12:05 PM   #9
mboylan
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The issue is if you made that mistake, what other mistakes did you make? There is no room for error in reloading.
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Old June 6, 2014, 12:12 PM   #10
zxcvbob
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The loads should be fine, but you need to pull them anyway. 1) You don't trust them, so you shouldn't shoot them. 2) It builds character; maybe you'll pay attention to what you're doing next time.

BTW, you don't need to deprime the cases to reuse them.

You can also set them aside and work up to that load starting at-or-near a minimum load.
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Old June 6, 2014, 04:01 PM   #11
Nick_C_S
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Quote:
zxcvbob: you need to pull them anyway. 1) You don't trust them, so you shouldn't shoot them. 2) It builds character.
. . . ^^ I like this. ^^

Quote:
You can also set them aside and work up to that load starting at-or-near a minimum load.
Never thought of this. It's only 25 rounds; but still, a good idea.
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Old June 6, 2014, 11:56 PM   #12
RC20
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As good as the advice below is, I have yet to find myself with no distractions.

Maybe optimal but as the world is not optimal I would put it on distractions that are potentially lethal, injuouruss.

If there are distractions you make sure the cross checks catch any problems (or thats my take)

I would not pull the 25 bullets as long as that load is within bounds

As long as the load is ok and not a compressed one even the length is not likely an issue (I have not analyzed the load)



Quote:
The real concern here is where your head was at when you loaded them. I know you're new to loading. We're human. We all make mistakes. And you discovered your error before your trip to the range - which is good. You put your ego in neutral and called out your mistake (here on TFL) - also good.

Regardless of what you do with your 25 rounds, this is a good learning experience. If I may speak from 30 years' handloading experience: When I decide to load up a batch, I check my mental disposition. I make sure I'm not preoccupied with thoughts of pending bills, chores, obligations, etc. i.e. I make sure my head is at the load bench and nowhere else. I make sure I have time to finish the project I'm about to start. These are the reasons why I usually load at night when the house has calmed down. I don't have a TV in my load room (radio is not as distracting, but I rarely listen to it. It's usually very quiet when I load.). I double check my recipe and components - every time. And I mean every time. If someone interrupts me when I'm loading, I stop. I give them my undivided attention until they leave. Then I double-check where I left off, and proceed. When I'm done, I always clean up my load bench area so it's clean and organized for the next load session.

Good habits and disciplined processes are important. Loading is a rewarding hobby. But mistakes can be costly - and they're easy to make. The best way to avoid them is to have strong disciplined habits.
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Old June 7, 2014, 04:09 PM   #13
Unclenick
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The last time I built a bench that gets used for reloading, I covered its surface and the wall behind it with whiteboard. Now when I set up to load there, I just write my load, including the brand and part numbers for the bullet and primer, and the lot number for the powder from my notes before I even start getting supplies out. I then double-check against that dry erase data as I'm setting components out and, especially, when I check the powder measure calibration against the scale. I find it especially handy when rolling different test loads of similar external appearance, to be able to write on the bench surface itself, which box or box cavities get which loads. I check against that when labeling the boxes.
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