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Old April 15, 2014, 09:11 PM   #26
HawkeyeNRAlifer
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Two of my three o/u shotguns have two triggers. I learn to shoot using two triggers and find it quicker to select the barrel/choke I need when bird hunting that to hit the selector button on my SKB when needing the tighter choke.
My guess is that the guys were just joshing with you.
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Old April 15, 2014, 09:20 PM   #27
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I have heard of double single triggers on some really high end doubles, combining the best of double triggers and single trigger designs.
The front trigger fires the bottom or right barrel on the first pull and the other barrel on the second pull.
The rear trigger fires the top or left barrel on the first pull and the other barrel on the second pull.
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Old April 16, 2014, 03:19 PM   #28
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The Browning Superposed (the "Twin-Single"variant) and the Mauser Model 620 are two shotguns that offered this feature on some of their guns. Imo, this double trigger set-up, at least theoretically, is by far the best approach to "barrel selection" but over time I have read that the mechanism was overly complicated, expensive to make and failure prone.
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Old April 19, 2014, 09:16 AM   #29
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hmmm

Seems to me that I read one of Michael McIntosh's books about shotgunning in which he discusses the fact that single trigger guns have a disconnect that operates during recoil and which isolates the trigger from the sear because under recoil the trigger finger involuntarily pulls the trigger a second time.
Does that idea sound familiar to anyone else?
If I am remembering that correctly, then putting fingers on both triggers of a double trigger gun seems unwise at best.
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Old April 19, 2014, 10:28 AM   #30
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One of the earliest solutions to the problem of single trigger guns bump firing the second barrel due to recoil pulling the gun away from the trigger finger and then bouncing back was something called the "three pull trigger". If you dry fire the gun, the first pull releases the first hammer, the second pull switches the trigger to the second sear, and the third pull released the second hammer.
During actual shooting, the trigger switches to the other sear from the gun rebounding off your shoulder after the first shot causing you to pull the trigger twice and it appears like it only takes two pulls of the trigger.
I learned about this from a book written by W.W. Greener.

My Ruger O/U has an inertia weight that blocks the trigger while the gun is under recoil to prevent a bump fire double discharge. It has a mechanical trigger, you can dry fire both barrels withoug having to bump the stock to simulate recoil to get it to switch barrels.
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Old May 3, 2014, 12:53 AM   #31
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Quote:
This is probably the first time in my life (and I'm older than seventy) that I've ever heard of using two fingers to fire a shotgun that has two triggers. A ridiculous idea imo.
a perfectly accepted technique to get more lead in the air for hunting

no but seriously I have heard oldtimers say this

And I think it is/was Perazzi that offered a sbs with a third trigger that fired both barrels at once, the barrels were even manufactured with a slight dispersion, to get as big a swarm as possible
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Old May 3, 2014, 05:47 AM   #32
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One finger,either bbl first.

Many side by sides are fine old shotguns of considerable value.

There is a style of using them.Not slamming them open and closed ,for example.

They are generally made to be as light and slender as possible,with the exception of some waterfowl guns.There is not extra wood in them for overkill strength.
Particularly with sidelocks.

Subjecting them to the recoil of doubling is a bad idea.
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Old May 3, 2014, 08:34 AM   #33
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One of the problems with shooting both barrels at once is that it is virtually impossible to shoot both barrels exactly at the same time, one will always shoot a fraction of a second before the other. Because of the recoil of the first barrel resulting in barrel jump, the second barrel will always shoot over the target.

Try it on a big patterning board if you don't believe me.

Also, the bore lines of double barrels converge to compensate for barrel jump during the shot's barrel travel. The top barrel of an O/U jumps more than the bottom barrel so it has to be aimed lower to hit the target. The left barrel of a SXS jumps up and to the left while the right barrel jumps up and to the right.
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Old May 4, 2014, 12:51 AM   #34
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I've always figured having both barrels going off exactly together would put a lot of stress on the weild.
But I've spoken with my SG guru (my grandfather) and he says he used to shoot with one fella pretty regularly who used a two finger method. And was left handed to boot. Says he shot well enough to hang with the big boys. So I suppose there are folks out there who do this.
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Old October 29, 2014, 03:07 PM   #35
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?????????

I've never heard anything so stupid. NEVER.

One of the reasons why you would want dual triggers is so you can fire the chokes in order, open first or open second, depending on the direction and distance of the flying game. Most single triggers I have handled had no switch to alternate barrels. You choose your trigger by your CHOKE, not by where the booger hook fits best.

Elmer keith is one of the greatest authorities in use of a double gun known to history. His choice of a double .577 nitro was simple; the sidelock double can have one barrel completely disabled by mechanical failure, but the second barrel will almost certainly still be functional, and be still as good as the single shot rifles that african hunters had used for decades already.

My personal preference is front first, your finger naturally slides from front to back, and I would choose to set my choke tubes in the order that this would be best facilitated, depending on in or outgoing game.
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Old October 30, 2014, 12:27 PM   #36
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I have my Grandfather's Ithaca double, (made to his order in 1909), and while that gun has two triggers, it doesn't matter which one you pull first, because he had the gun choked FULL/FULL!

Takes a bit of practice to get "on" for wingshooting, but when you are on, it really does the job. (full choke, 1909 standards = super full with modern ammo).

Does a number on foxes, though!
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Old October 30, 2014, 12:30 PM   #37
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All I can recommend is that I DON'T recommend firing two 10 gauge 1.5 oz magnum rifled slugs both at the same time.

It will be most uncomfortable.
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Old October 30, 2014, 02:00 PM   #38
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yes, but god help the rhinoceros you fired it at.

10 gauge slug IMO is even enough for a big griz. the thing is for most intents equal to a .458 magnum. It's way more than is needed for anything smaller than moose, imo.
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Old October 30, 2014, 02:54 PM   #39
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Actually for Rhino the 10 gauge is a bit light the 8 bore is just right.

Back in the day 12 bore was used for thin skinned game and 10 bore for larger game, but not on any animal that would trample or eat you!
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Old October 30, 2014, 04:28 PM   #40
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I watched some youtube videos of people firing 4ga and 2ga. pretty awesome. I had no idea they went that big. guess they are black powder, but still
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hsvizH4U26E
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8uJouw9uh84
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EzwbcVbE9rw

my friends grandfather left him a 10ga, which we only had 2 shells for. I shot it once, birdshot, not as bad as one would think in an old heavy double
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Old October 30, 2014, 08:09 PM   #41
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10 ga, two triggers

As I recall when I was a teenager and hunted with a 10 ga double I learned not to shoot the front trigger first because my finger slipped off to the second trigger and the two shots doubling with a 10 ga 3 1/2" and 2 oz loads at a duck almost drove me down in the swamp.

I don't need to do that again, you do as you wish.
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Old October 30, 2014, 08:17 PM   #42
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They were either stupid or just plain didn't know what they were talking about, or joshing you.

I have hunted with and shot side by sides for 40yrs. As far as I am concerned, the double trigger side by side is nearly perfect for hunting flushing birds. And most of the time, one shoots the more open choked barrel first, but it seem that on almost every hunt, there is a time when a bird flushed almost out of range and I will want to fire the tighter choked barrel first. With the double trigger gun, I have instant choice of which barrel to choose, by just slipping my finger back to the rear trigger on most of my guns. I have never had a single selective trigger that I could choose chokes on, in the heat of the flush.

Shooting with two fingers is only a stunt done or tried mostly by a person that is trying to show off or just plain inexperienced with double trigger guns.
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