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Old February 17, 2014, 11:25 AM   #1
baddarryl
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How many single stacks needed for USPSA?

Hi all. I shot my first match yesterday with my Glock 19, but I think I want to step up to using my 1911 as I just can't see those 9mm holes anymore! I intend to shoot single stack so how many conventional mags would I need? 6?

Also is there a mag limit capacity to that division due to extended mags? If so what is the limit and which ones are good?
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Old February 17, 2014, 11:32 AM   #2
g.willikers
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There's some other considerations, other than just mag capacity.
Don't take our word for it.
Here's the rules from uspsa:
http://www.uspsa.org/uspsa-rules.php
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Old February 17, 2014, 12:46 PM   #3
RickB
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Seeing the holes? You are looking at the target to evaluate your hits? You should be looking at your sights to see where the holes are going to be!
When I shot single stack, .45 major, I carried four, 8-round mags, but I see lots of people carrying six.
You are allowed to load 8+1 if shooting major, and 10+1 if shooting minor, with a minimum .40 caliber for major. The gun must fit in a specified box, with mag in place, that would not allow for any sort of "extended" mag.
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Old February 17, 2014, 12:56 PM   #4
baddarryl
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RickB what I found yesterday was that after I took 2 shots I was able to see if I needed another. On the fly I could not tell where I was hitting with the different A targets (as opposed to IDPA) which I am more familiar with. Seemed like they were are little more vaguely outlined.
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Old February 17, 2014, 02:07 PM   #5
RickB
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Don't waste time evaluating the holes on the target, use a fraction more time on sight alignment and trigger squeeze. Be aware of where the sights are when the shot breaks and you'll know if you've hit where you intended.
The highest scoring zone on the USPSA Metric target is centered in just about the same place as the -0 of the IDPA target, so you can aim in the same place (but don't be looking at it after you've shot it).
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Old February 20, 2014, 12:26 PM   #6
rmantoo
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In USPSA when there are multiple targets arrayed together, by the time I get to the 2nd (or 3rd) target I have seen my first shots in peripheral vision... and most of the time, if I see a B or C, I will place a 3rd shot on the first target... doesn't always work, and I realize it takes me another second or 2, but overall, my goals in USPSA at this point in my 'career' (lol, like the way I shoot and 'compete' could ever have the potential for a job? not) are more about getting as many A's as possible than speed. Part of my own-perhaps incorrect- strategy for long-term growth is that I try to do whatever it takes to make A's happen, no matter what. If that costs me time, so be it.

I am not at the point where I can always, reliably call my shots. Most of the time, yes, but not always. Therefore, when I realize that I didn't place a shot correctly, whether it's because I knew I pulled it, or because I saw the result, I go back and shoot another (unless it's Virgina count rules, of course), taking whatever time it takes to make the shot correctly.

If I couldn't see my shots on the close targets (my local matches rarely have targets beyond 50') and I were shooting 9mm, I'd definitely want to step up to .45.
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Old February 20, 2014, 02:06 PM   #7
Jim Watson
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If you read the target specifications, the scoring areas are not supposed to be visible at shooting distances.
Call your shot and move along.
Improve by improving shot placement and call, not by peering at the cardboard.
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Old February 20, 2014, 03:57 PM   #8
g.willikers
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Yeah, if you're looking for the holes in the target during a stage, you're going too slowly and lacking confidence in your skill.
Watching where the holes go is a good way to practice slow fire trigger control, though.
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Old February 20, 2014, 06:56 PM   #9
g.willikers
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Did anyone actually answer your question of how many mags you might need at a match?
If not, your guess of six is probably good.
But more is better, in case of a problem with any of them.
I have four 8 rounders and six 7 rounders in .45.
Five in pouches, two in back pockets and the rest in the range bag, just in case.
And there doesn't really seem to be any advantage to having one or the other for most courses of fire.
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Old February 20, 2014, 07:39 PM   #10
baddarryl
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Thanks G!
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Old February 21, 2014, 01:28 AM   #11
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A long course of fire is 32 rounds. So depending on your skill and the type of course it is 40 rounds in mags will be plenty.
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Old February 21, 2014, 11:41 AM   #12
RickB
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Quote:
In USPSA when there are multiple targets arrayed together, by the time I get to the 2nd (or 3rd) target I have seen my first shots in peripheral vision... and most of the time, if I see a B or C, I will place a 3rd shot on the first target... doesn't always work, and I realize it takes me another second or 2, but overall, my goals in USPSA at this point in my 'career' (lol, like the way I shoot and 'compete' could ever have the potential for a job? not) are more about getting as many A's as possible than speed. Part of my own-perhaps incorrect- strategy for long-term growth is that I try to do whatever it takes to make A's happen, no matter what. If that costs me time, so be it.
I spent two years in each classification of USPSA on my way to A. Keep at it, and your skills will develop. You want to try to get 90%-95% of the available points - so accuracy is very important, USPSA is not a "spray and pray" game, despite what detractors may say - and try to increase your speed while doing so. It was a slow climb for me.
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Old February 21, 2014, 12:53 PM   #13
g.willikers
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MarkDozer,
At a local match, there was a genuine 48 round stage being set up as folks arrived.
Quite a scramble for mags among the single stack gang, that day.
Lots of sharing.

Almost forgot:
One of the reasons having a couple of loaded mags in a back pocket is in case a mag jumps out of a pouch and plumb disappears during a stage.
Happens more often than you'd think, especially when hopping up from prone or a squat to upright and running.
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Last edited by g.willikers; February 21, 2014 at 12:58 PM.
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Old June 9, 2014, 11:41 PM   #14
Jeff22
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single stack class in USPSA

As rmantoo said: "overall, my goals in USPSA at this point in my 'career' are more about getting as many A's as possible than speed. Part of my own-perhaps incorrect- strategy for long-term growth is that I try to do whatever it takes to make A's happen, no matter what. If that costs me time, so be it."

That's the way I've always shot IPSC/USPSA and I started in 1978 . . .

When I shoot a match in the single stack class, I use the Colt Combat Commander in .45 that I shot my first match with. With one magazine in the gun, four magazines in mag pouches and usually one in a back pocket just in case I need it.

When I first started, I'd buy 10 GI spec mags from Sherwood Distributors, and then function test and adjust them. Usually ended up with 6 of 10 that I could use in a match, and the rest of them were relegated to use as practice mags. I did that a couple of times, to buy replacements as the old ones wore out. I think I still have a few of those around someplace.

I also bought a bunch of magazines sold by Pachmyr (which I think were actually made by Randall but I'm not sure). That was about 30 years ago. I still have all of them. Those were good magazines. I should've bought more.

I bought a bunch of Wilson 47Ds when they came out and I'm still using them. I also have some Chip McCormick Shooting Star mags that work pretty well, although I had one disassemble itself after bounching off the floor at an indoor IDPA match. The follower and the spring shot out the top through the feed lips.

Last December I bought a Springfield M1911 in 9mm. I haven't shot it a lot, but expect to shoot a couple matches with it indoors this winter. I have a couple of Springfield mags that came with the gun, and I bought some Wilson ETMs in 9mm. Research has suggested that magazines from Dawson or Tripp Research might work well too if what I have proves to be a problem.
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Old June 10, 2014, 09:07 AM   #15
Don P
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Quote:
I intend to shoot single stack so how many conventional mags would I need? 6?
My personal choice is to got to the line with 6- 8 round mags and a barnie mag(1 round in it) to use when load and make ready is given to start the stage with 9 rounds. Nice to have an extra mag or 2 in case you should have a malfunction and need to drop a full mag or if you should fumble a mag change. Just my way of approaching things
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Old June 12, 2014, 03:44 PM   #16
WESHOOT2
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'cept I run them perfect (but defunct) Mag-Packs

Eight 8-rd (can recommend those from Wilson and McCormick; don't go cheap) magazines.

Six on your belt, one in the gun, and the one yopu stripped the top rd from to initially load your gun placed in a convenient pants pocket.

And more is even better, except I run out of waist.......
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Old June 12, 2014, 07:03 PM   #17
RickB
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I can remember having to go for my barney mag, twice, when I started with four on the belt. Maybe you can never have too many, but I can't reach more than four.
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