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Old May 25, 2001, 05:23 AM   #1
foxfire
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Join Date: December 24, 1999
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 689
Came across one that a guy wants to sell.
He claims that it was made by the Tula arsenal in 1951.
It appears to be in 98% condition (stock, receiver and barrel). Serial #s (01021xx) match, has the attached
10 round magazine, but no bayonet.
It doesn't look to be altered or modified in any way.
Can anyone give me any info as to the rifle's history
and relative worth?

On a related note, is there any truth to the rumor that
there is no more SKS importation into the US after 08/18/01?

Thanks for any help or advice.



have tape, and am SKSless...
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Old May 25, 2001, 06:33 AM   #2
Harley Nolden
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foxfire:
Here is some information that may be helpful to you. I have worked quite extensively with this rifle and was on the receiving end of it during the Vietnam era. They are reliable and functionable and easy to assem and disassem for repair and cleaning.

THE CARBINE SKS 7.62X39mm
SIMONOV
The SKS semi-automatic carbine was the first Soviet weapon developed to make use of
the M1943, intermediate, cartridge. The history of this cartridge is in some doubt, however, It is
known that the Soviets were experimenting with short cartridges in various calibers prior to the
war, but it is generally accepted that it was the appearance of the German MP44, a 9mm Sub-
machine gun in use today by drug cartels, and its short 7.92mm round which led them to capitalize
on their previous work and develop the 7.62X39mm round. Although the SKS is important for
its introduction of this round, it is of a simple design.

It is easy to operate and a little heavy for the cartridge, which is understandable, as it was
developed under the stress of war. Stripping and maintenance is easy, and the hinged bayonet and
on-piece wooden stock are also prominent features of the weapon. Loading can be done by
chargers or by pushing single rounds into the magazine. Unloading can be done quickly by
releasing the pivoting magazine, allowing the rounds to fall clear of the magazine into the hand.

This weapon has been produced in the millions by the countries which were formally
known as the Eastern Block Countries, or the Communist Block Countries, and is still in
production and imported to the U.S., by The Norenco MFG company of China. The Russian
version of this carbine has a longer stock than the Chinese model, as the Chinese model was
produced for a soldier of smaller stature than the Russians. The Russian model is also
Machined rather than stamped out and has a screw in barrel rather than pinned. This Carbine
is still used by many Armies of the former Communist Countries and is a formidable foe against
any military small arms. It has been manufactured by other countries with minor variations. In
Yugoslavia it is known as the M59, China the Type 56, North Korea the Type 63 with the former
East Germans calling it the Karabiner -S.

During the Nam Conflict, many chopper pilots and ground soldiers, preferred the cut down
version of the SKS Carbine or the Automatic version, AK47 paratrooper, or folding stock model,
of this carbine, over the M-16 or hand guns. Thousands of the SKS s were brought home by
American soldiers, as souvenirs, after the Nam conflict and Desert Storm.

The SKS has been found an excellent semi-automatic hunting rifle in this cartridge. There is
some concern of course with regards to the ten (10) round magazine and the bayonet. This
problem can be corrected by removing the bayonet and bayonet lugs, exchanging the magazine for
a five round magazine or blocking the ten (10) round magazine to accept only five (5) rounds,
adding a monte-carlo stock, making it a formiable, short range hunting rifle..

The 7.62X39 Assault Rifle Cartridge was adopted by Russia in 1943, did not come into general use until after WWII. Original use was in the SKS semi-automatic carbine later replaced by the AK 47 and AK 74, (caliber .22) selective assault rifle, The RPD light machine gun also uses the M43 cartridge. Czechoslovakia, Finland and those countries in the Russian block, use the M43 cartridge in arms furnished by Russia or of their own design.

HJN
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Old May 25, 2001, 11:52 AM   #3
loknload
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SKS Price

foxfire, I paid $300. for a cherry Russian with all the goodies that's suppose to be with it. And it's a beaut
Hope this helps
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Old May 25, 2001, 05:41 PM   #4
foxfire
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Location: Tennessee
Posts: 689
Harley,
Thanks for the background/history of the SKS and
the 7.62x39 cartridge. I knew next to nothing about
the rifle, but had heard lots of folks rave about 'em.

Loknload,
Couldn't wait any longer.
Gave the guy $80 and brought it home.
Figure I can get something for the mount, rings, and
scope he thru in for free, if nothing else.


have tape, and am SKSless no more...

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Old May 25, 2001, 07:55 PM   #5
Spectre
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I'll give you that $80 back for the gun alone, if you ever wander through GA. I like SKS's; I'd like to "loan" my brother one, so he can't sell this one!
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Old May 26, 2001, 06:03 AM   #6
foxfire
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Spectre,
Thanks.
Don't get a chance to get down GA way, too often.
Think I'd better hang on to this one until I can
get a idea of it's worth/importance.
May have to get another to shoot 'til then.

Guess I'll have to go to one of those SKS chatrooms
to find out more info for now.
'Cause the manuel I ordered for it won't be in for
another week or so.

Really thought there were more SKS owners here at
TFL. Maybe not as much traffic here in this forum.



have tape, still clueless....





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Old May 26, 2001, 09:10 AM   #7
Spectre
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You'll get more info on the SKS in the rifle forum. The Russian ones typically have the best reputation. It sounds like you got a really good price on one.
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Old May 26, 2001, 11:45 AM   #8
foxfire
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Location: Tennessee
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Thanks! I'll do just that.




have tape, and moving on to another forum...
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Old May 26, 2001, 02:49 PM   #9
BonesofGa.
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Tula produced small arms can be identified by a 5 pointed star containing an arrow. It was used from 49 till mid 54. In 55 they changed to the star only. Hope this helps confirm things.
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Old May 26, 2001, 03:40 PM   #10
foxfire
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Location: Tennessee
Posts: 689
BonesofGa,
Yes, it does have the star, the arrow and the date.
Thanks for the info.


have tape, and learning a little at a time...
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