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Old December 5, 2013, 11:22 AM   #26
Mike Irwin
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Given the amount of room between the recoil shield and the rear of the cylinder it looks as if that gun has been "cut" to allow its use with .45 ACP/.45 Auto Rim ammo.

If it is an earlier gun, II through IV, it is NOT safe at all to fire with any form of smokless powder ammunition, especially not .45 ACP, which develops nearly double the chamber pressure of .455 cordite ammunition.
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Old December 5, 2013, 06:02 PM   #27
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Basically it's another dust magnet.
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Old December 5, 2013, 08:07 PM   #28
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that's not necessarily true. get some webley brass and load with black powder or light trail boss loads and you'll be able to shoot it just fine.
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Old December 6, 2013, 01:53 PM   #29
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I believe tater 134 is correct, that the rifle is a Type 99 Special Naval model. I have seen only one of those and did not recall that they used a cast trigger guard. But everything is consistent with the pictures of genuine Special Naval models. So, far from being something of a common last ditch Type 99, it is in fact a quite rare rifle. I won't hazard a guess on value. though. (There should be an anchor somewhere on the receiver or barrel and a serial number on the receiver.)


From what I see, I don't think the Webley is a tribal copy, I think it is a Webley; the proofs are standard commercial proofs, and I don't see a broad arrow (more and better pictures, please!), leading me to think it is a commercial version of the government revolver. The workmanship and proof markings are far too precise and well done to be tribal work. The differences among the Mk III, IV and V are too minor to determine without a close examination. The grips were made from gutta percha and the appearance is normal for well worn ones.

Jim
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Old December 21, 2013, 05:35 PM   #30
TheSaint
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Here see pics of the 357 Magnum 1917 and the German single action 44 magnum revolver.









Last edited by TheSaint; December 21, 2013 at 05:48 PM.
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Old December 21, 2013, 05:49 PM   #31
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44 Magnum








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Old December 21, 2013, 05:51 PM   #32
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Again. I don't know much about these weapons. They were sitting in a tool shed for years. I'm putting a few coats of CLP on them and rubbing them down and lubricating the moving pieces.

I'm going to take some steel wool to them and have them checked out and cleaned up by a gunsmith.
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Old December 21, 2013, 07:24 PM   #33
James K
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The U.S. Army Model 1917 (both Colt and S&W revolvers shared that designation) was made to use .45 ACP. But after they were sold off as surplus, many were reworked by gunsmiths for other calibers, partly to eliminate the need for clips when ejecting fired cases. Many were converted to .45 Colt, but they were also converted to .357 Magnum, .38 Special, and other calibers as customers wanted. That one was converted to .357. It is hard to tell if the markings are from a factory or were applied by the gunsmith, or a combination, but the New Service is adequately strong for the .357 (factory level loads).

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Old December 22, 2013, 11:08 AM   #34
gyvel
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As I stated before, that barrel on the 1917 sure looks like a Numrich special from years past, and still available.

To wit:
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Numrich .357 barrel.JPG (92.2 KB, 12 views)
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Old December 22, 2013, 03:23 PM   #35
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Tater 134 is correct. It is a Navel "Last Ditch" rifle. They are extremely rare. I had collected Arisakas for over 30 years and only ever saw one. They are also very dangerous. P.O. Ackley tested one and it came apart like a grenade. Even rough as it is, someone will want it.
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