The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Hide > The Hunt

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old December 10, 2013, 01:17 AM   #26
Brotherbadger
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 10, 2010
Posts: 639
Quote:
Nah, there's more important things than getting a buck. When we have deer and antelope that get used to being in town around people, they wouldn't be much fun to hunt anyway - half tame. If I was out of money and hungry it would be a different story of course.
Nailed it. If it's not a matter of survival for me, i'd let it walk.
__________________
Once Fired Brass, Top quality, Fast shipping, Best prices.

http://300AacBrass.com/ -10% Coupon use code " badger "
Brotherbadger is offline  
Old December 10, 2013, 01:51 AM   #27
Buzzcook
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 29, 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 5,624
If it's staying inside the city limits then it's not legal to hunt.

Don't think waiting outside town for it to come out or driving it out would be a good idea.
Buzzcook is offline  
Old December 10, 2013, 08:17 AM   #28
skoro
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 30, 2008
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,719
Would you shoot it?

No I wouldn't. Maybe it's just me, but I enjoy seeing wildlife up close from the comfort of my home. So, any deer that hang around my place wouldn't become a target. Heck, I've had some by my back door that I could whack with a broom handle, but I don't bother them. Besides, it wouldn't be legal in any case.
skoro is offline  
Old December 10, 2013, 08:34 AM   #29
TenRing
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 1, 2009
Posts: 415
As pictured, standing on a RR track in town, absolutely not. If I was deer hunting and he happened by my stand, I would nail him.

People who enjoy treating wildlife as pets should go out into the wildlife habitat to to their viewing. This is safer for wildlife and for humans. Sometimes deer wander through my subdivision and meander from house to house, probably looking for food. Sometimes they crash thorough patio windows and gallop through homes.

Once I saw a large buck standing on a neighbor's front porch down the street. I often wonder what reaction the homeowner would have if he opened the door expecting someone else and saw bucky standing there. Deer are definitely not meant to be pets.
__________________
Gun control...that's when you learn to hit where you aim.
TenRing is offline  
Old December 10, 2013, 11:30 AM   #30
buck460XVR
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 28, 2006
Posts: 2,078
Quote:
Nah, there's more important things than getting a buck. When we have deer and antelope that get used to being in town around people, they wouldn't be much fun to hunt anyway - half tame.
^^^This. Besides, most animals like that are totally tame and have no natural fear of humans. Shooting it would be no different than shootin' someone's barnyard Tom during turkey season. Pets like dogs and cats get hit by cars all the time, no justification to shoot them just cause they might. For those folks makin' the "he's meat" argument. Doubt if there's anybody here in the lower 48 that can afford a computer, internet access and has the time to post on internet forums, that needs to shoot a tame deer to keep from starving to death......
buck460XVR is offline  
Old December 10, 2013, 12:24 PM   #31
thallub
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 20, 2007
Location: South Western OK
Posts: 2,093
No!!! i don't shoot deer that are town pets.
thallub is offline  
Old December 10, 2013, 01:19 PM   #32
Brian Pfleuger
Staff
 
Join Date: June 25, 2008
Location: Central, Southern NY, USA
Posts: 18,789
I'm amused by selective ethics.

It's either ethical to shoot a deer for eating purposes or it isn't.

No matter how many people think that thing is a "pet", a great many folks with similar opinions have been proven wrong in very painful ways.

It's a wild animal. Just because it's not afraid of people anymore doesn't mean there's some new moral code introduced that prohibits shooting it.

How does effort or the animals stupidity factor into the ethics of shooting it?

Who decided that it only counts if it takes a certain number of hours or if you have to try hard enough?

Is that kid who walks into the woods on his first day of hunting and 15 minutes later has the 10 point standing in front of him supposed to pass on it because it wasn't hard enough for him?

I participate in a hunting program that's run by Cornell University. The first couple of years we hunted, many of the deer in some areas paid no attention whatsoever to people. One time, I had a doe and hers fawns within 15 feet of my stand. I had a new rest on the bow that a friend wanted me to try. I didn't like it and it didn't contain the arrow. The arrow fell off the rest when I drew. She heard the arrow hit the riser and looked up at me. I couldn't get the arrow back on the rest so I had to let down. She stood there looking at me. I reached out, put the arrow back on the rest, drew the bow again and shot her.

Guess I shouldn't have shot her since I'm sure someone thought she was a "pet".

Oddly enough, she tasted just like every other deer I've ever eaten.
__________________
Still happily answering to the call-sign Peetza.
---
The problem, as you so eloquently put it, is choice.
-The Architect
-----
He is no fool who gives what he can not keep to gain what he can not lose.
-Jim Eliott, paraphrasing Philip Henry.
Brian Pfleuger is offline  
Old December 10, 2013, 02:13 PM   #33
Pahoo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 16, 2006
Location: IOWA
Posts: 5,589
Differing Hunting Ethics !!!

Quote:
I'm amused by selective ethics.
It's either ethical to shoot a deer for eating purposes or it isn't.
Yes, I suppose some might find it amusing but you have to agree, it's predictable and acceptable as we all have differing "Hunting Code Of Ethics". I have never had any reservations on killing any animals but I set the rules for me. As stated before and pertaining to this scenario, I would have no reason to shoot this particular deer. However, I have no issues with anyone else who would do so, legally. I have seen some folks who turn wild animals, into pets and personally feel it would be wrong for me to do so ....

Recently have seen where folks in Syria, who are starving, have been shooting Lions at the Damascus zoo, for food. That sure works for me and if faced with that situation, I'd fight you for every scrap. ....

"Hunt" and;
Be Safe !!!
__________________
'Fundamental truths' are easy to recognize because they are verified daily through simple observation and thus, require no testing.
Pahoo is offline  
Old December 10, 2013, 03:37 PM   #34
buck460XVR
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 28, 2006
Posts: 2,078
Quote:
Originally posted byBrian Pfleuger:

I'm amused by selective ethics.

It's either ethical to shoot a deer for eating purposes or it isn't.
This thread is not about the ethics of shooting a deer for eating it. It's about shooting a deer that other humans have befriended and fed, that is no longer a truly wild animal but an adopted pet. While I agree, training a wild animal to look to humans as a source of food and protection is not the most intelligent thing to do, it happens more than we care to admit. Too many times there are stories in the local papers about a similar situation and the amount of negative feedback hunters receive....even tho shooting the animal was legal. I believe we as hunters should always present the most positive image we can. Like it or not, it is what we need to do to preserve our traditions. As I said before....nobody posting here needs the meat that bad. That 60 lbs of venison is not worth the amount of negative publicity we as hunters would receive. Can't imagine being proud of or even justifying a kill like that, as long as the animal is healthy and not a threat. Anyone getting some form of enjoyment from shooting a tame animal has got bigger problems than what they eat. As Pahoo stated, we all have our own personal code of hunting ethics. But this is not about hunting, it is about shooting a tame animal. In Hunter Safety class we tell our students that ethics is doing the right thing when no one else is around......and sometimes, even when legal, it might not be the "right" thing.


I'm sure for every one of us that claims we would not shoot the animal, there is some one out there that would, just because it's easy and they can. These same hunters would either brag about shootin' the "pet" deer before someone else did or make up some wild story about how they stalked it for hours. The type of hunter one wants to portray to others is entirely up to them. Your choice.
buck460XVR is offline  
Old December 10, 2013, 03:56 PM   #35
Brian Pfleuger
Staff
 
Join Date: June 25, 2008
Location: Central, Southern NY, USA
Posts: 18,789
More selective ethics. You get enjoyment from killing a wild animal you're ok, you get enjoyment from killing a tame animal you're sick. Or does being happy when you shoot one just mean you're sick no matter what?

Appeasement, eh? Don't shoot it or the anti's will be mad.

Yeah, they're pretty mad already. Rather than agreeing with them, I'd rather tell them to get real.

It's not a pet. It's a wild animal. It makes no difference if they think it's Bambi or not. It isn't. Shooting it under legal hunting conditions is no different than shooting ANY other animal under legal conditions.

Where is this line, exactly? I keep hearing so much about it from all kinds of different angles. If an animal isn't wild enough, or if you don't stalk it far enough or you hunt from tree stands or if your shots are too long.

We need a book with all the rules.

You're not a real hunter unless:
1)You don't hunt from a stand
2)You don't shoot over 100 yards
3)You don't shoot animals that like people

How many more are there?

You're a sick, psychopath is you:
1)Shoot animals for any reason other than food.

etc
etc

Please.
__________________
Still happily answering to the call-sign Peetza.
---
The problem, as you so eloquently put it, is choice.
-The Architect
-----
He is no fool who gives what he can not keep to gain what he can not lose.
-Jim Eliott, paraphrasing Philip Henry.
Brian Pfleuger is offline  
Old December 10, 2013, 04:58 PM   #36
ZeroJunk
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 14, 2006
Location: Browns Summit NC
Posts: 2,483
I suppose if you don't know how to hunt or don't have a decent place to hunt it would make some sense to take whatever you could. But, apparently for most of us it would not be interesting, satisfying, challenging, or whatever, at all.
ZeroJunk is offline  
Old December 10, 2013, 05:18 PM   #37
FrankenMauser
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 25, 2008
Location: 1B ID
Posts: 6,804
Quote:
No I wouldn't. Maybe it's just me, but I enjoy seeing wildlife up close from the comfort of my home. So, any deer that hang around my place wouldn't become a target. Heck, I've had some by my back door that I could whack with a broom handle, but I don't bother them.
You may change your opinion when you come out to your truck, one day, and find that the deer have eaten all the weatherstripping and rubber and plastic seals.

If they're lacking certain minerals in their diet, they've been known to eat everything from car tires, to weatherstripping, to plastic body panels, and even the paint (scraping it off with their teeth).

In one of the places that I lived in Florida, there was a gated community just over the fence from me, where one of my friends lived. They had a small herd of the tiny little Florida Coastal Whitetails that had taken up the habit of chewing on the fake, plastic storm shutters on all of the houses, and had damaged several of the community's covered gazebos. After a few months, and many thousands of dollars in damages, the HOA that had previously protected the deer quietly arranged for the local rednecks (on my street) to "make the deer go away" as soon as deer season opened.

The residents complained that the deer were gone, but NONE of them complained that their houses and community property weren't being damaged any more.

Stupid deer = Easy meat!
__________________
"Such is the strange way that man works -- first he virtually destroys a species and then does everything in his power to restore it."
FrankenMauser is offline  
Old December 10, 2013, 05:22 PM   #38
ZeroJunk
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 14, 2006
Location: Browns Summit NC
Posts: 2,483
I guess I'm supposed to shoot deer now because I'm afraid of them.
ZeroJunk is offline  
Old December 10, 2013, 05:51 PM   #39
FrankenMauser
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 25, 2008
Location: 1B ID
Posts: 6,804
Quote:
I guess I'm supposed to shoot deer now because I'm afraid of them.
What/whom is that comment directed at?
__________________
"Such is the strange way that man works -- first he virtually destroys a species and then does everything in his power to restore it."
FrankenMauser is offline  
Old December 11, 2013, 07:51 AM   #40
skoro
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 30, 2008
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,719
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankenMauser
You may change your opinion when you come out to your truck, one day, and find that the deer have eaten all the weatherstripping and rubber and plastic seals.
If that happened, I may.

But in the five years I've owned this property, none of that has been a problem.

Quote:
If they're lacking certain minerals in their diet, they've been known to eat everything from car tires, to weatherstripping, to plastic body panels, and even the paint (scraping it off with their teeth).

In one of the places that I lived in Florida, there was a gated community just over the fence from me, where one of my friends lived. They had a small herd of the tiny little Florida Coastal Whitetails that had taken up the habit of chewing on the fake, plastic storm shutters on all of the houses, and had damaged several of the community's covered gazebos. After a few months, and many thousands of dollars in damages, the HOA that had previously protected the deer quietly arranged for the local rednecks (on my street) to "make the deer go away" as soon as deer season opened.

The residents complained that the deer were gone, but NONE of them complained that their houses and community property weren't being damaged any more.

Stupid deer = Easy meat!
Fill your freezer, then. This isn't a "one size fits all" situation, obviously.
skoro is offline  
Old December 11, 2013, 09:43 AM   #41
Art Eatman
Staff Lead
 
Join Date: November 13, 1998
Location: Terlingua, TX, USA
Posts: 22,540
What does a hang-around buck have to do with eating deer meat?

I like just sitting and watching wild critters. It's as enjoyable for me as going to a museum or watching a sporting event of some sort.

Since the world is full of deer who do the hide-or-run thing, having a volunteer to show up and be looked at seems like a neat thing. So why shoot him and wipe out the enjoyment? And not just for me, but for others as well? I dunno. I like seeing folks smiling a lot more than I like seeing boredom or frowns.

Personally, I see shooting that particular buck in the described circumstance as the shooter's having an attitude of, "Ha, ha, ha, I sure rained on your parade!"

Lord knows I love hunting, and deer meat is yummy-tasty. But this particular situation? 'Scuse me, this old redneck will pass that deal.
__________________
You're from BATFE? Come right in! I use all your fine products!
Art Eatman is offline  
Old December 11, 2013, 11:51 AM   #42
buck460XVR
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 28, 2006
Posts: 2,078
Quote:
Originally posted by Art Eatman:

Lord knows I love hunting, and deer meat is yummy-tasty. But this particular situation? 'Scuse me, this old redneck will pass that deal.
I'm with Art. In the first sentence of the OP, we are told the animal is the town pet. Not just any urbanized deer eating the shutters off every house in the town. We are not told is is a pest, or diseased or a threat to small children(altho I am surprised this wasn't brought up by someone to legitimatize shooting it). This scenario has nuttin' to do with hunting or the ethics of fair or unfair chase. It has to do with the ethics of shooting the town pet......by someone well off enough financially, they do not really need the meat. I'm thinkin' shooting this animal knowingly, would make one's mama, their wife, and their children real proud. Maybe even help you hang the deer up in the front yard or make sure everyone in town sees it in the back of the truck at the local watering hole. Whatta you think?
buck460XVR is offline  
Old December 11, 2013, 12:15 PM   #43
Brian Pfleuger
Staff
 
Join Date: June 25, 2008
Location: Central, Southern NY, USA
Posts: 18,789
I haven't the slightest issue with choosing to not shoot this buck if you could.

I probably wouldn't be interested, though if they opened a hunting program as they did with Cornell, due to severe over-population problems, and that deer walked by I'd shoot it.

That's a different scenario than trying to find a way to meet this particular deer in one spot that just happens to be legal and then shooting him and bragging about it.

The issue I have is the implication that it's somehow unethical to shoot it.

Given a big bucks range, there's good chance that this guy wanders onto huntable land and probably a good chance that some of the people who hunt that land have no idea that this wild animal is someone (or a whole town's) adopted "pet".

I worked with a guy once who hunted an area about 25 miles from his home. Opening day of deer season one year, he or his father (I don't recall which) shot a piebald deer.

On the way home, the stopped at the town diner. Before they had even been served, someone walks in and says "Hey! Who shot that deer out on that truck!?" Long story short, the owner of the diner refused to serve them and they were all but run out of town.

Turns out the town had "adopted" that deer. People had food piles in their yards for it. That's illegal in NY State, BTW. The guy I worked with had no idea. He didn't know anyone knew the deer existed. He had no idea if it were tame or not tame. He saw it and shot it. Suddenly it's a huge ethical issue, he's a bad guy, whole town hates him.

It's just crazy, IMO.
__________________
Still happily answering to the call-sign Peetza.
---
The problem, as you so eloquently put it, is choice.
-The Architect
-----
He is no fool who gives what he can not keep to gain what he can not lose.
-Jim Eliott, paraphrasing Philip Henry.
Brian Pfleuger is offline  
Old December 11, 2013, 12:56 PM   #44
Pahoo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 16, 2006
Location: IOWA
Posts: 5,589
Implications ??

Quote:
The issue I have is the implication that it's somehow unethical to shoot it.
It would be unethical, but only for "me" and others, who feel that way. I won't judge others hunting ethics, as long as they hunt, legally. No implications here. As stated before, someone will eventually shoot it and that's their call. .....
The issue I have, is that you are passing judgment on those who would choose not to shoot or at least, that is the implication.

As a moderator, you are suppose to make sure we are following the rules and being civil, not to measure or question our hunting ethics. ....

The Piebald deer, mentioned in my earlier reply, was shot illegally. Two weeks later, the park was opened to a control "Hunt". That is not what I call it but so be it. I, as well as other instructors, provided support to the hunters and previously had wondered who would get the Piebald. ....

Hunt and;
Be Safe !!!
__________________
'Fundamental truths' are easy to recognize because they are verified daily through simple observation and thus, require no testing.
Pahoo is offline  
Old December 11, 2013, 01:30 PM   #45
MTT TL
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 21, 2009
Location: Quadling Country
Posts: 1,801
I am just a meat hunter. That thing would be going straight to the freezer and table.

Quote:
I'm thinkin' shooting this animal knowingly, would make one's mama, their wife, and their children real proud. Maybe even help you hang the deer up in the front yard or make sure everyone in town sees it in the back of the truck at the local watering hole. Whatta you think?
In my town? I'd be the pride and envy of ALL. No way it could have lived that long in "my" town. If they ever found out who the heck was feeding it they would be run out of town on a rail or the hunters would just start hanging out around her place looking for low hanging fruit.

Quote:
This thread is not about the ethics of shooting a deer for eating it. It's about shooting a deer that other humans have befriended and fed, that is no longer a truly wild animal but an adopted pet. While I agree, training a wild animal to look to humans as a source of food and protection is not the most intelligent thing to do, it happens more than we care to admit. Too many times there are stories in the local papers about a similar situation and the amount of negative feedback hunters receive....even tho shooting the animal was legal. I believe we as hunters should always present the most positive image we can.
I name my animals, I even like some of them. Even the tasty ones. I say quit the hypocrisy and become a herbivore if you can't handle it. I would much rather eat one of my animals that I know than the mystery meat at Mickey D's any day of the week.
__________________
Proxima est Mors, Malum Nullum adhibit Misericordiam
MTT TL is offline  
Old December 11, 2013, 01:42 PM   #46
buck460XVR
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 28, 2006
Posts: 2,078
Quote:
Originally posted by Brian Pfleuger:

I worked with a guy once who hunted an area about 25 miles from his home. Opening day of deer season one year, he or his father (I don't recall which) shot a piebald deer.

On the way home, the stopped at the town diner. Before they had even been served, someone walks in and says "Hey! Who shot that deer out on that truck!?" Long story short, the owner of the diner refused to serve them and they were all but run out of town.

Turns out the town had "adopted" that deer. People had food piles in their yards for it. That's illegal in NY State, BTW. The guy I worked with had no idea. He didn't know anyone knew the deer existed. He had no idea if it were tame or not tame. He saw it and shot it. Suddenly it's a huge ethical issue, he's a bad guy, whole town hates him.

It's just crazy, IMO.

But that is not the case in this scenario. We know from the start, it is the town pet and we are asked if we would shoot it, fully aware of the fact.

In previous similar threads I have told two stories of where this has happened around me, involving folks I know. Either they did the shooting or they had befriended the deer. As you stated in the above quote, in both of the other scenarios, it was perfectly legal...the problem was the huge negative impact on the local hunters by it. Thinking that the portrayal of negative images of hunting does nothing to hurt hunting opportunities is just simple denial. If a hunter, with permission to hunt a property, wrecks a fence or tears up a field because he is after deer causing crop damage, who do you think will suffer the most from the farmer next season? In one of the scenarios I brought up in previous threads was the shooting of an albino deer. Albino deer have always been protected in Wisconsin for as long as I can remember(I've been hunting deer since 1964). The exception in the last few years has been in the newly created CWD zones. In these areas hunters are allowed to take any deer and as many as they want. Just last year an out of state hunter knowingly shot a albino deer that many in the area had befriended, fed and protected. Altho it was perfectly legal, because the area was a CWD zone, it created a big stink in the area and many of the local landowners swore to reduce hunter access to their property because of it. Solely, because of all the negative media attention contributed to this one legal activity, the state has now again, just this year, put albino deer in CWD zones on the protected species list. So tell me again, tickin' off non-hunters and even hunters themselves with a negative image, has no consequences.
buck460XVR is offline  
Old December 11, 2013, 01:49 PM   #47
MJN77
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 27, 2009
Location: on a hill in West Virginia
Posts: 688
Quote:
I name my animals, I even like some of them. Even the tasty ones. I say quit the hypocrisy and become a herbivore if you can't handle it. I would much rather eat one of my animals that I know than the mystery meat at Mickey D's any day of the week.
Amen. I raise beef cattle and have had no problem butchering one or two every year. I've even eaten a few I have raised on a bottle. If you eat meat from a store, you eat domesticated cattle. Not wild, animals that are hunted. Tame animals from a farm. I don't see a difference in shooting a "tame" deer or butchering a "tame" steer. Meat is meat. Nobody owns that deer. It is a wild animal and in the right area it would be legal to shoot.
MJN77 is offline  
Old December 11, 2013, 02:03 PM   #48
ZeroJunk
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 14, 2006
Location: Browns Summit NC
Posts: 2,483
Well, someone killing a domesticated cow is not referred to as a sportsman. I would like to think that more goes with the name than just killing whatever you can kill.
ZeroJunk is offline  
Old December 11, 2013, 02:31 PM   #49
Buzzcook
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 29, 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 5,624
Quote:
One time, I had a doe and hers fawns within 15 feet of my stand.
That's poor game management. The fauns stand a much greater chance of growing into big eatable animals if they stay with their mother as long as possible.
Buzzcook is offline  
Old December 11, 2013, 02:33 PM   #50
buck460XVR
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 28, 2006
Posts: 2,078
Quote:
Originally posted by ZeroJunk: Well, someone killing a domesticated cow is not referred to as a sportsman. I would like to think that more goes with the name than just killing whatever you can kill.
In Hunter Safety, besides asking our students to do the right thing when no one else is around, we also talk about the 5 stages of a hunter. It is a study that is recognized not only by my state, but by most other states as well as many Provinces in Canada. The "sportsman" stage comes last in the cycle and for many folks, they never get there. Pretty obvious from the various posts here where the authors of those posts are in the cycle.

FIVE STAGES OF A HUNTER

Hunters change through the years. Factors used to determine
"successful hunting" change as well for each hunter. A hunter's age,
role models, and his years of hunting experience affect his ideas of
"success."

Many hunters may fit into one of the following five groups. In
1975-1980, groups of over 1,000 hunters in Wisconsin were studied,
surveyed, and written about by Professors Robert Jackson and Robert
Norton, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. The results of their
studies form a widely accepted theory of hunter behavior and
development. Where are you now? Where would you like to be?

SHOOTER STAGE

The hunter talks about satisfaction with hunting being closely tied to
being able to "get shooting." Often the beginning duck hunter will
relate he had an excellent day if he got in a lot of shooting. The
beginning deer hunter will talk about the number of shooting
opportunities. Missing game means little to hunters in this phase. A
beginning hunter wants to pull the trigger and test the capability of
his firearm. A hunter in this stage may be a dangerous hunting
partner.

LIMITING OUT STAGE

A hunter still talks about satisfaction gained from shooting. But what
seems more important is measuring success through the killing of game
and the number of birds or animals shot. Limiting out, or filling a
tag, is the absolute measure. Do not let your desire to limit out be
stronger than the need for safe behavior at all times.

TROPHY STAGE

Satisfaction is described in terms of selectivity of game. A duck
hunter might take only greenheads. A deer hunter looks for one special
deer. A hunter might travel far to find a real trophy animal. Shooting
opportunity and skills become less important.

METHOD STAGE

This hunter has all the special equipment. Hunting has become one of
the most important things in his life. Satisfaction comes from the
method that enables the hunter to take game. Taking game is important,
but second to how it is taken. This hunter will study long and hard
how best to pick a blind site, lay out decoys, and call in
waterfowl. A deer hunter will go one on one with a white-tailed deer,
studying sign, tracking, and the life habits of the deer. Often, the
hunter will handicap himself by hunting only with black powder
firearms or bow and arrow. Bagging game, or limiting, still is
understood as being a necessary part of the hunt during this phase.

SPORTSMAN STAGE

As a hunter ages and after many years of hunting, he "mellows out."
Satisfaction now can be found in the total hunting experience. Being
in the field, enjoying the company of friends and family, and seeing
nature outweigh the need for taking game.

Not all hunters go through all the stages, or go through them in that
particular order. It is also possible for hunters who pursue several
species of game to be in different stages with regard to each
species. Some hunters feel that role models of good sportsmen,
training, or reading books or magazines helped them pass more quickly
through some stages.
buck460XVR is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:36 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.13998 seconds with 9 queries