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Old December 5, 2013, 12:14 AM   #26
FrankenMauser
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I like the Winchesters, but I prefer the Marlins. As others have said... buying a used Marlin is more likely to result in a decent (or great) rifle, than taking a chance on a Winchester. Much of that is due to the other reason I prefer Marlins...

The Winchesters are more complicated (not by much, but by enough to matter). There's more to go wrong, and many of the guns on the used market are there because something did go wrong.

Of course, it's a very nice bonus that you can pick up the Marlins and "off-brand" Marlins (Western Field, Glennfield, Kmart, etc) for half the price, or less, than that of Winchesters in the same condition.

I just picked up a fantastic '70s production 336C in .30-30 for $260, and that's barely below average around here. It is a solid rifle with a nicely broken-in and smooth action, some minor bluing wear, and two little dings in the butt stock. And it came with a mounted scope, and a good sling.


Oh, and one other thing about post-64 Winchesters....
They have a sintered metal receiver that does not respond well to bluing. So, Winchester iron-plated them at the factory, and then blued the iron plating. If you get a post-64 rifle that has a lot of bluing wear or deep scratches, and you want to fix it, it will cost you much more than the same restoration on a Marlin (or pre-64 Winchester).
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Old December 5, 2013, 01:10 AM   #27
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''They have a sintered metal receiver that does not respond well to bluing. So, Winchester iron-plated them at the factory, and then blued the iron plating. If you get a post-64 rifle that has a lot of bluing wear or deep scratches, and you want to fix it, it will cost you much more than the same restoration on a Marlin (or pre-64 Winchester).''

I have to agree , my father had a 1969 model which would rust if someone sneezed & the bluing came off without any encouragement. Accuracy was pretty hopeless as well .
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Old December 5, 2013, 06:18 AM   #28
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I had one also, it had a rust problem and I was told it couldn't be re-blued. I found out the hard way that cold blue wouldn't work either, what a mess! 94's are nice trim little rifles but I'd rather have a Marlin. Try pulling the bolt out of each one, you better be mechanically inclined if you have a Winchester!
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Old December 5, 2013, 12:29 PM   #29
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Marlin all the way for me. My 336 in .35 is my go to deer gun. The 336 has a nice scout scope setup I like. I also have an 1895M in 450 that I absolutely love.
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Old December 5, 2013, 01:45 PM   #30
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I have one of each. I love the way the winchester feels in my hands. Its slim and light like a modern kentucky rifle. I have a williams peep on mine. And mine is a post 64 with the cast parts not the stamped. I have no issues with how its made. And I bought it just about 6 months ago for $275. Its a little skinned up but that just means I don't have to baby it.

My marlin was made in 1978 IIRC and has the cross bolt safety plus a half cock saftery. The cross bolt saftey doesn't bother me in the least. I used to have an O-ring on it so it was disabled. It took it off and never worried about it again.

I like the fact that its easy to scope. It doesn't have a scope on it now but as soon as I pick up another VX-1 2x7 it will wear glass again. A scope just gives me so much of an advantage and the gun has shot 1" groups in the past so I know its accurate. You can only shoot as well as you can see.
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Old December 5, 2013, 02:33 PM   #31
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In the early 80s the Winchester receivers were returned to forged steel that can be re-blued.
They've been forged ever since.
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Old December 6, 2013, 11:29 AM   #32
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I'm one of those that would never dream of putting a scope on a lever action.
I once thought the same thing. But like me, you will change your mind someday when age changes your eyes. A lever rifle with a scope sure beats not being able to hit anything.
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Old December 6, 2013, 12:13 PM   #33
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Cast not sintered.
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Old December 6, 2013, 12:51 PM   #34
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Sintered.
I was told that by a Winchester service technician over 15 years ago.
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Old December 6, 2013, 02:50 PM   #35
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Oh, and one other thing about post-64 Winchesters....
They have a sintered metal receiver that does not respond well to bluing. So, Winchester iron-plated them at the factory, and then blued the iron plating. If you get a post-64 rifle that has a lot of bluing wear or deep scratches, and you want to fix it, it will cost you much more than the same restoration on a Marlin (or pre-64 Winchester).
Well, not entirely true. In 1983 and since, with the advent of the "angle-eject" model (allowing you to use a top-mounted scope for those so inclined), Winchester reverted to making Model 94s (as DPris correctly stated) with all forged steel parts and a more conventional bluing.
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Old December 6, 2013, 04:53 PM   #36
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Cast not sintered.
Sintered graphitic steel.

If they were cast, they wouldn't have had to plate them for bluing.
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Old December 6, 2013, 07:27 PM   #37
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I once thought the same thing. But like me, you will change your mind someday when age changes your eyes. A lever rifle with a scope sure beats not being able to hit anything
I'll be 57 this month and I'm diabetic. My eyesight is screwy already. So far I'm doing good with full buckhorns. I do have a few scoped rifles but a lever will be absolutely the last thing I ever mount a scope on.
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Old December 6, 2013, 07:32 PM   #38
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I have a full buckhorn on my 336 carbine and a Williams receiver sight on my 36 ADL rifle. While the receiver sight is easier to see the buckhorn ain't that bad either.
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Old December 7, 2013, 05:56 PM   #39
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My eyesight is screwy already. So far I'm doing good with full buckhorns.
Try using a good receiver sight like the Williams or Lyman. A much quicker sight acquisition can be achieved than you can ever get with conventional irons if you use a peep sight for hunting correctly (sighting through the aperture, focusing only on the front sight and not attempting to center the front sight with the rear opening). With a little practice, you'll be pleasantly surprised as to how speedy a receiver sight can be.
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Old December 7, 2013, 06:17 PM   #40
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For a everyday work gun I would go with a Marlin. I like the feel of a Winchester better, but I think the Marlin is tougher, simpler, and more well suited for real world use. Also, if you intend to scope it, a Marlin just looks better with glass on top. A 94 doesn't look right at all with a scope.
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Old December 8, 2013, 08:35 AM   #41
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I always liked Winchester and did not like Marlin. Come on, it's Winchester. Never owned either. When I finally decided to get a lever gun at age 51, I handled both in the store and the Marlin was an easy choice for me. I think Winchesters are better looking but will take a Marlin any day. YMMV.
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Old December 8, 2013, 08:52 AM   #42
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The guy"s with a Winchester need to disassemble them and get back with us. Not allot of fun!
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Old December 8, 2013, 11:21 AM   #43
Hawg Haggen
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Try using a good receiver sight like the Williams or Lyman. A much quicker sight acquisition can be achieved than you can ever get with conventional irons if you use a peep sight for hunting correctly (sighting through the aperture, focusing only on the front sight and not attempting to center the front sight with the rear opening). With a little practice, you'll be pleasantly surprised as to how speedy a receiver sight can be.
I use the full buckhorn as a ghost ring.

Quote:
The guy"s with a Winchester need to disassemble them and get back with us. Not allot of fun!
Not too bad once you've done it a few times, now a 92 is a different story.
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Old December 8, 2013, 04:13 PM   #44
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Why one fetch's more money over the other. Collectors and the popularity of such weapons set their value. If you want one bad enough you'll pay whatever the asking price. It's simple. "What ever the market will bare" sets the going price between those two brands.
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Old December 10, 2013, 12:42 AM   #45
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Sintered not cast.
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Old December 10, 2013, 03:35 AM   #46
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I like the Marlins better. - But that's just me.

The important thing is to get what you like.
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Old December 21, 2013, 09:13 AM   #47
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I've noticed that my 94 Winchester kicks more than my wife's 336. Hers is easy on the shoulder while my 94 hits you pretty good - more than you would expect out of a 30-30. I got lucky with the wife's gun - it's a 336 cc (camo stock). Haven't seen any of them around or on auction sites. For some reason I can't upload a photo from my computer because it says the file is too big.
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Old December 22, 2013, 02:01 AM   #48
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For some reason I can't upload a photo from my computer because it says the file is too big.
You need to resize the image, so that the largest dimension is no more than 800 pixels. For landscape orientation, that would be 800 pixels wide. For portrait orientation, it would be 800 pixels tall.
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Old December 22, 2013, 08:28 AM   #49
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My marlin was made in 1978 IIRC and has the cross bolt safety
CBS did not come into full production till 1983...

As for Marlin vs. Winchester, I regularly shoot Marlin levers manufactured from 1912 to 1990...

I've only fired one Win94 ever, and coming from a 1958 Marlin 336RC in .35 Rem, I was not impressed enough to ever shoot another...
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