The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > The Harley Nolden Memorial Institute for Firearms Research

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old July 27, 2013, 10:58 PM   #1
Mowgli64
Junior Member
 
Join Date: July 27, 2013
Posts: 5
.22 browning rifle

I am looking for more information including value of a .22 Browning

The barrel has the following information on it

fabrique nationale d'armes de guerre herstal-belgique
Patent dispose

Under the scope it states;

.22 long rifle smokeless

There are no markings on the stock itself

I have done a little research on can only determine it is from 1914-1955 since there is no serial number

It is in fair condition with some scratches on the stock as well as minor rust on the stock plate. All original hardware.

It is in working order. Fired off 6 shots simultaneously without issue
Mowgli64 is offline  
Old July 27, 2013, 11:17 PM   #2
James K
Staff
 
Join Date: March 17, 1999
Posts: 19,286
Semi-auto? Something else?

We need good, clear pictures for any even reasonably valid guess on value.

Jim
__________________
Jim K
James K is offline  
Old July 27, 2013, 11:21 PM   #3
Jim Watson
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 25, 2001
Location: Alabama
Posts: 10,987
Rather than play 20 questions, I suggest you show some pictures.
Jim Watson is offline  
Old July 27, 2013, 11:36 PM   #4
Mowgli64
Junior Member
 
Join Date: July 27, 2013
Posts: 5
It is semi auto. Will take some pics and post them
Mowgli64 is offline  
Old July 27, 2013, 11:54 PM   #5
Mowgli64
Junior Member
 
Join Date: July 27, 2013
Posts: 5
Hoping this works



Mowgli64 is offline  
Old July 27, 2013, 11:55 PM   #6
Mowgli64
Junior Member
 
Join Date: July 27, 2013
Posts: 5
hmmm If you look me up on Facebook John M. Saunders. I have posted 4 pictures of the rifle. They should be viewable by the public
Mowgli64 is offline  
Old July 28, 2013, 12:30 AM   #7
Jim Watson
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 25, 2001
Location: Alabama
Posts: 10,987
That is an old one. Likely pre-WWII, maybe by a lot. But I don't know how to tie it down closely.
Jim Watson is offline  
Old July 28, 2013, 12:33 AM   #8
4V50 Gary
Staff
 
Join Date: November 2, 1998
Location: Colorado
Posts: 16,735
No facebook, but this is the Browning that is bottom ejection, fed through the tubular magazine in the stock and is a take down rifle?
__________________
Vigilantibus et non dormientibus jura subveniunt. Molon Labe!
4V50 Gary is online now  
Old July 28, 2013, 08:41 AM   #9
Mowgli64
Junior Member
 
Join Date: July 27, 2013
Posts: 5
Hi Gary. Yes it is the model you described. It is definitely a gun that has been well used but figure it has to have some value given it's age and the fact it is a Browning pre-patent.
Mowgli64 is offline  
Old July 30, 2013, 11:18 AM   #10
Scorch
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 13, 2006
Location: Washington state
Posts: 11,429
If it says Fabrique Nationale d' Armes de Guerre on it, it is not a Browning. Brownings say Browning on them and Made In Belgium. Browning had the marketing rights for all FN products in North America. Same gun and all, just not a Browning. Most likely, it is a vet bring-back. After WW2, our troops confiscated all firearms in the occupied territories, and then helped themselves to the firearms. Very common.

As far as value, Sarco had some a few years back selling in the $250-ish range.
__________________
Never try to educate someone who resists knowledge at all costs.
But what do I know?
Summit Arms Services
Taylor Machine
Scorch is offline  
Old July 30, 2013, 11:39 AM   #11
PetahW
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 19, 2008
Posts: 4,679
.

You have an early Grade I FN (which made all pre-1976 Browning Auto-22's) Auto-22, designed by John Browning - in somewhat less than pristine condition.



It could stand some (gentle) cleaning, especially around the rear sight (temporarily remove the sight for a detailed cleaning).



The SN's most likely stamped into the face of the receiver, only viewable after the barrel's removed/taken down, by sliding the little forarm latch away from the receiver, and twisting the barrel 90-degrees while holding the bolt back (grasp the rear by the receiver, NOT by the buttstock, or the stock WILL crack).

You can check recently successfuly closed/sold gun auctions for "Belgian Auto-22" for one in similar style/condition to find out it's current value (How much someone's actually been willing to pay).



.

Last edited by PetahW; July 31, 2013 at 01:49 PM.
PetahW is offline  
Old July 30, 2013, 03:24 PM   #12
James K
Staff
 
Join Date: March 17, 1999
Posts: 19,286
The same rifle was made in the U.S. by Remington as their Model 24 and 241. That design was probably the most reliable semi-auto .22 until the advent of the Remington Nylon 66, and the .22 Short version was widely used by shooting galleries.

John Browning designed the gun. Like some of his other designs he licensed manufacture to FN in Belgium and to Remington in the U.S. under non-compete agreements. After WWII, when Remington no longer desired to keep the model in the line, FN expanded into the U.S. market (as they also did with the Auto 5). The name "Browning" on those rifles indicates only that they were imported by Browning Arms Co., an importing and marketing company which has no manufacturing capability.

Jim
__________________
Jim K
James K is offline  
Old December 2, 2013, 03:18 PM   #13
PetahW
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 19, 2008
Posts: 4,679
.

Jim - While the design of the Remington 24/241 is similar to the Browning, it's also very different, in the fact that the Remington action has exposed screw heads on the sides; while the Browning has none.




.
PetahW is offline  
Old December 2, 2013, 06:24 PM   #14
James K
Staff
 
Join Date: March 17, 1999
Posts: 19,286
IIRC, those are plug screws for locating holes used in manufacture. I don't know why Remington needed them and FN didn't, but they are not operating parts. Browning's agreements with the companies that bought his patents or paid him royalties didn't preclude the manufacturers from changing or improving the product as they saw fit, and all the companies that made Browning design guns made some changes to the basic design. Still, the FN and Remington versions of those little .22's are so similar that many parts will interchange and they are, to all intents and purposes, the same gun. (There are also differences between the .22 Short and .22 LR versions of each manufacturer.)

Jim
__________________
Jim K
James K is offline  
Old December 4, 2013, 05:11 PM   #15
4V50 Gary
Staff
 
Join Date: November 2, 1998
Location: Colorado
Posts: 16,735
BTW, be careful in taking the barrel/forearm assembly off from the receiver. It's easy to lose the springs & plungers that go in there. I had to make replacement parts for a couple of them.
__________________
Vigilantibus et non dormientibus jura subveniunt. Molon Labe!
4V50 Gary is online now  
Old December 4, 2013, 06:35 PM   #16
James K
Staff
 
Join Date: March 17, 1999
Posts: 19,286
OK, I will tell one on myself. I had replace the firing pin on a Browning and went next door to the range to test fire it. I loaded it and, as usual, counted the rounds. I fired it and it worked OK, but I was sure I had loaded one round more than I had fired. I worked the action several times, concluded that I was mistaken, pointed the gun down and pulled the trigger to let the hammer down. Guess what? Yep, my counting was right, I hadn't fired all the rounds in the gun.

So back to the bench to strip and clean the gun right and get the crud out of the magazine tube. Taught me a couple of lessons, that did. 1) make sure everything works on a gun before you test fire it, not just what you fixed and 2) always check a gun like that to be sure it is unloaded; then check again, and again.

Jim
__________________
Jim K
James K is offline  
Old December 4, 2013, 11:00 PM   #17
PetahW
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 19, 2008
Posts: 4,679
.

I bought one that would always leave the last 2 rounds in the magazine.

It turned out that the 2-1/2" long, narrow neck of the follower had snapped off from the base of the follower & gone walkabout B 4 I bought it.........

Since the rear feed path curves over the top of the bolt, what was left of the broken follower was limiting on the throat of the magazine, since it couldn't follow that curve like the narrow follower neck could.

A new inner magazine tube assembly (w/follower & spring) fixed it up.


.
PetahW is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:14 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.09513 seconds with 9 queries