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Old October 31, 2013, 03:21 PM   #26
WVsig
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Quote:
I don't think anybody's saying that it is bad practice.
The point of contention I guess is:"is it necessary?".It makes you feel better,
gives you a better picture of what you just bought,you just plain like doing it.
Ok no problem,it's your piece but I still don't buy the necessity of doing it.
And not to belabor the issue but firearms were not designed to put the shooter's health on the line,it was something else that was meant to be there.
Am I wrong?
Yes you are wrong. The grease that is used to pack a new firearm is not used because of its lubricating qualities it is used prevent rusting during long term storage because the manufacturer has no idea when it will be sold.

These oils can and do cause malfunctions if they are not removed before firing. Would you shoot a surplus gun covered in cosmoline? If it is cold out the gun will cease up. At normal operating temps cosmoline will leak out all over the place.

Modern preservatives are not that extreme but they have a tendency to heat up trap dirt, powder and debris which will cause action problems. They are not formulated to lubricate at higher temps seen under shooting conditions. It is always a good practice to clean and inspect your new gun prior to shooting. This does not mean if you don't you will see a malfunction but you will increase your odds if you leave the packing oil/grease on the new gun. IMHO Clearly YMMV
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Last edited by WVsig; October 31, 2013 at 03:28 PM.
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Old October 31, 2013, 03:40 PM   #27
overkill0084
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Do I need to clean it before I use it the first time?
A cleaning isn't just a cleaning. It's also an opportunity to inspect and familiarize yourself with your new firearm. If there is any of that packing goop all over your new toy, it's corrosion preventative not gun oil or slide grease. If you blow it off, will your pistol work ok? Probably. But on a 1911 I'd probably be more observant of propriety, than with, say, a Glock or M&P. As mentioned previously, 1911s as a species do not respond well to being dry.

Quote:
Cleaning something that is not dirty,doesn't make much sense to me.
In my experience, many NIB guns have been fired and shipped without cleaning. If you've ever received one with the fired case in the box for those jurisdictions where it's required, you can bet that there wasn't a careful cleaning afterwards. (My CZ & my Ruger being just two I can remember off hand.) Ditto w/ factory functional check firings.
Guns are one of the few things where new doesn't always equal clean.

Quote:
Most gun shops lube them up before they put'em in the display
Actually most do not.
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Old October 31, 2013, 03:55 PM   #28
Fishbed77
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Cleaning something that is not dirty,doesn't make much sense to me.
I have NEVER see a new firearm that was clean in the box.

Every new firearm I have ever bought had either residue from manufacturing or testing, or an abundance of preservative grease, or both.

All that stuff has to come out and proper lubrication has to go in before you can rightfully expect a firearm to function properly and safely.
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Old October 31, 2013, 06:58 PM   #29
polyphemus
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Thank you all for your well meaning responses,now I know amongst other
things that I am wrong for thinking that firearms were not designed to keep
the shooter from harming himself but rather as weapons.
Now this gem:
Quote:
1911s as a species do not respond well to being dry.
The M1911 is a military weapon designed to respond well under any conditions.
All the new M1911's I've bought (and that's all I own)came squeaky out the box,I checked them out and then I shot them,just like that no regrets.
I simply practice what I preach.
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Old October 31, 2013, 09:49 PM   #30
GregInAtl
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From the for what it's worth department, since there so many varied opinions about this I decided to call Colt customer service about this and they told me it was fine to take it straight out of the box and take it to the range and shoot it without cleaning it first.
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Old October 31, 2013, 11:46 PM   #31
Fishbed77
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I decided to call Colt customer service about this and they told me it was fine to take it straight out of the box and take it to the range and shoot it without cleaning it first.
It doesn't HAVE to be cleaned, but it should still be inspected and lubricated properly.
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Old November 1, 2013, 10:39 AM   #32
overkill0084
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The M1911 is a military weapon designed to respond well under any conditions.
All the new M1911's I've bought (and that's all I own) came squeaky out the box,I checked them out and then I shot them,just like that no regrets.
I simply practice what I preach.
The Army didn't didn't like to run them dry either:

http://www.m1911.org/MAINT45A.PDF

Quote:
23. Lubrication
a. Make certain all metal parts are cleaned and dried thoroughly in accordance with instructions contained in paragraph 19.
b. All metal parts will, be lubricated by applying a light coat of general purpose lubricating oil (PL special). As a part of all assembly and installation operations, lubricate sliding surfaces to reduce friction and assure free movement.
c. Lubrication and preservation materials are listed in TM 9-1005-211-12P/2.
Aw heck, The US Army, what do they know?
I know of no machine, designed to be lubricated, that will operate as well without lubrication.
Just because you got away with it, doesn't make it the preferred method.
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Old November 1, 2013, 10:56 AM   #33
dahermit
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It is not necessary to take the slide off your new 1911 and inspect/clean/lube it any more than it is necessary to stop at an unmarked railroad crossing and look both ways. In regard to the RR crossing, if you do not stop, you are betting your life that a train is not coming. It is much the same with your new 1911, if you do not inspect (may as well lube it also) the inside, you are betting that the quality control dept. did its job without error. Of the four new Colt 1911's that I purchased new over the years, all had quality issues that should have been detected and addressed but were not. Some were so obvious that a blind man should have seen it. You do not know what you might find on the inside. What are you willing to bet?
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Old November 1, 2013, 11:41 AM   #34
polyphemus
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Ok,like I keep writing the M1911 is a military weapon not a Swiss watch.
That doesn't mean that it needs no maintenance after use,this is only reasonable,proper care of the firearm is one thing obsessive rub-a-dubbing is
another.
I do not think I get away with anything by not "cleaning" my new pistols,I take
my trusted loupe to the gun shop,do not buy sight unseen or foreign made
pistols and always try to keep a good perspective on gun ownership.Whenever
I take any of them for practice they are as ready as can be expected,my
eyesight is a different story.Whatever soothes your spirit.
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Old November 1, 2013, 12:05 PM   #35
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Dahermit, good post and a great analogy...Couldn't have said it better, although I tried...Good work my friend. Rod
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