The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Conference Center > General Discussion Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old October 31, 2011, 02:59 PM   #51
Stevie-Ray
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 22, 2007
Location: The shores of Lake Huron
Posts: 4,519
Quote:
Ok, Bill Ruger was wrong. The Standard design was not just as reliable as other designs, it beat all the other designs, and for one third the price. So much for "you get what you pay for".
I couldn't agree more. I'm not quite as old as some here, but I'm really hearing the "old fart" jokes even at 55. And I got my Ruger RST-6 new for less than a hundred bucks even in 1979. I started with a Stevens model 34 bolt-action .22 in 1968 for my birthday, though I cut my teeth 3 years earlier on a Mossberg 352 and was forever hooked. I still have and shoot the Stevens, and can, when time permits, spend a leisurely day at the range shooting that for practically nothing. Below is my RST-6, my first pistol and still a fine gun. $92

__________________
Stevie-Ray
Join the NRA/ILA
I am the weapon; my gun is a tool. It's regrettable that with some people those descriptors are reversed.
Stevie-Ray is offline  
Old October 31, 2011, 03:14 PM   #52
Iron Man
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 12, 2010
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 345
I may not be an old timer at 54, but AARP thinks I am. Anyway, I still have my father's old .22lr Western Auto rifle and his Savage double barrel 12 guage. I think I started shooting when I was about four.
Iron Man is offline  
Old October 31, 2011, 03:31 PM   #53
JWT
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 16, 2007
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 3,147
I'm only 71 and I still have the Model 24 Winchester 20 Ga. shotgun I got for christmas when I was 12 years old.

Also have a Stevens Model 85A .22 semi auto I bought with money from my paper route when I was 11. Times have sure changed. I went to the local hardware store, picked out what I wanted from a catalog. A week later I gave the store owner the money, he gave me the gun, and I rode my bike home with it.

Of course I had a Daisy Red Ryder when I was about 9.
JWT is offline  
Old October 31, 2011, 04:16 PM   #54
Stressfire
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 16, 2011
Location: Ohio
Posts: 1,497
Another young pup reading this (27), and gotta say you old guys always have the coolest stuff

All kidding aside, great pieces of history and family on here
__________________
"The best diplomat I know is a fully charged phaser bank" - Montgomery Scott
Stressfire is offline  
Old October 31, 2011, 08:26 PM   #55
603Country
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 6, 2011
Location: Thornton, Texas
Posts: 2,264
I just turned 64, and I'm not totally worn out yet, but maybe I'm close to worn out. I started with the same fine weapon that many of you did - the Red Ryder BB gun. I shot it so much that I had one BB gun for shooting and two for parts (yes, later I did become an engineer). From the BB gun I moved up to a Stevens single shot 410 and my Grandpa taught me how to squirrel hunt with it. After that, Grandpa must have decided that I wasn't a safety risk, so he taught me to shoot his Stevens 22 bolt action, which doesn't appear to have a model number or serial number anywhere I've looked on it. Grandpa was a WWI rifle and machine gun instructor, so his shooting instruction was exactly what I got later in the USMC (though he was nicer about giving me the lessons). After I 'graduated' from his training, he bought me a Stevens 87D 22 semiauto that I have now passed along to my oldest grandson. Then I moved on to centerfire rifles, with lever action Marlins first, then a BAR, then bolt actions. I've often wondered if I ever got to be as good a shot as Grandpa, but I'll never know. I will tell you that he was deadly with his Model 12 Winchester in full choke, but I never got to see him shoot a centerfire rifle.
603Country is offline  
Old November 1, 2011, 08:58 AM   #56
madmag
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 7, 2007
Location: The South
Posts: 4,239
Since we are showing some of our older guns I will attach photo of my 12ga. Browning Auto Five, made circa 1936.

There is a story behind this gun. I was my wifes fathers gun. One night my wifes mother thought there was a burglar in the basement closet of their walk out basement home. She took the Auto Five and put the stock against the basement wall to absorb the recoil and shot through the basement closet door. She then ran back upstairs......why run when you have a 12ga. Auto five in your hands. The recoil broke the stock. I had to replace the stock and the closet door. Notice in the photo the stock and forearm really don't match.

The police were called. No burglar found, but the police assured her that if there was a burglar they were real sure he/she would not return.

http://thefiringline.com/forums/atta...7&d=1291392993
madmag is offline  
Old November 1, 2011, 05:24 PM   #57
Major Dave (retired)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 12, 2008
Location: Between Dallas and Shreveport, LA
Posts: 552
I'm 70 and my first guns

were a pair of 22's my mother and father bought when they were dating, about 1935ish.

Actually Daddy bought both of them when they were "courting". Seems going rabbit and/or squirrel hunting was one of the things they would do together on a "date".

His: Rem Model 24 semi-auto chambered for 22 Short, only. Breakdown barrel. Magazine port in the side of the buttstock. Capacity 10 rounds. Splinter forearm on the stock. A John Browning patent action. Now available as a (pricey) Browning semi-auto, with a much beefier stock, high gloss finish, and available in three or four levels of engraving on the action, IIRC.

Hers: the Winchester "gallery" gun, i.e.,Model 62, pump action, exposed hammer, chambered for short, long, and/or long rifle, interchangeably. Round barrel. Magazine is under the barrel. IIRC magazine holds 18 Shorts, or 12 Long Rifle shells. Never used Longs, so don't know mag capacity of those. The forearm of the stock is used to cycle the action, and is of the "corn cob" configuration.

Both of them had open iron sights, and still do.

I still own both of them, and shoot them at the range about twice a year. Haven't hunted with them in decades.

Started hunting with these, mostly the Rem M24, at about age 12, with my primary targets being Blue Jays. My daddy paid me a 5c bounty for every "jaybird", because they ate off his pecan trees. He had 52 budded papershell pecan trees on the 8 acre patch of land we lived on. He claimed a jaybird woud eat a "peck" (1/4 bushel) of pecans each year.

The price of a box of 22 Shorts was 41c, so 8 jaybirds just about paid for a box of 50 rounds (break even point). The other 42 rounds was where I could make my profit. I averaged 45 birds per 50 round box. - about $1.85 profit per box.

My first shotgun was a 20 gage pump by Western Field (Montgomery Ward). I was 14 years old, and got it for Christmas. There was a 40 acre city lake about 1/2 mile south of our land, so my best buddy (who got a 20 gage bolt action Mossberg for Christmas,and I commenced to harass the local flocks of mallards and pintails.

My buddy's Mossberg had an adjustable choke, so the next summer I earned enough money as a caddy at the nearby golf course to buy a Poly Choke, complete with a muzzle brake. I had to "one up" my buddy.

Doves were on my short list of shotgun targets, along with ducks. I'm still a pretty good dove shot, averaging one down in three shots.

I still own that first 20 gage, but now use a very pretty Rem Model 870 twenty gage Lightweight Magnum Wingmaster with the most beautiful figured wood stock I have ever seen outside of custom guns.

My first center fire rifle was a sporterized M93 Mauser chambered for 7X57. Bought it from my childhood buddy, for $40, when we werein our early 20's. He bought it from Sears, in original military configuration. Then he bought a left hand rollover Monte Carlo stock, partially glass bedded it, and tried to drill the barrel for a scope mount. So, it was a work in progress, but since I was left-handed too, I took the deal he offered -$40. I paid another @40 to a gunsmith to install a Timney trigger, bend the bolt handle down to clear a scope, replace the drilled barrel, full length glass bed it, and mount my Weaver V9 3-9x40 AO scope on it.

Shot a small bull elk with it using Norma 150 grain bullets. Also shot a prairie dog at 245 paces with 110 grain Norma ammo.

Couldn't shoot anything but (mild) factory loads in it, so traded it (with cash to boot) for a modern strong action bolt action in 7X57, in a leftie action.
Got only $150 in trade for it. Buyer said the Timney trigger and the Weaver scope were the most valuable components. But for me, memories - priceless!
__________________
Artillery lends dignity to what would otherwise be but a vulgar brawl.

Last edited by Major Dave (retired); November 1, 2011 at 05:43 PM.
Major Dave (retired) is offline  
Old November 2, 2011, 08:16 AM   #58
madmag
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 7, 2007
Location: The South
Posts: 4,239
Thanks to all that posted. Some great stories and photo's.

One question I wish I had asked is how many of you old timers conceal carry? I do on a daily basis. I guess I will save that for some future thread.
madmag is offline  
Old November 2, 2011, 09:22 AM   #59
johnbt
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 6, 1999
Location: Richmond, Virginia USA
Posts: 6,004
"How old would you be if you didn't know how old you were?" - Satchel Paige.


I'm 61 and my grandparents and most of their siblings were all born in the 1890s. I've actually carried my great uncle Ed's nickel plated 1884 S&W .38 break top. And my grandfather's IJ .32 for a day until I realized it wasn't reliable.

I grew up around guns. Every family had them it seemed. And my father was a State Trooper when I was born.

My first gun was a BB rifle my grandparents gave me for Christmas in 1955. I never really needed a gun of my own as a kid, there were always plenty around for plinking and hunting thanks to my uncle the gun trader.
johnbt is offline  
Old October 19, 2013, 01:35 PM   #60
John Wetzler
Junior Member
 
Join Date: February 12, 2012
Posts: 2
MadMag

I am 73 and still have my first rifle the Winchester Model 57 22LR and I believe I was about six years old when I started using it. My dad was in the Army then WW11 when he gave me the rifle. I have always been an expert shot because of having my model 57.

Last edited by Vanya; October 19, 2013 at 03:22 PM. Reason: no "want to buy" here, please.
John Wetzler is offline  
Old October 28, 2013, 09:41 AM   #61
High Desert
Junior Member
 
Join Date: October 27, 2013
Posts: 11
Old Timers

I guess I fit into that category at 70, have been shooting most of my life but just started reloading in last 30 years.
I do not type but just use one finger, only learned about the Computer at 60 from my wife, so am very slow at this which is ok because I can do other things fast, but typing ain't one of them.
High Desert is offline  
Old October 28, 2013, 12:32 PM   #62
Kimio
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 2, 2011
Location: Utah
Posts: 888
Another young punk reading this thread (24 here). I always enjoy talking with the older gentlemen that I see at the range, they always seem to have such interesting stories to be told. Lots of nostalgia of the good old days and stuff like that.

I just hope that I live as long and will be able to share such memories with my children and god willing, grandchildren. (First I need to find the right women, hah!)

Many blessings upon you all, may you live for many years more
Kimio is offline  
Old October 28, 2013, 12:55 PM   #63
kerreckt
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 18, 2011
Location: SE VA.
Posts: 106
I will be 60 come this January. I still have the Marlin 81, I bought when I was 13 years old, for $19.95. I still shoot it regularly. Just yesterday my youngest son and I were out back of the house having a shooting competition using this rifle and a couple of others. It is part of some of my happiest memories.
kerreckt is offline  
Old October 28, 2013, 01:23 PM   #64
Sevens
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 28, 2007
Location: Central Ohio
Posts: 8,775
This is a necro-thread, a good two years old before it was recently resurrected.

That doesn't bother me a bit, just pointing that out. And the part I'm going to quote here in a second is also a 2-year old post.
Quote:
Will be 79 in 4 weeks. Due to divorce I was sent to the farm to live with my grandparents.
MAN, that reads quite funny.

Makes it sound like a 78-year old guy upsets the wife....
gets divorced...
And the ex-wife sends him off to a farm to live with some really, really old people.
__________________
Attention Brass rats and other reloaders: I really need .327 Federal Magnum brass, no lot size too small. Tell me what caliber you need and I'll see what I have to swap. PM me and we'll discuss.
Sevens is offline  
Old October 28, 2013, 02:37 PM   #65
SIGSHR
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 13, 2005
Posts: 3,076
64 years old, first fired a firearm-22 rifle at Boy Scout Camp, Summer of 1963, have my first rifle I purchased-M1917 Enfield-and first handgun-Browning High Power, both purchased in 1967 when I was in the Army.
SIGSHR is offline  
Old October 28, 2013, 04:21 PM   #66
PeteApps
Member
 
Join Date: September 6, 2013
Location: Meridian, ID
Posts: 36
I'm 55 and starting to be on the receiving end of the old fart jokes. At least I can get the AARP discount.

My dad started me out around 5 years old with the BB gun and shooting a .22 with him holding it around me.

This is my grandfather's old Win model 12, not sure what year it is, but probably the early 1930's. I inherited it from my father, and will pass it along to my grandson when he is old enough. So it will be his great, great grandfather's gun. It's well worn, but no rust. I only shoot it once in a while, just because.

__________________
Ready, Fire, Aim! D'Oh!!!
PeteApps is offline  
Old October 29, 2013, 12:07 PM   #67
Art Eatman
Staff Lead
 
Join Date: November 13, 1998
Location: Terlingua, TX, USA
Posts: 22,539
I made it to 79, back in July.

Started shooting my grandfather's .22 in 1940. First Daisy Red Ryder at Christmas, 1941, courtesy of my mother (Okay, Santa. ) Had my first very-own .22 in the summer of 1945 at age 11. Moved up to '06 and handloading at age 16.

Been pretty much useless, ever since.
__________________
You're from BATFE? Come right in! I use all your fine products!
Art Eatman is offline  
Old October 29, 2013, 02:54 PM   #68
bill-may
Member
 
Join Date: October 18, 2013
Location: San Diego,ca
Posts: 20
70 here. had a daisy bb gun until i joined navy. they gave me a 1903 springfield. then a M1,then a M14,then a M16A1 then a M16A2 and i carried a M60 in my 5 ton truck. good times.
__________________
guns enemies are rust,bubba and politicians.
bill-may is offline  
Old October 29, 2013, 10:48 PM   #69
Doc TH
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 15, 2005
Posts: 508
I fit your desription of an old timer. First gun was Mossberg 144 (in about 1957-'58, learned to shoot at a club in Queens, NYC. Unfortunately I don't have it anymore. Then got a Remington 513T - now in possession of one of my sons, so it hasn't left the family. Won Bluejacket's Marksmanship Award at Great Lakes boot camp in '64. Got M1 carbine from CMP in '65 while in primary flight training; still have it. Shot on 4th Naval District pistol team '66 through '69. Had hiatus from shooting in medical school and residency. Now do recreational trap/skeet and multi rimfire and CF pistol rifle when I get the opportunity. Still think about the Mossberg 144 and shooting in Queens when you could ride the bus with a cased rifle without any publicconcern. How times have changed!
Doc TH is offline  
Old October 29, 2013, 11:45 PM   #70
medalguy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 31, 2009
Location: New Mexico
Posts: 1,017
I'm 68, almost 69 and my first gun that I can remember was of course a Red Ryder, probably about age 5. I really can't remember, case of CRS I guess. Anyway the first "real" gun was a Remington Model 41 Targetmaster, bolt action .22. I think I must have been about 8 when I got that one and my dad and I used to hunt rabbits near San Antonio on the weekends.

The first gun I bought myself was at age 16 when I went into a pawn shop and saw this beautiful Swiss Vetterli 1878 and I just had to have it, so I saved up the princely sum of $15 and bought it, and carried it home on the school bus. Nothing unusual at that time, and I completely refinished both the metal and wood on that one. I still have it, and the Targetmaster. I haven't shot the Vetterli in about 40 years because ammo is impossible to find.

I've since added a few more to the collection.
medalguy is offline  
Old October 30, 2013, 12:00 AM   #71
Water-Man
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 23, 2008
Location: N. Georgia
Posts: 1,548
I'm 69. Got my first firearm from my grandfather in 1951.

It's a Savage Model 3 in .22 Short - .22 Long - .22 Long Rifle. Single shot.

Yes, I still have it and shoot it.
__________________
PROUD TO BE A VETERAN
Water-Man is offline  
Old October 30, 2013, 02:54 AM   #72
Lucas McCain
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 7, 2013
Location: Callaway, MN
Posts: 200
I am 71, and grew up on a dairy farm. The first gun I used was a single shot springfield 22 and the targets were barn yard pigeons, because they carried a disease called "Bangs". If your herd got this disease, the whole herd had to be destroyed. And there was no compensation given to the farmer. Dad wanted the pigeons killed, but if all you did was scare them away,that was OK too. The Springfield was a cheap gun and we had 3 of them always loaded with shorts. One was in the house, one in the barn, and one in the machine shed. Anytime you saw a pigeon you grabbed the closest gun and tried to kill it. I was only 5 years old at the time.
At the age of ten I wanted a shotgun to hunt ducks and pheasants. I trapped pocket gophers and got two bits apiece for bounty. Come fall i had earned over $40 dollars in gopher money. The coast-to-coast store had a L.C. Smith 20 ga. double in the used rack. I had put $20 dollars down it on a 90 day lay-away in July and paid it off the first week of Sept. I trapped a bunch of gophers that year and rode my bicycle many miles over most the township doing it.

That winter I trapped muskrats, mink and weasels. Rats brought $1 apiece weasels were $2.50 and mink were $20 apiece. I did quite well that winter had over $200 in my pocket. I went back to coast-to-coast and for $125 I ordered a 30-30 model 64 winchester. My dad had one, and other than the three springfield 22's that was the only gun he owned. I still have one of the springfields, the L.C. Smith and both 64's and I still hunt with them.

Those were great times then, I built a gun cabinet with glass doors and storage drawers in wood shop at school. It was put in the living room to display with pride not only the fine looking cabinet but to proudly display the guns too. It don't even have a lock on it. Today I have to hide the guns in a safe and the gun cabinet is got shelves and the wifes knick knacks in it.

They didn't offer kindergarten back then, but I was taught how to shoot and handle a gun before I went to the first grade. Go figure, by todays standards I was raised by unfit parents.
__________________
If you have time to do it twice, then you have time to do it once right and put your name on it
Lucas McCain is offline  
Old October 30, 2013, 03:55 AM   #73
jughead2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 28, 2008
Location: tenn.
Posts: 201
old timers

76 here. winchester 1906. still have it could go to the woods hunting by my self as a birthday present at the age of 12. first shot gun was a 16 gauge stevens single shot. none of my teen age buddies would shoot it more than once. that gun had a kick like a mule wish i still had it.
jughead2 is offline  
Old October 30, 2013, 06:23 AM   #74
Brit
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 29, 2005
Location: Orlando FL
Posts: 852
Old timers don't sleep long? I was on the Lap Top at 4-30. Well first I am 78, became so, on the 27th, 3 days ago.

Reading all the good old American first gun stories, as an Englishman (Citizen in 2011) makes me jealous, I was born 8 miles from the Liverpool Docks, that got hit with German Bombers in the second World War, we got a few over shoots as well, lost a buddy to a stray one.

Got my first gun, and 6 Navy Cutlasses, found in a bombed out house, at age 8.
So called owned by some IRA old guy? The Revolver said British Bulldog on the barrel, the front sight was gone, barrel cut short. I think it was a top break, don't remember. My Older Brothers 410 shot shells fitted in the cylinder, 6 shot. But too long, so I cut some to fit, melted wax from a candle!! to seal the shot in, crazy. Did not blow any fingers off.

As my Dad kept a Pub, I took it down to the Beer cellar to try it out! Huge bang, 100 years of dust came down, a barrel of beer was contaminated, my backside was hot for a while! Gun went to local Police.

Next one was a 410 break open, single shot, shotgun. Used to shoot rats with it, at local dump. It had a skeletonized butt, the middle was missing, from new.

Webley Mark I Air Pistol, break top Air Pistols for years, shot a million pellets through them.
After National Service, two years, bought my first .22 Pistol, a Spanish Star.

It had the worse trigger ever, joined a Gun Club, started trading up.

I got to be a real good shot, joined Pistol Clubs in England, Australia, Canada, The US of A.

Now carry a pistol every day (Glock 19, spare G17 magazine too) gave my Grandson a Glock 19, so he could work for his Dad, my Son.

My Dad said I would grow out of this Gun thing! Wrong. He also said I would not live to see 35 (after the second time I was stabbed, working at The Cavern Club, as a Bouncer, 1960 till 64) still here Dad!

Great reading all these stories, I am still shooting IDPA matches, won most accurate spot in Sept. out of 68. Still fit, Wife of twenty years, second one, and I still having a great time.
Brit is offline  
Old October 30, 2013, 08:54 PM   #75
lefteye
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 30, 2006
Location: Iowa
Posts: 676
I'll be 67 in 30 days. The first gun I ever shot was single shot bolt action .22. I did not own it, nor did my father, grandfather or any other relative. I welcome to this forum those with little or no firearms experience, regardless of age. There is a wealth of knowledge among members - valuable knowledge that can be communicated to the inexperienced.
__________________
NRA Life Member - RMEF Life Member - Vietnam Vet
lefteye is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:24 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.13935 seconds with 10 queries