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Old September 3, 2013, 09:04 PM   #26
Mikef262
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@Pahoo

Sounds like they are starting to lean in the right direction, and have a good grand dad to learn from. Oh yes losing knives is easy and possible! I have recently lost my other benchmade knife while working a part time job at the soccer fields. It is somewhere in the middle of a soccer field. I must have filled our John Deere gator 3 different times that day in efforts to find it. It was solid black with stainless blade. Impossible to find.
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Old September 3, 2013, 09:39 PM   #27
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I do health and safety for my company; years ago all personal safety vests were switched from orange to chartreuse. The reason we were given was "drivers associate blaze orange with traffic cones, and other traffic barriers. Drivers are willing to make occasional contact with cones, etc."

Statistically, accidents frequently occur when a driver mistakes a stationary worker in high vis orange for a road barrier. Drivers allow larger "buffers" when they think other people are vulnerable.
Ever slow down passing a jogger, cyclist, mommy with stroller?
Ever slow down for a single safety cone?
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Old September 3, 2013, 11:15 PM   #28
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Interesting. I didn't know that, but it makes perfect sense.
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Old September 5, 2013, 05:45 PM   #29
buckhorn_cortez
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The green color your referencing is called "Safety Lime Yellow." There was a study in the 1970's and 80's of visibility-related fire vehicle accidents. This also included field trials of safety lime yellow vehicles versus red vehicles. The results were that visibility-related, multiple vehicle accidents were more than 3x greater with red vehicles than the safety lime yellow vehicles.

Now the question is - why? The reason is quite simple. The normal human eye is most sensitive in daylight to the color of light at approximately 555 nanometers - that corresponds to safety lime yellow. The color appears brighter to your eye than any other color making it easier to see.

Before we get the "What about people that are color blind" questioning - the statistics are that approximately 8% of males are color blind and 0.5% of females - meaning for 8.5% of the population, the safety lime yellow color may not be perceived as being the brightest color. Statistically, the color works for 9 out of 10 people.

Last edited by buckhorn_cortez; September 5, 2013 at 06:00 PM.
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Old September 5, 2013, 06:08 PM   #30
Bronxbomber252
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Actually that would work out to be 4.25%... 8% of males is 8% of roughly 50%... .5% of females is .5% of roughly 50%... in this case you average not add. Which I realize actually strengthens your point.

Put another way, 8% of males is about 4% of total, and .5% of females is about .25% of total, making it 4.25% of total

Last edited by Bronxbomber252; September 5, 2013 at 06:19 PM.
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Old September 5, 2013, 07:03 PM   #31
buckhorn_cortez
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Ac
Quote:
tually that would work out to be 4.25%... 8% of males is 8% of roughly 50%... .5% of females is .5% of roughly 50%... in this case you average not add. Which I realize actually strengthens your point.

Put another way, 8% of males is about 4% of total, and .5% of females is about .25% of total, making it 4.25% of total
You are absolutely correct - I did not look at it from a statistics standpoint. The 2010 census sex ratio is 49.2% male, 50.8 percent female - I'm not sure how to account for transgender...which would affect the male/female color blind accuracy - since we're apparently picking nits on this one...
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Old September 8, 2013, 05:45 AM   #32
johnelmore
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I have never met anyone who was color blind or who had admitted such to me. In any event those who are color blind probably have learned ways around it. For example, the red light. If the light isnt red to them they still know its time to stop. They have learned to look for clues beyond the color itself I can surmise.
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Old September 8, 2013, 11:48 AM   #33
Glenn E. Meyer
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Most forms of color blindness are X-linked recessives and that's why more males are color blind. Interestingly females can be more color sensitive than males even in the normal color perceiving population. Some might even be tetrachromatic as compared to trichromatic and have better wavelength discrimination.

That's fairly new in the literature and not fully worked out.

Most mammals outside of the primates have crappy color vision. The old world primates have the best but some new world females monkeys have decent color vision.

If you look at nonmammals you can find great color vision in some.

It's been evolutionary traced. Mammals lost good color vision and it re-evolved in the primates (us).
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Old September 9, 2013, 08:51 AM   #34
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I don't get one point here

OP you still have not elaborated on the need for safety clothing in range training. Are you implying that all participants in range training should be wearing safety colored clothing?
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Old September 9, 2013, 06:29 PM   #35
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I would say its very helpful for rangemasters at rifle ranges so they can clearly spot everyone. Eventually you have to go downrange to get the target and on that occasion you want to be clearly seen. At a pistol range it may not be that necessary, but its still good to stand out clearly to everyone. The rangemaster above all should be highly visible.
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Old September 10, 2013, 08:40 AM   #36
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Rifle Ranges

I have very limited experience at formal rifle ranges perhaps your knowledge base here is different than mine. I do have experience with pistol training both professional and recreational. All the times I have shot a rifle at a range with others whomever needed to go down range would announce that fact to everyone and get acknowledgement from everyone prior to doing so. Once that person was safely behind the line they would announce that fact and everyone could go on about their business.

In carbine or shotgun classes I would imagine that it would be handled the same as it is in a pistol class. No one leaves the line until the range master says so.

In any case it can't hurt. I just feel that if we are relying on safety colored clothing to keep us safe at the range we have missed a few fail safes along the way. It takes no extra effort to throw on a safety vest or colored shirt so if it helps it helps.
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Old September 11, 2013, 01:59 AM   #37
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Quote:
Anyone who is color blind should seriously consider not involving themselves in hunting.
I am colorblind. A brightly colored vest or hat might not seem as bright as a person with normal color vision would see it, but neither is anything else I see. So it is still a massive contrast and noticeable. Being red/green colorblind (dont remember which technical name for it) Yellow does stand out best, but orange is still bright. On the other hand when I was a VW technician and I had to find the blue wire with the red tracer in a 4 inch thick bundle or wires...well lets just say I didn't like dealing with electrical issues.
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Old September 11, 2013, 03:43 AM   #38
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The main safety at any range is the range safety officer or the rangemaster. At more organized professional or military ranges there is always one and this person is in charge of your safety. If you are shooting at less organized ranges which lack one then you should appoint one of your friends as the rangemaster and make sure to read up on the range protocols.

It sounds like you are shooting without anyone in charge of safety and with loose protocols. While this might be the fun way to do things, its not safe. One non shooting person should be tasked with supervising the range and who will give commands on movement and when to shoot. I wouldnt rely on simply telling your buddies you are going down range but making sure there is an established protocol. There is always that one guy who isnt listening so thats why you have a rangemaster and strict protocols...
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Old September 11, 2013, 10:55 AM   #39
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Quote:
red/green colorblind (dont remember which technical name for it)
There are several types of red/green color blindess based on whether the medium or long wave cone is missing, leaving the other to pair with the short wave cone. There are also forms where all three cones are present but the pigments in one or more of them can have a different spectral sensitivity function than normal. This leads to decreased color sensitivity.

If you want techy stuff - the wiki entries will explain it. Tests can determine the specific type.
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Old September 11, 2013, 07:26 PM   #40
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Everyone is in charge of safety

Quote:
It sounds like you are shooting without anyone in charge of safety and with loose protocols.
Everyone I shoot with is in charge of safety. We all check with each other before doing anything. There are only a handful of us and we all know what is happening.

Like I said usually we do pistol drills and in that situation we are drilling each other. Each person comes up with a task and he or she leads that part of the exercise.

Regards, GMB
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Old September 12, 2013, 11:56 AM   #41
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So how are deer at seeing "Safety Lime Yellow"?
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