The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > Hogan's Alley > Handguns: The Revolver Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old August 29, 2013, 11:04 AM   #1
Poindexter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 2, 2009
Location: Interior Alaska
Posts: 150
Thinking out loud about a bbq gun

Hey y'all.

I have two revolvers now, a 4" redhawk in 45 Colt for field carry and a 3.75" birdshead New Vaquero in 45 Colt as my appendiceal carry CCW.

I am thinking about a third gun, for open carry around town.

I am a working man, so a full on 100% engraved coverage with grip panels from the first elephant I took in Africa as a teenager ain't happening. I have never been to Africa and I don't see taking an elephant happening in this lifetime.

Rather than Texas style BBQ I am saving up for more of a "bbq" gun.

So far I am thinking a 4.75" Colt SAA in blue/ case hardended chambered 45Colt of course with "about" 25% engraving coverage and "something" for grips.

The look I want is "this gun belonged to my great great grandfather and ain't it cool."

For the engraving I am thinking I'll spread the 25% coverage around pretty even with a little curlicue here and there all over rather than slather one area and leave other areas plain. I have looked at hundreds of images on google and haven't seen the engraving I want yet, I might need to ask Colt to do like 15% coverage or something....

I am torn on grips too. I really want elk with some bark or walrus ivory or something, but every one I talk to is telling me all those sorts of grips (big horn sheep horn, buffalo horn) will shrink or crack or peel or something. What I am hearing is for an item to last many generations I really need either plastic (no) or wood stabilized in an epoxy bath.

So, does anyone know of an engraved gun that looks manly and cared for, valued, without looking like a museum piece or overdone?

What about oak as a grip material? I have some really really nice hybrid oak pieces just loaded with rays, just amazing stuff when quartersawn. I understand oak is quite porous and somewhat heavy comared to walnut- but really, is it that heavy? Can the epoxy not fill up the pores completely?

Right now I am looking at burl maple, birdseye maple or maybe holly among the woods that have been used before, but I don't love any of them.

Probably two years to complete this project, assuming the dishwasher really does break next time it makes that funny noise.

Ideas welcome.
Poindexter is offline  
Old August 29, 2013, 11:26 AM   #2
Dragline45
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 30, 2010
Posts: 2,485
Since this will be a BBQ gun and for open carry and will likely spend most of it's time holstered, I think the most important aspect will be the grip's as that will be seen the most. As far as engraving, I think a spot you should certainly get engraved is the back strap of the grip, because once again that will be seen the most.

Quote:
For the engraving I am thinking I'll spread the 25% coverage around pretty even with a little curlicue here and there all over rather than slather one area and leave other areas plain.
To be honest, I don't think that would look very good. I have seen engraving like that, and it always just looked unfinished to me and always left me thinking why did they even bother. I know engraving is expensive, and I can't blame you for not wanting to fork over the dough for a full engraving job because I know right now I certainly could not afford it. If you don't want the full gun in heavy engraving I would get the cylinder and the back strap engraved with maybe a little on the barrel.

Last edited by Dragline45; August 29, 2013 at 11:37 AM.
Dragline45 is offline  
Old August 29, 2013, 12:47 PM   #3
Poindexter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 2, 2009
Location: Interior Alaska
Posts: 150
Thanks for the opinion dragline, I haven't seen one like that yet. I can visualize the "why bother" look though, thanks.

Poking around on the net the 100% coverage is just not what I am looking for.

The 75% coverage, just too much.

I know this is going to cost, but I just wouldn't want that much on this gun even if it was "free."

The 50% coverage guns are starting looking like "just a little too much", and the 25% coverage guns are starting to look (to me) like they have "enough" engraving on 'em, I just haven't cared for the way it is spread around.
Poindexter is offline  
Old August 29, 2013, 01:48 PM   #4
lamarw
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 12, 2010
Location: Lake Martin, AL
Posts: 1,758
No disrespect intended, but you are about to be the Jim Dandy of your town. You might want to find an antique 18 size pocket watch and watch fob or chain to go with it.

I have a collection of pocket watches and have worn a few from time to time. They certainly will draw the eye of those around you. I suspect a handgun will be even more conspicuous.
lamarw is online now  
Old August 29, 2013, 02:44 PM   #5
twobit
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 25, 2010
Location: Coyote Creak, SW Texas
Posts: 567
For a holster for a 'peacemaker" or clone I recommend the Mernickle PS6SA

http://www.mernickleholsters.com/ps/bwcc_saa.html

I have a Cimarron 5 1/2" Artillery Model 45 colt and one of those holsters.
It is in Saddle Tan color. Here is a pic of the holster and gun.
__________________
Twobit,
LEO, NRA member, Native Texan. Shooting and hunting for over 49 years!
twobit is offline  
Old August 29, 2013, 02:56 PM   #6
m&p45acp10+1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 3, 2009
Location: Central Texas
Posts: 3,310
For a real deal BBQ gun it is a big time rule that it must be in a fancy looking rig. Preferably adorned with the hide of a critter that would make the PETA folks wet thier pants when they see it. A clone gun would work just as well. Then you can actualy afford to have it engraved, or a case hardened finsih applied. A nice set of sanbar stag grips, or well carved wood, with engraving that matches either the gun, or holster. Extra bling points if all 3 have a matching design scheeme. If you have boots, and a cow boy hat band that all go with the gun, and holster you are in buisness.

Ok all that asside. I would say as long as it looks real nice it would work well for you.

Oh and the old school Texas Rangers had a BBQ gun for the anual BBQ. It would be the flashiest one they have. (No keeping up with the Jones' on them. More like one upping the Jones', and the Smith's kind of gun.)

They would also have a nice hoster, and gun that were more toned down, but still real nice for going to court. It was called the "court gun."

Then they had thier work gun.
__________________
No matter how many times you do it and nothing happens it only takes something going wrong one time to kill you.
m&p45acp10+1 is offline  
Old August 29, 2013, 03:30 PM   #7
newfrontier45
Junior member
 
Join Date: February 23, 2012
Posts: 921
Quote:
I really want elk with some bark or walrus ivory or something, but every one I talk to is telling me all those sorts of grips (big horn sheep horn, buffalo horn) will shrink or crack or peel or something. What I am hearing is for an item to last many generations I really need either plastic (no) or wood stabilized in an epoxy bath.
This is simply not true. Ivory will shrink over 100yrs if not maintained but a light application of mineral oil once or twice a year is not much to ask. I suspect the same of sheep horn. It's all tough stuff and will last generations if cared for. Same with wood. Oak is far too plain for an engraved gun.

I agree with you on the engraving. I don't care for 100% coverage at all but prefer 50-75%. I don't see a problem with 25% either if done properly. If you're torn on coverage, you can be very specific on the parts you want engraved and where you want your spaces to be. I like engraving at the breech end of the barrel and at the muzzle but with some space in-between. While I think an unembellished hammer, loading gate, ejector housing or grip frame looks unfinished. I specified that I wanted those parts done, as well as the sides of the triggerguard and the "shovel". I don't see why you couldn't get that done on a 4¾" SAA for well under $500. I have a sixgun with Michael Gouse right now receiving 75% coverage in American scroll in the Helfricht style and it will be done shortly. Then it's going to Turnbull for finish work and the whole thing shouldn't much more than 4-6wks.

http://www.gousefreelancefirearmsengraving.com/

Jim Downing is also very well reputed.

http://www.thegunengraver.com/
newfrontier45 is offline  
Old August 29, 2013, 03:32 PM   #8
Ibmikey
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 1, 2013
Location: Medical Lake Wa.
Posts: 522
Go to the Texas Ranger museum in Waco....ya gotta' have a 1911 or SAA as the foundation. 44-40 or 38 Super would add to the glitter...engraving..nickel, ivory or stag etc...then you would be cool.
Ibmikey is offline  
Old August 29, 2013, 03:42 PM   #9
Rob62
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 28, 1999
Location: Georgia, USA
Posts: 426
Not sure how much I can contribute to the thread. But here are a few of my thoughts.

First a BBQ gun has to be big, a snubby .38 Special will not cut it. Next it should be something shiny. Stainless steel is great but nickel plated would probably be preferable.

And absolutely without question it has to be worn in a nice strong side, LEATHER, belt holster.

Regards,
Rob
__________________
NRA & NAHC Life Member
Rob62 is offline  
Old August 29, 2013, 06:10 PM   #10
Poindexter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 2, 2009
Location: Interior Alaska
Posts: 150
Thanks for the idea of a "court gun" as a step up from the working gun, but not all out like a BBQ gun.

Not that I'll be carrying a gun into a courthouse anytime soon.
Poindexter is offline  
Old August 29, 2013, 07:36 PM   #11
Bob Wright
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 10, 2012
Location: Memphis, Tennessee
Posts: 1,864
First of all, as to grips, I abhor stabilized wood. Oil finished walnut remains my ideal grip material. Such as these:



This incidentally, is my BBQ gun:



On my side every Wednesday as I go to the Three Little Pigs.


Bob Wright
Bob Wright is offline  
Old August 30, 2013, 08:08 AM   #12
twobit
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 25, 2010
Location: Coyote Creak, SW Texas
Posts: 567
Bob I agree on the grips. Since I took that photo of my Cimarron, I have removed the polyurethane from the walnut grips and oiled them down. They now look like those from the 1800's. I always wondered "why make a replica of a peacemaker and put poly on the wood grips?" Come to think of it, all my wooden stocked firearms have an oil finish.
I see you have the same holster. Nice aren't they. Simply Rugged makes some nice cartridge pouches also. Their pancake holster, however, is not as fancy as the Mernickle. I have both brands of holster. SR's pancake does protect the gun more and I carry it in that when out in the pasture.
__________________
Twobit,
LEO, NRA member, Native Texan. Shooting and hunting for over 49 years!
twobit is offline  
Old August 30, 2013, 10:48 AM   #13
rodfac
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 22, 2005
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 1,518
Nice lookin' guns, Bob, you've got good taste in revolvers! And the grips are first rate, pretty as pictures...and while I do love walnut with a good grain or burl, I've seen some other woods that make up into a nice pair of grips...the ones below, gracing a NV in .45 Colt, I made up out of piece of crab apple from a friends wood pile. Love that flame grain...The others were cut from scraps laying about my woodshop....Best Regards, Rod

Crab Apple

Rosewood

Burl Walnut
__________________
Our Flag does not fly because the wind blows against it, it is moved instead, by the dying breath of our patriots in uniform. Our Freedom is not free, it's been paid for many times over.
USAF Forward Air Controller, 5th Spl Forces,
An Loc, lll Corps, RVN, 69-70, Vietnam Vet '69-'73
rodfac is offline  
Old September 2, 2013, 12:38 AM   #14
5whiskey
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 23, 2005
Location: US
Posts: 1,561
First off, I'm with you in that I don't like guns with 100% (or 75%) engraving. I do agree that 25% may not be enough if distributed evenly over the whole gun. 33-50% may be okay if tastefully done. Alas, my personal opinion is that I would weight the engraving more toward rear of the gun with just a tasteful touch on the barrel.

I would use polished bone for the grips, personally. The mother of pearl grips have always turned me off, but good polished bone or ivory (I'm a bit of a conservationist so I would prefer the bone) tastefully done would look good and last quite a while. If you went with wood, it wouldn't be oak. I would want a good grained cherry or knurled English Walnut personally. Also, I think contrast helps a BBQ gun quite a bit. For example, a blued or case hardened finish with polished trigger and hammer. I'm not into gold plated accessories, though.

+1 on the the matching holster. Plus, one other accessory would really set it off. The hat band was a good idea.
5whiskey is offline  
Old September 2, 2013, 11:15 AM   #15
Sgt127
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 13, 2002
Posts: 616


This would be my BBQ gun. The only engraving is my name, rank, badge number and Department.

Perhaps your initials gold inlaid in the sideplate or the backstrap?

El Paso is a good go to source for BBQ rigs.



Bit much?
Sgt127 is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:03 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.10453 seconds with 9 queries