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Old July 22, 2013, 11:34 AM   #1
rrruger
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New to Shotguns

I am the proud owner of a Mossberg 500 20 gauge. I love 'almost' everything about it. The magazine feed tube is sharp and tends to catch the edge of shells that I feed into it. I am often forced to turn the gun on it's side to 'see' where I'm loading the shell. Would any of you suggest grinding a bevel on the inside of the feed tube to open it up a bit? Is here a better approach?
Before you suggest "Practice", I have been doing that, and it aint getting any easier.
Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
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Old July 22, 2013, 12:22 PM   #2
PetahW
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I would suggest you keep loading rounds into it (aka: shoot more), since that's the best way to wear off any sharp edges left on a new gun after the manufacturing process.

An alternative might be to try a different type/brand of shotshell (body).

FWIW, I've been shooting repeaters for some 50-odd years, and have always flipped my pump & autoloaders upside-down to load & unload the magazines.



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Old July 22, 2013, 01:30 PM   #3
BigD_in_FL
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If you open that feed tube "up a bit" you might make it so it does not hold the shells in the tube at all.

If has such a sharp edge that it is cutting, some sandpaper or similar on a dowel can be used to smooth it ever so slightly
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Old July 22, 2013, 02:00 PM   #4
g.willikers
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Here's a schematic for your shotgun.
http://www.brownells.com/schematics/...ge-sid161.aspx
In addition to the mag tube, there are other essential parts for loading and keeping the rounds in the mag.
Check out parts 11, 12, and 18.
They are the elevator for guiding and lifting rounds.
The cartridge intercepter and cartridge stop for controlling rounds coming out of the mag.
The shapes are critical, so be careful with messing with them.
Or you could wind up with rounds flying all over the place and jamming the works.
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Old July 24, 2013, 12:21 PM   #5
Hawg
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Quote:
FWIW, I've been shooting repeaters for some 50-odd years, and have always flipped my pump & autoloaders upside-down to load & unload the magazines.
Likewise. Well for 45 years anyway.
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Old July 24, 2013, 04:12 PM   #6
Louca
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Quote:
The magazine feed tube is sharp and tends to catch the edge of shells that I feed into it.
Same thing happened to me on my Winchester SXP Defender. I used some sandpaper wrapped around a short piece of wooden dowel rod to de-burr the edge of the feed tube. Now it loads smooth as butter. I would de-burr and maybe polish anything the cartridge comes in contact with as it loads.

For those that would suggest taking care of it by just shooting more, I would argue that, with the cost of ammo being what it is, you could probably hire a gunsmith to de-burr it for you for less expense. Before I de-burred mine, I had run several rounds through it and it was no better than when I started.

Lou
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Old July 24, 2013, 04:17 PM   #7
gwpercle
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Take the sharp edges off with a little wet-or-dry paper or emery cloth, that should help. Take it down and inspect (feel) for any sharp edges or burrs, smooth them off with 400 grit , polish with 600 grit. Stay away from grinder, when working on guns don't remove a lot of metal at one time, a grinder will have you buying a new tube before you know it.

Gary
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Old July 24, 2013, 04:47 PM   #8
Hawg
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I had run several rounds through it and it was no better than when I started.
It takes more than several rounds. Try several hundred but you can just cycle them through the action without firing them.
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Old July 24, 2013, 05:04 PM   #9
Louca
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It takes more than several rounds. Try several hundred but you can just cycle them through the action without firing them.
Yeah, that's what I did, but used some dummy rounds. Then my thumb got sore!

But if several hundred (let's say 400) are needed, at 24 cents/round that would be $96. I am sure a gunsmith would do it for less than that.

Lou
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Old July 25, 2013, 07:57 AM   #10
PetahW
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Most of those (inexpensive) gunsmiths are long gone............


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