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Old July 20, 2013, 11:18 PM   #1
TennJed
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Ruger Single Ten bore size

I have not found any concrete information on the bore size of the Single Ten. All I have read has been speculation. Has anyone actually measured or seen any official word from Ruger on this. Are they using the larger 22mag barrel like the Single Six? I know it is debatable on if it makes any real difference in accuracy, but I am curious.
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Old July 21, 2013, 05:08 AM   #2
CajunBass
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I don't know for sure, but it doesn't make business sense to inventory two different barrel blanks, for what for all intents and purposes are the same gun.

Just a SWAG, but I'd say they're the same.

I know. More speculation.
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Old July 21, 2013, 08:34 AM   #3
NoSecondBest
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This has been talked about a thousand times on Rimfirecentral.com and the people who have contacted Ruger have been told that they are one and the same dimension. Also, a few of the really in depth shooters have measured the actual barrel dimension and measured the actual bullet dimensions and the specs overlap! Myself, having shot competition for many years and having owned a few Rugers with interchangable cylinders have never found any shortcomings in accuracy with either cylinder being used. The type of ammo being used in your gun will have the biggest effect on accuracy. They don't make any true target 22wmr ammo so it usually doesn't shoot quite as well for that reason alone.
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Old July 21, 2013, 12:51 PM   #4
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I gave you the answer over at the other forum, and Iowegan confirmed it. If you dont believe me, certainly believe him.
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Old July 21, 2013, 02:05 PM   #5
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Ruger only uses .224" barrels.

For a .224"-nominal bore, SAAMI standards allow 0.224" to 0.226". But, I wouldn't be surprised to see a few barrels on the tight side and loose side slipping through, with all the demand they've had over the last few years.
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Old July 21, 2013, 02:12 PM   #6
Ricklin
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I own a convertible single six. I believe the larger bore size hurts the accuracy of the .22 LR rounds.
No I have not done any in depth testing, just my humble opinion from years of plinking with both mag and LR rounds.

YMMV
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Old July 21, 2013, 02:15 PM   #7
James K
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The main reason for the nominal difference and the warnings about not firing .22 WMR in a .22 LR barrel had nothing to do with the actual barrel diameter, but with the fact that most barrels made for .22 LR were of soft steel and the high-velocity, jacketed .22 WMR would ruin them in a short time. I am sure Ruger's barrels are all hardened to take the .22 WMR and the minor and meaningless (and often non-existent) dimensional difference is of no importance.

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Old July 21, 2013, 04:21 PM   #8
newfrontier45
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IMHO, these guns were never intended to be target pistols. They do not receive the painstaking care that S&W and Colt put into their .22 revolvers +50yrs ago. I believe any issue with accuracy in the Single Sixes has more to do with the way Ruger makes and fits cylinders than the bore diameter. Cylinders are made in big batches and up until recently, all chambers were reamed at once. Cylinders were taken from a parts bin and if it functioned, that was enough.
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Old July 21, 2013, 09:57 PM   #9
weblance
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Reading my post later this evening, it sounds like I was being snarky. I meant no harm, please dont take offense to what I posted.
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Old July 21, 2013, 10:34 PM   #10
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No offense taken here, but I would like to know what was said on the "other forum".

Those Rugers are seldom (well, never) used on the target ranges because a single action's long hammer fall, poor trigger and lack of adjustable sights rule them out for serious target work. Barrel quality has little to do with it. Those who want a target pistol should consider one of the fine semi-auto target pistols made by Ruger and others.

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Old July 21, 2013, 10:48 PM   #11
newfrontier45
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In 30yrs of shooting single actions, I've never seen any real evidence that locktime was an issue whatsoever. If my guns have bad triggers (crisp 2lbs) I'd hate to feel a nice one. The Ruger in question, along with a few hundred thousand Super Single Sixes, has adjustable sights. There are other reasons SA's aren't used for competition and accuracy isn't one of them. The most accurate revolvers in the world are single actions.


Quote:
I would like to know what was said on the "other forum".
"TennJed, Same findings as weblance ... .224" bore for Single-Nines and Single-Tens, and Single-Sixes. Here's a quickie test. A 7/32" drill bit shank will just fit in a .224" bore but is too large to fit in a .222" bore. Works every time.

I have an Old Model RSS-5 Single-Six, made in 1958 before convertibles came out. It has a .222" bore. My OM Convertible Single-Six (made in '74) has a .224" bore. My OM Bearcat also has a .222" bore but my New Bearcat has a .224" bore. So ... I think it's safe to assume that all current production 22 cal single action Rugers have a .224" bore. My MK Series pistols and 10/22s all have .222" bores as does my SR-22P.

The good news is ... all cylinders for 22 Ruger SAs have .224" throats. This allows the soft lead bullet to bump up in diameter (obturate) to fit the bore better. I've found using a Paco Kelly tool will make the bullet diameter .224" and will shoot match grade accuracy in my Single-Sixes ... way better than standard .222" sized bullets."
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Old July 21, 2013, 11:32 PM   #12
TennJed
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Ruger Single Ten bore size

Quote:
Originally Posted by weblance View Post
Reading my post later this evening, it sounds like I was being snarky. I meant no harm, please dont take offense to what I posted.
No offense taken, but I posted the tread at the same time on each forum. I did not have the answer when I created it. I posted on more than one forum to increase my odds of getting the correct answer. You also get the added benefit of getting lots of discussion that is not an exact answer. So getting as much feedback from all the knowledgeable people of these forum is great

Thanks everybody
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Old July 22, 2013, 06:20 PM   #13
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Thanks, Newfrontier45.

I can't help but wonder, in your experience, how many single actions you have used or seen used in serious competition. I used to hang around some of the top ranges (I even tried competing some but was never very good at it), and in recent years hardly even saw any revolvers, let alone a Single Six or other single action. Perhaps they were used somewhere else, but not by folks who were thinking about state or national championships.

Of course, they are great plinkers, and someone like yourself would probably do well in local shooting contests, but when points count at the top levels, a Ruger Single Ten is not going to cut it, not even with a 2 (!) pound trigger pull.

Jim
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Old July 22, 2013, 07:18 PM   #14
Daggitt
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Be careful about such generalizations. I've seen more than one old boy step out of the backwoods with a single action revolver that's been to hell and back and beat the proverbial pants off a professional sharpshooter and his $4000 custom target pistol. It ain't all about the gun. Skill is seriously intimidating. Beware the guy with one gun.
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Old July 22, 2013, 07:20 PM   #15
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Perhaps some of you aren't aware of IHMSA silhouette matches. There is a revolver category at these shoots. I haven't shot it in years but when I went to the International Shoot a couple of times there were literally hundreds of shooters from all over the US and even some from other countries. The revolver category shot the same targets as the automatics and single shots. I personally shot a score of 77x80 and came in third place in the revolver category. It was another seventeen places down before another Ruger placed a score. The Rugers can shoot but they usually don't do it unless the parts are hand fitted at the factory. FYI...I owned several S&W 22lr revolvers and none of them shot as well as the Ruger did. That's why I used the Ruger in competition.
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Old July 22, 2013, 10:53 PM   #16
newfrontier45
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I do believe I said in my first post that the Single Six (or Ten) was never meant to be a target pistol. Must I quote myself???

Quote:
IMHO, these guns were never intended to be target pistols. They do not receive the painstaking care that S&W and Colt put into their .22 revolvers +50yrs ago. I believe any issue with accuracy in the Single Sixes has more to do with the way Ruger makes and fits cylinders than the bore diameter. Cylinders are made in big batches and up until recently, all chambers were reamed at once. Cylinders were taken from a parts bin and if it functioned, that was enough.
You can make whatever generalizations (again) you want about competition but no double action in the world short of a Korth will hang with a Freedom Arms for accuracy. Period.

That said, I find no discernible difference in accuracy potential between Ruger single actions, Ruger double actions and any S&W I've ever shot. Unlike most folks here, I thoroughly bench test all my revolvers and never go by a seat of the pants impression. In the list of factors affecting the accuracy of a revolver, locktime is at the bottom. The factors that do affect accuracy, are common to all revolvers and not at all exclusive to single actions.
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