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Old June 17, 2013, 03:08 PM   #1
Deadboyreloads
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does handgun brass make a difference in accuracy?

If Im loading 45 auto and the only component I change is the brass will I still get the same accuracy or does it make a difference?
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Old June 17, 2013, 03:20 PM   #2
Guggmeister
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does brass make a difference in accuracy?

Yes. Does it matter for practical purposes? No.
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Old June 17, 2013, 03:24 PM   #3
TATER
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Short answer,
With practical shooting, not to any degree you would notice with .45acp.
I would be more concerned with the bullet.
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Old June 17, 2013, 03:33 PM   #4
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In handguns at handgun ranges, not enough to notice unless you're competing for a world title. In rifles at long range (long range meaning well passed your average 100-yard plinker), it can make a huge difference--but then again, EVERYTHING makes a difference in that case.
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Old June 19, 2013, 05:35 AM   #5
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common answer: "Not likely"

So the actual answer is "Perhaps; must test from your gun."
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Old June 19, 2013, 10:25 AM   #6
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Uniformity in your ammo is the goal in handloading for accuracy. The brass casing is a pressure vessel of a given dimension or volume. To the extent that you maintain consistent volume in your pressure vessel, and consistent charge weights and seating depth, you are well on your way to consistent ammo that will shoot accurately.

From a safety perspective, variables in the volume of your pressure vessel, or in bullet weight or diameter, can increase pressures to unsafe levels. For low pressure cartridges such as 45 ACP, the margins of safety are greater, so changes in the volume of your pressure vessel will be less likely to have a catastrophic effect. My suggestion is that if you are using mixed headstamps, find a powder charge of a slower burning powder, in the middle of the range which is adequate to cycle the action, to build in a little cushion of safety.

If you were to use max charges of fast burning powder, with mixed headstamp cases, and heavy for cartridge projectile, you are treading closer to disaster than you might be aware...

My $.02. Hope this helps.

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Old June 20, 2013, 06:35 AM   #7
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Quote:
Uniformity in your ammo is the goal in handloading for accuracy.
Some handloaders seem to either forgotten than, or never new it in the first place. All the same, shoot the same.
Which is better, a six inch group at 25 yards or a two inch group?
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Old June 20, 2013, 06:52 AM   #8
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With regards to handgun competition brass has the least effect on accuracy. If you ever get to the point that brass is a factor then use a dedicated allocation for the real matches.
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Old June 20, 2013, 07:04 AM   #9
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With regards to handgun competition brass has the least effect on accuracy. If you ever get to the point that brass is a factor then use a dedicated allocation for the real matches.
So you say, but in my experience since the '60's, with .32 S&W Long, 38 spl, .357, 38 Super, 9MM (several), .41 Mag.(four different), .44 Spl (two different)., .44 Magnum, 45 ACP (three different), .45 Colt (two different), they each "preferred" (shot best with a particular head-stamp case). That was determined by testing with a rest, from the bench. I shot a lot of bowling pins. When practicing, I would want to know if the miss was because of me, or because the mixed head-stamp cases were not producing a tight group. Even if shooting beer cans, I would want to know if it was me. If you just want the gun to go "bang", then there is no practical reason to sort by head stamp, none at all.

Note: I could not find a load using Winchester or Remington brass that my Browning High Power liked. I found that a load using S&B brass shot best in it, of all things. As a dedicated handloader, that was a matter of frustration inasmuch as S&B does not offer empty cases as a handloading component...I had to buy loaded and/or scrounge range brass to get it.
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Old June 20, 2013, 09:06 AM   #10
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You could also clean primer pockets and trim brass. For most shooters this would be a total waste of time.
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Old June 20, 2013, 09:28 AM   #11
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I found that a load using S&B brass shot best in it, of all things.
Not that unusual they both are/where made overseas. What you think FNH uses Winchester White Box for testing. (LOL)

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Old June 20, 2013, 10:13 AM   #12
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That S&B brass is somehow inferior to other makers' brass is news to me. I've never had any issues either with their loaded ammo or their brass. Seems to be every bit as accurate and consistent as anything I've run through by Federal, Remington, Winchester, etc.
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Old June 20, 2013, 01:57 PM   #13
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The answer is always depends. I mean what do they or do they not do when shot from your gun. I shoot nothing but mixed brass reloaded I don't know how many times and everything is as accurate as I need it to be.

During general target practice I have very nice groups from 10 - 25 yards, they work well in practical events and hit ever can I shoot at on the farm.

But that is from my gun loaded the with the same bullet, powder and primer over and over again.

If I was shooting something like bulls eye I may be a little more consistent and they may include the same cases and probably new or at least I would know how many times they were reloaded.

So just because they work with with my gun they may not for you.
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Old June 21, 2013, 06:39 PM   #14
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45acp brass of all the same lot will be more accurate than mixed range pick-ups. Brass at the maximum trim length of .898" will be more accurate than shorter brass. This may only matter in Bullseye competitions, where the firearm is accurate enough to see the difference. 3" groups or smaller at 50 yards are required.
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Old June 22, 2013, 01:56 AM   #15
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Depends on caliber too. I'd wager that 9mm is more volume sensitive than .45ACP. Best 9mm reloads I ever made were in matched 9mm Nato brass. i don't normally sort handgun brass but I tried a run just to see.
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