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Old May 28, 2013, 10:28 PM   #26
longrange08
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tools

I do not claim to know everything about gunsmithing. But I know enough that Remington trusted me to be the head gunsmith for their east coast warranty center. That being said, before you buy a screwdriver,stone,file,hammer,bench block, punches or any other tools..... Buy BOOKS. They will as a beginner, and continue to be throughout your ENTIRE career the most important tool that you own.
When working on guns it is never what you know... it is what you do not know that will get your tail in a bind real quick. Feel free to ask any other professional gunsmiths, and im sure they will agree. When working on guns there are VERY RARELY any small, or minor mistakes. It would seem in my experience that when something goes wrong on a firearm. It goes very wrong. So the best thing you can do as a gunsmith is make sure you have taught yourself everything you need to know about a particular job before you go diving in head first, s that you do not get blind sided by some very small, very minor piece of information you did not know about before hand.
One small case in point. I had a local amateur gunsmith bring me a ORIGINAL 1886 Winchester deluxe grade rifle to "repair". One of his customers brought it to him to clean. He decided to disassemble it to clean it. He did not know AHEAD of time that the mag tube retaining ring is rotary cut. NOT a dovetail cut. These two cuts look very similar but disassemble VERY differently. One is turned, one is pushed. Long story short. He hammered it out. instead of twisted it out. he turned a 7000$ rifle into a 2000$ rifle because of one very, very tiny piece of information he didnt know ahead of time. Had he read the disassembly instructions in his BOOKS, ahead of time... well you get the point.
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Old May 29, 2013, 05:21 AM   #27
Grizz12
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can you recommend some books?
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Old May 29, 2013, 08:41 AM   #28
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Gunsmithing by Roy F. Dunlap is a good one: http://www.amazon.com/Gunsmithing-Co...smithing+books
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Old May 29, 2013, 09:02 AM   #29
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Book about books...

Midwayusa sells this book:

"Building Your Gunsmithing Library: An Indexed Review of Gunsmithing Books

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/229...-reid-coffield

FWIW...

...bug
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Old May 29, 2013, 10:15 AM   #30
longrange08
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books.

books, believe it or not. i think the best 40$ you can spend on books would be to call jack first gunparts and order their 3 volume parts catalog.1) you will need it to order parts from them.2) for 40$ you get 3 huge volumes of parts diagrams for basically every gun out there. the book exploded gun diagrams cost 35$ and doesnt have half the amount of diagrams. just my 2 cents
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Old May 29, 2013, 11:09 AM   #31
III-Percent
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Interesting article on gunsmithing books: http://www.gunreports.com/special_re...als1620-1.html
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Old May 29, 2013, 11:18 AM   #32
4V50 Gary
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Agree that good books are needed. It helps with assembly and disassembly. Jerry Kuhnhausen's books are among the best for service manuals.
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Old May 29, 2013, 11:46 AM   #33
Dixie Gunsmithing
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A must have book on assembly and disassembly is The Encyclopedia of Modern Firearms by Brownells. It has the original factory manuals from Winchester and Remington, plus a huge amount from the military, along with a bunch of parts diagrams. It has most of the collectible guns in it, but not the most modern.

http://www.brownells.com/books-video...-prod1691.aspx

For reprints of older manuals, and parts books, go to Cornell Publications.

http://www.cornellpubs.com/
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Old May 29, 2013, 02:10 PM   #34
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A real gunsmith uses the lathe more than the mill, but I am not a real gunsmith.

I use the mill every day and the lathe every two weeks.

lately I have been making my own scope mounts, rings, and reloading dies. The dies are made on the lathe.
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Old June 17, 2013, 01:54 PM   #35
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Sardine cans for parts !!!

A very helpful tool in my shop, are empty sardine cans or tins as well as tuna cans. You can use them for soaking parts, sorting and storing them so they don't roll off your bench. They are really handing for keeping parts in one secure place. Of course there is the added benefit of eating the sardines. I especially like the Kipper snacks and their tins. .....

Be Fugal and;
Be Safe !!!
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Old June 17, 2013, 07:05 PM   #36
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Since sardine cans were mentioned (and I use one to hold solvent when I clean guns), medicine or better yet, vitamin bottles are great for holding small parts for the same firearm. Label it so you won't get it confused with another bottle.
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Old June 17, 2013, 08:37 PM   #37
Dixie Gunsmithing
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I use large medicine bottles, too, and butter bowls for the larger parts. That way you can keep everything together when you take down a gun. I keep these with the gun all the way through, especially when polishing and bluing.
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Old June 17, 2013, 09:33 PM   #38
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In our vintage metal finishing class, our instructor used four cat food bowls to put the express blue solution in. Somewhere out there are four hungry kittys.

Those magnetic trays are very useful for disassembled guns. Everything sticks in them.

We buy those white color roll-up padded shelf liners to line our work benches with (Firearms Repair). That way there's contrast so we can find our parts when we place them down.
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Old June 17, 2013, 10:26 PM   #39
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On tins,the ones Altoids and other candies/breath mints come in are great.

If they still make disposable diapers that fold out flat,oil free,absorbent,sealed plastic backing.

A good 10x or 7x loupe,a streamlight stylus led penlight,a 1 in by 4 in fine india stone

Get a loaf pan,about 5 in by 8 in.Make a set on lid for it,sheet metal is fine.

Use 1/4 in mesh hardware cloth(steel screen) to make a false bottom about 1/2 in off the pan bottom.Fill it half way with fuel oil or kerosene.

Keep your polishing stones in it.

Pretty cheap,$25 or so,you can get a9 in by 12 in shop grade granite surface plate.That is the size of a sheet of wet or dry sandpaper.

You can use that to knock off high spots or flat sand a part.

Get an MSC,a Travers Tool,an Enco,and a McMaster Carr catalogue.If you need a two foot chunk of 2 in dia 8620 alloy steel,McMaster has it.

For some chemical jobs,a pyrex loaf pan is good.Amazon will sell you a stainless loaf pan,small parts Parkerizing

If you can find a shop that builds/services/repairs plastic injection molds

The lengths of ejector and core pins they cut off are a prize,as are junk and retired mold pieces.

Last edited by HiBC; June 17, 2013 at 10:33 PM.
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Old June 17, 2013, 10:45 PM   #40
Dixie Gunsmithing
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That's a good idea, on the shelf liner. What I use is drafting board covering. It has a light green, flat color that the parts stick out on, and since its rubber, it pads the whole gun. You used to be able to buy this at Office Depot, though I don't know if they still carry it. I think you can find it on eBay and Amazon, though. I bought extra when I last covered my drafting table, but that was a good while back.

I saw somewhere on the net, that a guy had fabricated wooden parts boxes for the guns in his shop, and they were made to hold every part, including the barrel. They kind of looked like a wood tool tote, like carpenters make up. They had them numbered, and they stayed with the gun through the work. I actually thought about making some of these myself.

Another trick, on storing buffing polish, is to buy the round, plastic, welding rod boxes. You need the 4" diameter ones, with the screw on tops, as they have a rubber o-ring, that seals them off to the air. They run about $11.00 each, but that's not bad for say, four sticks of polish. Just write the polish grit on them with a label, and you're all set. They'll hold a roll and 1/2 of polish.

I keep parts cleaner in one of those sealed containers, similar to Tupperware, but made by Zip-Lock (they're really cheap). The lid keeps you from spilling it, and it wont evaporate.
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Old June 18, 2013, 04:02 AM   #41
Old Stony
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I worked for years with about every available type of container around my shop for parts, patches, tools, and probably even ate a screw or two out of the old aspirin bottle on the back of the bench. Harbor freight sells those magnetic trays in different sizes and I have come to really appreciate them. A screw has a way of disappearing off your bench and you invariably end up on your knees with a flashlight using a language that you probably shouldn't even know. I'm getting too old and the knees too bad to be doing that anymore and hopefully I have learned a little along the way, so those trays get regular use with me nowdays.
How many guys have lost screws in their recliner working on guns while you are watching TV? You get them in the carpet and they can really be a bugger.
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Old June 18, 2013, 07:59 AM   #42
Dixie Gunsmithing
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The biggest thing I was always apt to lose was springs, and especially the followers. I ended up making a plywood box, with a top made of Plexiglas, and two arm holes, similar to a blast cabinet. If a spring gets loose, it falls to the drawer at the bottom of the box. I made it light enough to be easily portable, and I sit it off the bench when not in use.

The best thing I've found to retrieve screws and pins, are those magnets on the end of a rod, unless they're stainless or non magnetic. I have a high nose on the bench front, similar to a kitchen counter, and it keeps the parts from rolling off, but I still drop one occasionally. The back of the bench has a box built along its length, and houses electrical outlets, and two air hose connections, but that keeps the parts from rolling off the back.
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