The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Hide > The Dave McCracken Memorial Shotgun Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old June 9, 2013, 09:44 PM   #1
GunXpatriot
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 28, 2011
Location: New York
Posts: 318
First Time Shooting Trap Today! (with some questions?)

Well, as I said, today was the first time I shot trap. Really, it's the first time I've ever shot clays in a "legitimate" setting. Quite a few years ago, probably like 5 or 6, a guy invited my family and another family to shoot clays. He was charging us per shot, so I guess he was just hustling and making some money!

He had what appeared to be a pretty serious rig in his pickup truck. Looking back, I seemed to have shot better haha. We were shooting his Remington Versa Max, or at least I think it was, judging by the colors.

Now yes, this does tie into the questions I mentioned. I (well, my mom) had purchased a Mossberg 500 All-purpose about 5 months ago, and today, was the first time it had been shot. Now when I was in the store, I was going to go with a non-ported barrel, however, all they had was ported. After a little in-store research, I figured, since it was for sporting, it didn't matter much. I'd planned on having it double as a HD gun as well, but now, I'm not sure how I'd like to go about it.

Anyway, the guy in the LGS told me porting was good because it reduced muzzle climb and reduced recoil, or so he said.

The last time I shot my Marlin XL7 .30-06, a few months ago, and the time before that, which was about 10 months ago, I remember after just 20 rounds, I couldn't move my arm. I had the stock gun, with a 3-9x40 scope, which isn't adding a WHOLE lot of weight.

Back when I shot that Versa Max, although I was only about 12, I remember the recoil being fairly punishing. After only about 15 rounds, I couldn't take it anymore. Every shot after 10 hurt. A lot. I was just trying to stay "cool" and just finish the last rounds.

Anyway, so I'm shooting this ported Mossberg 500 All-purpose with a 28 inch barrel, and it was actually very comfortable to shoot. I shot 50 rounds. Now, after 50 rounds, I started to feel slightly uncomfortable, but I could have easily shot another box. What was bothering more, was the fatigue in my left arm from holding up the shotgun at my side between shots. For my last 5 shots or so, I could hardly lift the gun. Honestly, I was glad when I was done! When I was eating, both arms were giving me a little trouble a shaking a slight. ANYWAY....

I shot 15 the first time, and next, I didn't have enough shells for another round, so I just went solo for 20 rounds and shot 16/20. I also was getting the hang of "swinging past" the target, or whatever you'd call it. Even still, I would find myself snapping to the target like it was stationary. I was using Federal value pack "Multi-purpose" loads sold in the box of 100, like this.

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Federal-Am...roduct+Reviews

To my surprise, this ammo was actually hotter than other target loads I'd bought to try, but I figured I shouldn't switch ammo mid-session, so I just brought 50 rounds of those.

So my real question is, does a ported barrel really make that much of a difference recoil-wise? I understand the physics behind reducing muzzle climb, but does that reduced climb have anything to do with less felt recoil? Is that simply a matter of me being 12 vs me being 17 now? Like I said, that .30-06 had some stout recoil for me, I could only fire 1/5th the ammo with the same level of comfort. Can anyone explain this?

Trap shooting really isn't easy to do, or at least not like these pros can do it. And if there's one thing that I found really satisfying, it's getting a solid hit and shattering a clay, rather than chipping it or just breaking it into a few pieces.

So yeah, I just wanted to share my experience and ask that question, is all. Actually, I made this post kind of long, but I guess I just had a really good time!

Now I'd like to try Skeet, which I hear is just a whole 'nother animal!
GunXpatriot is offline  
Old June 9, 2013, 10:39 PM   #2
Method
Member
 
Join Date: July 6, 2012
Location: Omaha, NE
Posts: 73
Be careful with skeet...you might end up like me and get addicted. As it turns out, when I first got into skeet shooting just about a year ago, I found a good used sporting shotgun with ported barrels.

Personally, I didn't notice any difference with porting. Some people say they do, others not so much. In my limited experience, porting of the barrel is more trouble than its worth. I've found that cleaning the ports is tedious and problematic. The best way to reduce recoil (again, only a year of experience here) I've found is in changing my shells. Even with a 12ga, I will only shoot 1oz loads instead of 1 1/8oz. That seems to make a big difference for me. Many skeet shooters will still use their 20ga in 12ga matches because it is easier to shoot (less recoil). Statistically, they do as well if not better in 20ga.

Next up, what is the pad you've got on the stock? Most factory pads aren't really meant for excessive shooting. Getting a new pad installed can make a huge difference as well. Kick-eez and Limbsaver are two brands often recommended.

Oh yeah...one final thought on porting. Three of the top skeet gun brands are Krieghoff, Kolar, and Blaser. None of them use ported barrels...and those are the brands you'll see most national skeet champions using and selling.
Method is offline  
Old June 10, 2013, 12:18 AM   #3
GunXpatriot
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 28, 2011
Location: New York
Posts: 318
That's actually a good tip, about changing loads. I may look into that, if it starts to bother me.

Yeah, I've only got Mossberg's factory pad on. It really is kind of hard and stiff. Even still, it didn't bother me TOO much. If I were to start shooting slugs or 3" magnums for example, I bet that would change pretty quick...

Even with the Marlin XL7's somewhat "spongy" recoil pad, it really is just painful to shoot. Thanks, if anything, I'll at least look for a good pad for that gun. If I find I'm wanting to shoot extended sessions with clays, like 100 rounds, I will undoubtedly get a better pad for the Mossberg 500.

I checked all of those brands, all beautiful. If I get more into this, I'd eventually look into one of them, I bet. I actually find it interesting that none of them come with porting. I met an older man who I'd been shooting with. He actually was using his Beretta DT(something), I forget. Well I beleive he spent like $9000+ out the door with extra barrels included, but I beleive base price was like $8,xxx.

From afar, I didn't notice any porting, even though two others who were shooting O/U's had porting on their shotguns. I also beleive a couple of olympic shooters last summer were using guns in Beretta's... er... "Pigeon" line. Anyway, now that I'm more aware of these things, it appears that none of them come that way, at least in pictures.

It makes me wonder if porting is more oriented for field use, rather than sporting clays, although, if they really do improve follow up shots, it would seem they'd come standard in both...

If they were more for field use, I'd imagine "all-purpose" guns like the M500 All-purpose would come with them, but... I dunno...

Even still, if some of the most high quality shotgun manufacturers around aren't shipping ported barrels, and the pros are still dominating, it obviously can't be too big of a trade-off.
GunXpatriot is offline  
Old June 10, 2013, 01:04 AM   #4
Jim Watson
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 25, 2001
Location: Alabama
Posts: 11,116
There are considerable numbers of Sporting Clays guns with ported barrels.
They do help on recoil but not a whole lot. Not real common, but not unknown in Trap and Skeet guns. The Browning Cynergy Trap O/U has ported barrels, for example.

The main thing to do to reduce recoil is to shoot a gas operated automatic.
Remington, Beretta, and Browning are the most popular.

Me? My main Trap gun is an old Remington 1100; gas operated AND ported with a squishy pad.
Jim Watson is offline  
Old June 10, 2013, 05:57 AM   #5
Virginian-in-LA
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 11, 2012
Location: Evangeline, LA
Posts: 761
Porting is NOT popular on field guns because of the noise factor. No one is shooting around my dog with a ported gun, and all my hunting acquaintances feel the same way. On a range everyone should have hearing protection so it doesn't matter. I don't see where they help recoil or anything else, but some people swear by them - especially the ones who install them or are sponsored by them - so take your pick.
I don't know what kind of shells you were shooting, but any gas semi auto should have had less recoil than a Mossberg 500, which is a pretty stiff recoiling gun.
Virginian-in-LA is offline  
Old June 10, 2013, 06:41 AM   #6
BigD_in_FL
Junior member
 
Join Date: December 20, 2012
Location: The "Gunshine State"
Posts: 1,981
Porting does nothing on a shotgun except cost you more. There isn't enough pressure to be affected by the porting - they DO make it louder for folks on either side of you.

Here are two brochures for trap and skeet with pointers

After you try those, then you have 5-stand and sporting clays to really get you going.........
BigD_in_FL is offline  
Old June 10, 2013, 03:51 PM   #7
GunXpatriot
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 28, 2011
Location: New York
Posts: 318
Virginian, I kind of forgot about that.

Maybe they were heavy loads/magnums. I wonder if, let's say it was 1-1/4 oz. Method claims that he notices the difference between 1oz and 1-1/8.

Remington does say the VersaMax chambers 3 1/2 inch shells, but who the hell is shooting 3 1/2 inch for clays? I mean it seems like people don't even shoot them for turkey that often, let alone for busting a target.

But could the difference be that big in a heavier/hotter load in a semi auto vs a "standard", if not slightly hotter load in a pump? It could very well be that I'm more recoil tolerant now, but it doesn't change that I can't shoot more than 15 rounds .30-06 even with a decent factory recoil pad.

This is why I was thinking the porting was the reason for such reduced recoil, and even that seemed strange.

Jim, you must hardly feel the thing!
GunXpatriot is offline  
Old June 10, 2013, 03:52 PM   #8
GunXpatriot
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 28, 2011
Location: New York
Posts: 318
BigD, thanks for that info!
GunXpatriot is offline  
Old June 10, 2013, 05:14 PM   #9
BigJimP
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 23, 2005
Posts: 11,358
Its my opinion that porting reduces muzzle rise ...making it a little easier to find the target between the 1st and 2nd shot - and does virtually nothing to reduce recoil.

In Trap - where you're probably shooting singles ...it would make very little difference to have a ported barrel ...but in my primary sporting clays and skeet guns, I prefer a gun that is ported(and I'll use that same gun in the field for live birds).

To reduce recoil -- adding about 1 lb in weight will reduce recoil about 20% ...( my primary 12ga shell for any kind of clay targets is a 1oz of 8's at around 1200 fps ) ....and that should soften up the recoil a lot.

As much as this is beating you up ...it doesn't sound like the gun fits you very well ...or you need some coaching ( or both ) on better fundamentals. Search out some of the guys at your local club to give you a hand. Getting beat up ---isn't part of the game / most adult males can easily shoot 200 targets a day with no bruising or discomfort - if the gun fits them correctly and they're mounting it correctly.
BigJimP is offline  
Old June 10, 2013, 05:43 PM   #10
Method
Member
 
Join Date: July 6, 2012
Location: Omaha, NE
Posts: 73
One thing I forgot to mention. When you look at the most expensive Skeet guns (Krieghoff and Kolar are the top), you might see that their stocks and overall construction are a lot heavier. When I tried them out at a specialty store, I was amazed at the weight difference between a specialty skeet gun from them and a sporting gun from Winchester or Browning. I think some of that weight may also reduce felt recoil in those models, which is why they don't have ported barrels.

Has anybody seen porting on a Beretta or Perrazi? Those are the brands which seem to dominate international competition.
Method is offline  
Old June 10, 2013, 06:30 PM   #11
BigD_in_FL
Junior member
 
Join Date: December 20, 2012
Location: The "Gunshine State"
Posts: 1,981
Browning is the ONLY maker who ports barrels - THAT should tell you something; they are also NEVER used by the top shooters in trap, skeet or sporting clays - that also should tell you something.
I'll disagree with my friend Big Jim on this, because IF it did what they say, then you WOULD see it on every maker's target guns. You don't even see it on specialty built pigeon guns who use the heaviest "target" load around - 3-3/4 DE (1300 fps) of 1-1/4 oz shot, and they DO use their second shot every time whether or not they need it.
Perazzi dominates the Olympics and has for about 50 years - even the Germans and Americans use their guns. A gun writer friend of mine asked one of the top folks at Connecicut Shotgun Manufacturing (who makes some of the nicest and most expensive shotguns around) who makes the best target gun, regardless of price - and without hesitation, said "Perazzi". When Olympic Gold is on the line, international success, etc., that is the gun chosen and no one has ported barrels.
There must be a good reason in there somewhere.................

Last edited by BigD_in_FL; June 10, 2013 at 07:21 PM.
BigD_in_FL is offline  
Old June 10, 2013, 06:34 PM   #12
BigJimP
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 23, 2005
Posts: 11,358
oh come on now ...don't call me "Bi" .....and least change it to "Big" ....

big guys have feelings too....even if we shoot Brownings...
BigJimP is offline  
Old June 10, 2013, 07:17 PM   #13
GunXpatriot
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 28, 2011
Location: New York
Posts: 318
You're right, in the last few days, I hear people talking about xxx/200 clays. Now today, my arm is pretty sore, and lifting it causes discomfort. It doesn't feel "bruised" though, it's strange. Like the .30-06 will break blood vessels in my arm, as did that semi, many years ago.

This feels more like I overworked muscle, rather than being bruised, kind of hard to explain. In fact, my cheek feels pretty beat up too... I'm going to need a few days. It's strange that 50 rounds beat me up like this. First off, I think I may look into a box or two 1oz loads to try. I'll go out and compare them to 1 1/8. I doubt the 1/8 oz is going to make a difference, At the same speed, if you're missing with a 1oz, I doubt you'd hit it with the extra 1/8th.

Another thing would be a better recoil pad. It really does seem that I'm not very good at tolerating recoil, as much as I enjoy shooting. Kind of dissapointing. I wonder if Wolf's Law applies here.

The more/heavier recoil you shoot, the less it will affect you. Muay Thai fighters in Thailand kick banana trees until they can break baseball bats with their shins. Shaolin Monks do the same for multiple parts of the body, including their neck, until they can sustain hanging. Sounds pretty crazy actually...

So yeah, I wonder if that would mean anything here. Shall I just go and shoot more often? I bet over time, you can build at least some recoil tolerance.

But right now, I'll definitely look into 1oz loads. By the way, what would ideal shot size be? How about choke?

Yesterday, I was running (as I said) 1-1/8th #7.5 which is apparently 3 DE. I was running the modified choke that was already pre-installed. It seemed to be what most people recommend. If you are using anything from 7.5-9, I would think it's more of a case of "you either hit it or you don't, shot size won't matter". Would that be right? Was the modified choke correct to use?
GunXpatriot is offline  
Old June 10, 2013, 07:21 PM   #14
GunXpatriot
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 28, 2011
Location: New York
Posts: 318
Patterning and practice on a ground target may help too... I found it strange that on some targets, I'd be right on the mark and miss, while sometimes hit. On the other hand, I would be way low on the beads and shatter the clay into 100 pieces... Plenty of work for me to do if I want to become a competent clay shooter. :P

Or even be competent with birds... Which I was going to look into.
GunXpatriot is offline  
Old June 10, 2013, 07:22 PM   #15
BigD_in_FL
Junior member
 
Join Date: December 20, 2012
Location: The "Gunshine State"
Posts: 1,981
Just saw that Jim - changed it. It's my damn ten thumbs trying to use a laptop!
BigD_in_FL is offline  
Old June 10, 2013, 07:32 PM   #16
BigD_in_FL
Junior member
 
Join Date: December 20, 2012
Location: The "Gunshine State"
Posts: 1,981
For practice, I went from 1oz to 7/8 and now to 3/4 oz at 1210 fps - per a chronograph, in a 8.25# O/U Browning (see Jim, I use one as well). For registered competition, I use 1oz factory loads, some of which are running 1300fps. I can REALLY feel that difference, and after 100 shots at sporting targets, I need a break.

If you are getting cheek slap, you have a fit issue and just slapping on a recoil pad will not make that go away - a visit to a good stockfitter will solve that as he will use a "try gun" which has the ability to change LOP, pitch, drop at heel and comb, etc.

For shot size, it is hard to beat #8s for about anything (except rabbit targets at distance). Olympic ammo is limited to 24 grams, which is right about 7/8 oz, and typically runs 1300 fps. Remember that Olympic trap targets are made physically harder as they are traveling about 62 mph versus US trap targets at about 40 mph
BigD_in_FL is offline  
Old June 10, 2013, 08:19 PM   #17
pete2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 15, 2012
Location: Texas
Posts: 814
Porting is a royal pain to use, I won't do it again. I can't tell any difference in recoil. I would suggest an older used Rem. 1100 gun. Recoil is super soft with target loads like lite AA loads and it's bearable with the cheap 1300 fps bargain loads. A used 1100 gun can be had for a reasonable price especially one with a fixed choke. Get an improved cyl. for skeet and a full for trap. My skeet gun is an old field gun that was originally modified choke. I had it reamed out to I.C. for about 20.00. I do have an 870 trap gun, shoots great but it does kick with the promo loads from Academy. Not so bad with target loads.
pete2 is offline  
Old June 10, 2013, 08:19 PM   #18
Method
Member
 
Join Date: July 6, 2012
Location: Omaha, NE
Posts: 73
Some of your initial impressions may also stem from conditioning. Mounting a sporting shotgun 100+ times and carrying it around isn't something our normal exercise routines emphasize. Over time and practice you get used to it. When If I start shooting again in the spring, I'm usually a little sore after my first six boxes. However, within a month I feel perfectly fine.

I only have a 12ga and have to train with it. However, just about everybody I shoot with who has a 20ga or a series of sub-guage tubes trains with a much lighter 20ga or 28ga load. They'll even use it in doubles or the 12ga competition. It's amazing what reducing loads will do for longevity of your shoulder.

FYI: Because I really got into skeet last year I also got into reloading. I find it fun, and it allows me to customize my loads to lighter recoils. Granted, that's usually only cost effective if you're going to shoot a lot though.

If you try out skeet and really get into it, I highly recommend looking at joining and competing with the NSSA. They divide shooters into various levels, so you'll always be competing against similar skill shooters. Plus, I've found my local NSSA community to be exceptionally friendly and welcoming.
Method is offline  
Old June 10, 2013, 08:42 PM   #19
GunXpatriot
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 28, 2011
Location: New York
Posts: 318
~7/8 at 1300fps for Olympics?! Undoubtedly picking up some 1oz and 7/8ths for some testing. I actually have to visit a gunsmith/LGS this weekend. He has a 200 yard rifle range, 50 yard pistol, a trap setup, etc. I might as well grab some ammo from him and see what's what with this thing.

On MidwayUSA, all of the 7/8th loads are 1200fps, and seem to be minimum Dram Equivalent. They are considered low recoil loads, but I can't imagine 100fps faster are much more punishing.

Also, what is the logic in making "value pack" loads slightly hotter than standard target or hunting loads? You'd think they want to save powder or something...

So as I said, the 1oz and even 7/8th oz shouldn't hinder your shooting too much, should it? I mean, if you're shattering a clay with one load, you should be shooting well with a lighter load at same velocity, correct?

Which leads into the question... Is there a such thing as a lucky pellet? What I mean is, can a stray pellet in a heavier load have a better chance of hitting if the shooter is off, compared to a lighter load? If you chip a target, scoring wise, it counts as a hit, correct? If one wants to become a better shooter, should you only consider a shattered, or at least broken target a "good hit"? I doubt those "chips" are going to do much to a bird in the field for example. This especially with something like a pheasant.
GunXpatriot is offline  
Old June 10, 2013, 08:52 PM   #20
BigD_in_FL
Junior member
 
Join Date: December 20, 2012
Location: The "Gunshine State"
Posts: 1,981
Most studies that I have seen tend to support that slower ammo (the 1200 fps stuff) tend to hold its patterns better - especially the central core - than faster loads. Going TOO fast can actually results in a blown pattern that is so large and uneven that there are holes big enough for pheasants, let alone clay targets, to slip through.

The best way to reduce recoil is three fold - the gun must completely FIT, shoot the heaviest gun you can handle, shoot the lightest loads that work well in YOUR gun with the choke you need for your game; that is just pure physics. FELT recoil, aka KICK, can also be eased through the use of a gas gun action, and a good recoil system (there are many)
BigD_in_FL is offline  
Old June 10, 2013, 09:56 PM   #21
Method
Member
 
Join Date: July 6, 2012
Location: Omaha, NE
Posts: 73
BigD: As I understand it, the pattern is a function of both velocity and shot size. Since individual pellets are not spin stabilized, air passing around them can create more ballistic error. Faster speeds increase the effect such that individual pellets have a much greater chance of veering off the intended path. Heavier pellets compensate for this because it takes more force to change their direction.

That's part of the reason that local shooters recommended I use 7.5 shot when shooting trap. Since the distances are typically longer, you want a heavier pellet so that the pattern is better at longer distances. With Skeet, you use a 9 because you want as much dispersion as possible given the very close shots.

(is that correct?)
Method is offline  
Old June 10, 2013, 10:24 PM   #22
GunXpatriot
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 28, 2011
Location: New York
Posts: 318
More good info, BigD. I don't think I've ever learned this much, or gotten this much food for thought from one thread.

Method, I've found a couple NSSA affiliates not too far from where I live. They really do sound good. I like grouping into similar skill level. Sounds nice, I'll look into that.

Also, BigD, you said you test with a Chronograph. Would you know what length barrel these velocities would be coming out of, normally? I know from most of the ammo tests I've watched, that velocities tend to be on the low end when tested with a chronograph. Sometimes with a rifle, it will come close, but handguns generally seem to come lower.

For .22lr as an example, it seems like they test out of something like a 20-22 inch barrel vs 18, so velocities come in low. With shotguns, or more specifically for defensive ammo, you would think they would test with shorter barrels, but they probably don't. Would a 28" give you a good representation of velocity going off the box, or would a 30 or 32 give you "actual" velocity?
GunXpatriot is offline  
Old June 11, 2013, 06:57 AM   #23
BigD_in_FL
Junior member
 
Join Date: December 20, 2012
Location: The "Gunshine State"
Posts: 1,981
Barrel length really doesn't matter like it does with a rifle. My barrels are 32" long with a Briley extended choke - about another 3/4"- the chrono was set 6 feet from the muzzle (per the instructions) and the skyscreens were used. With the slower load, the SD was 5, and the average for 5 shots was 1210 fps. I am using reclaimed shot, so shot size is a mix of everything from 9 to 7.5 and most are not the roundest pellets.

As to pellet size, you'd be surprised how far #8s will break a target. It only takes three pellets to break a standard US target at US speeds. I do not shoot trap or skeet any more, I shoot sporting clays, 5-stand, and FITASC, which is sporting clays on steroids and shots range from 35-about 65 yards, at all angles, heights, curls, dropping, etc.

All are fun, but I like those because the targets are never the same.

In trap and skeet, the difficulty is not hitting the targets -they never change. The difficulty is now not missing any so you can get into the shootoff with about 20 others who also shot a perfect score. Sporting clays, 5-stand, and FITASC are all about trying to hit as many as you can, There have been VERY few perfect scores anywhere. It may seem like a subtle difference, but it really makes the point
BigD_in_FL is offline  
Old June 11, 2013, 11:55 AM   #24
BigJimP
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 23, 2005
Posts: 11,358
1oz of 8's.....is a good all around 12ga load.....for Skeet, Sporting clays and Trap .../ old school was you needed 1 1/8oz of 7.5's for Trap ...and for the most part that's a dead issue - unless you get back beyond the 20 yard line.

Most of us just keep it simple and stay with one 12ga shell.
-----------
In Trap in general ...a longer and heavier gun is an advantage ...because the longer and heavier gun helps on follow-thru. There is less left to right movement on Trap singles ...than there is, in general, on Skeet and Sporting clays...so my preferred Trap gun is a Browning XT Trap, 32" barrels, adj comb, at around 10 lbs.

My all around guns - where I will use one gun for Skeet, Sporting Clays, 5 Stand, and field hunting ..is an O/U with 30" barrels and a gun at around 8 lbs....like a Browning Citori XS Skeet model with an adj comb. For me, that spec on a gun works really well...its quick, nimble, balanced and versatile. I happen to have that gun in a 12ga, a 20ga ....and a 28ga and a .410 ...and I shoot them a lot.

If for some reason my shoulder hurts (rebuilt - and rebuilt bicep) - or my hands hurt ( especially in bad weather ) ....then for an all around gun I'll turn to a semi-auto. The semi-auto I prefer is a Benelli Super Sport model, synthetic stock, comfort tech system built into it, in a 12ga I like the 30" barrel...its a light gun at 7.2 lbs....and easy to shoot, and carry, all day long. But I stick with the same 1oz of 8's as a shell. I have their 20ga version as well...and the longest barrel they have in that gun is a 28"...and its really light at 6.2 lbs or so .../ I really bought it as a training gun for my grandkids and young or new shooters...but I shoot it once in a while.

But all of this varies from shooter to shooter...my buddy still prefers 26" barrel O/U's for Skeet...and for Trap he'll either go to a single break open 32" or a 30" O/U. He likes his skeet gun a little heavier than I do ...his with 26" barrels is at about 9.5 lbs.../ he thinks my 32" XT Trap gun feels like a big ole sewer pipe ...and is heavy and clumsy ....
-----------
So you have to figure out what works for you. I'm in my 60's, and 6'5" and 290 lbs.../ one of my grandkids is 6'5" and 200 lbs.../ so what works for me, may not work for him as well.

Get some help on a proper gun mount .....and whether your current gun fits you or not / take it to the pattern board, with a full choke, and check the point of impact ...to see if it hits where you look ( it may or may not ) ....and then figure the adjustments you need to make in the stock, or the comb - maybe a pad ...etc....so it hits where you look.

Adjust the gun - and leave it alone --- for at least 250 targets...and work on your gun mount and swing fundamentals...not worrying about score so much. Don't be too eager to make all kinds of adjustments after every 25 targets....walk, before you start running !! --- and enjoy the journey !

Set goals ...like an 18 average on Trap singles....( for every 100 targets ) so a 72 out of 100 .../ but no single score below a 15 and no one station with more than 2 misses. So no 5's, 4's, 4's, 2's, 0's .../ that's not ok, even though its a 15. 3's, 3's, 3's, 3's, 3's ....would be better...( then try to get to all 4's, etc.....) and averages of 20, 21, 22, etc out of 100.../ maybe eventually a goal of a 92 with no one score below a 22 out of 100 - and some days when you start to string some 25's together.

It takes time ...and committment...and calmness...and focus....( and money) ....its not a cheap pasttime..

Last edited by BigJimP; June 11, 2013 at 12:00 PM.
BigJimP is offline  
Old June 11, 2013, 10:55 PM   #25
zippy13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 23, 2008
Location: SoCal
Posts: 6,410
Quote:
Has anybody seen porting on a Beretta or Perrazi?
Yep!
I've got both. My old SC3 (light action Perazzi) has factory porting and Tula chokes. Others have non-factory porting. One reason you don't see porting in international competition is because there are prohibitions against it. My MX8 (heavy action Perazzi) is not ported.

I agree with Big Jim, porting isn't so much to reduce recoil but to quicken second target acquisition.
zippy13 is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:00 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.13868 seconds with 9 queries