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Old April 25, 2013, 11:03 AM   #26
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Let's ask Kim Jong Un.
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Old April 25, 2013, 11:29 AM   #27
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I purchased a P95-dc and put a Hogue on it. Love it and it is very accurate in SA. I thought it was ugly when my Brother had it but I will never sell it.
Purchased a SR9 last week and Rugers are built great.
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Old April 25, 2013, 11:31 PM   #28
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Or, how about Achmadinajerk! Every gun owner should have a safe full of Rugers and Smith's. Smith and Wesson Should reintroduce their steel and alloy framed guns. Update them a little, add rails etc... In a world of Tupperware I think they would sell very well.
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Old April 26, 2013, 10:00 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by 6.8
Smith and Wesson Should reintroduce their steel and alloy framed guns.
S&W does sell steel framed 1911s.
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Old April 26, 2013, 10:12 AM   #30
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P95 - DC

Last night I was cleaning my P95 and noticed the rails on the frame were of the same plastic as the frame. My SR9 has SS rails and I am going to assume that is somewhat better? My DA/SA P95 is more accurate in my aiming and hitting the target because of the SA trigger. Has anyone had the plastic rails wear out on their P95's is my main question?
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Old April 26, 2013, 10:34 AM   #31
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Sounds like a good torture-test idea for Sturmgewehr.
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Old April 26, 2013, 10:46 AM   #32
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A co-worker, his military son was killing Konies in Africa (Lawrence Taylor, Lord Resistance Army ) and preferred an all metal handgun. Polymer pistols used to physically hit an uncooperative person, often experienced frame breakage. Son took all metal 1911’s because the 45 ACP round hit hard and the pistol could function after a strong forehand or backhand impact.

As for the nuclear aspect, it would depend on the bomb size. A 100 megaton bomb, the fireball is larger than the atmosphere layer and vents into outer space. I really doubt any polymer pistol would survive that.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencete...-app-that.html
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Old April 26, 2013, 11:03 AM   #33
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The question about it being able to survive a nuke as apocryphal, so we don't need to discuss it at length.

Or even at all.
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Old April 26, 2013, 12:47 PM   #34
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the gun might, not sure about the user.

No one has really tested out how these polymer frame hold out decades down the road. Beating on it and burying it in mud doesn't tell how it holds up to the elements years down the road
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Old April 26, 2013, 12:51 PM   #35
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I would like nothing better for Smith and Wesson to bring back thier all steel autos, especially the 1076. I wonder if they are too recently produced to qualify for the "Classics line"

Also, I wish Ruger would make an all steel P-90 in .45 ACP.

That being said, my P-95 is certainly accurate enough for what I do with it, and if I could find reliable 15 rnd mags, I would have no problems using it a defense piece.
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Old April 26, 2013, 02:41 PM   #36
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I would like nothing better for Smith and Wesson to bring back thier all steel autos, especially the 1076. I wonder if they are too recently produced to qualify for the "Classics line"
Same here, it amazes me with how many great pistols and even revolvers S&W has dropped from their line. It's tough to find any all steel guns today, and even the companies that still make them like Sig for example only put them out in limited quantities.
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Old April 27, 2013, 11:29 PM   #37
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Lumber joe,

The frame of the P95 is made of DuPont Isoplast and is listed as a substitute for structural for steel.

I believe the SR9 is sometype of Nylon and needs some steel reinforcement.

Even steel frames can crack.

I am cofident that if my P95 is damaged in said blast, Ruger would fix it without charge.

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Old April 28, 2013, 11:24 PM   #38
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Proud P95 owner, had some problems with break in, limp wristing issues as others have mentioned, but this was only ever present with underpowered ammunition, run-of-the-mill target stuff, Blazer, Federal, WWB, etc. At about the 750 round point the problems vanished, and in about 4k rounds since then, the only hiccup was a limp wrist by a new shooter. And that was once. Had an inexperienced brother put the entire slide in my barrel wash (basically just CLR) and now it just looks like a really worn out two tone. In about 500 rounds of it, it has never once jammed on good ammo (home defense stuff), many of this shot when it was already filthy from range ammo.

Case-in-point, had a guy at the range talking down on ruger products in general (due to his defective mini 14), so I grabbed the ruger out of my muddy trunk, covered in crap, same bullets have been sitting in it for months and months. Set up a few empty cigarette packs on the berm, about 105ish yards out, and after a 2 shot walk-up, was hitting them, or close enough to tear them up, every time. Granted, this was with Ranger SXT 147gr's, regular 115 or 124 target ammo wouldn't stay nearly that straight. But with good ammo, it is a tack driver. Just need trigger control.

Conclusion: Phenomenal trunk gun.

But a nuclear blast?

Well, it's not a mosin..
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Old April 28, 2013, 11:44 PM   #39
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Ugly, thick as a brick, shoots real well though, surprised me on how easy it was to shoot accurately. The DA trigger was very smooth, SA not so much, but it still shot well.
Other than the DA trigger that sounds a lot like a Hi-Point C9!
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Old April 29, 2013, 12:17 AM   #40
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It might, but you won't, so it's a moot question.
And would the ammo A million years from know archeologist around the world will be using P95s as paper weights
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Old April 29, 2013, 08:39 AM   #41
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"No one has really tested out how these polymer frame hold out decades down the road. Beating on it and burying it in mud doesn't tell how it holds up to the elements years down the road"

We're 30 years into the first Glocks, and 40 to close to 50 years into the VZ-70, and I've never heard any inkling of there being age related polymer failures with any of those, so I think it's really quite the moot point.
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Old April 29, 2013, 03:53 PM   #42
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Can the P95 withstand a Nuclear Blast?

Quote:
Originally Posted by TxFlyFish View Post
the gun might, not sure about the user.

No one has really tested out how these polymer frame hold out decades down the road. Beating on it and burying it in mud doesn't tell how it holds up to the elements years down the road
How long will a "metal" gun hold up if not properly taken care of? We have 50+ years of use and no issues yet. Throw a poly and a blued steel gun on the ground in the Tennessee humidity and weather. Come back in 15 years do you really think the polymer is what is going to give you the most trouble?
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Old May 4, 2013, 04:22 PM   #43
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Very comparable to the P-95, IMO, except that the rails midway and at the rear of the pistol are stainless steel.
My only downside would be this. The steel slide riding on the polymer frame. That and the springs in the magazines being stiff. Gotta loosen them up a few before you can really start counting rounds .

Having a hammer, decocker/safety (ambidextrous), are a plus. Not to mention the thick polymer handle...really tough. and ..Price!
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Old May 4, 2013, 07:20 PM   #44
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Well, the steel slide riding inside of polymer rails has long been proven in Ruger pistols like the P95, P97 and P345 as well as other brands of pistols. In other words, nothing to be concerned about because the polymer is engineered to be plenty strong enough.
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Old May 4, 2013, 07:46 PM   #45
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The poly/fiberglass like material is used in some industrial applications so the rails will hold up just fine. It's thick and gangly, but it is reliable. If they molded a better grip texture into the frame, they'd probably sell a little better, but I think they'll eventually discontinue it like all of the other P-Series. Thinner, lighter handguns with more capacity all over the place means it's just a matter of time.

Take the S&W SD9VE as an example of a lighter, thinner and striker fired gun with better ergos and 1 extra round. It's at the same price point as a P95, sometimes less.
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Old May 4, 2013, 09:15 PM   #46
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Well, the steel slide riding inside of polymer rails has long been proven in Ruger pistols like the P95, P97 and P345 as well as other brands of pistols. In other words, nothing to be concerned about because the polymer is engineered to be plenty strong enough.
That may be.
I do know that Khar had issues and have since switched to steel.
Heres a few pics



Even had a thread on it here @ the firing line.http://thefiringline.com/forums/show....php?p=5298619

I know the Ruger p95 has a beefier rail and maybe Khar had other issues causing it.
Still yet I would much rather having it ride on steel than plastic rails. Smoother and less can go wrong in my opinion.
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Old May 5, 2013, 06:23 PM   #47
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I'm not much of a Kahr fan. I have seen the embedded steel slide rails separate on a P9 my shooting partner had, then sold the new replacement pistol as soon as he got it. There has never been an issue with the Ruger polymer frame, and while one polymer may look like another, each has its own unique chemistry and P95s were tested with 20,000 rounds of Federal 115 gr. +P+ loads before they were introduced. Admittedly, there is nothing particularly challenging about the Federal load as it doesn't warrant a +P+ designation, IMO. I could make a 115 gr. JHP load that would equal its velocity at standard pressure. But since the Federal load did have an excellent street record, I guess Ruger thought it might be more recognizable for their testing purposes.

With the SR9, Ruger made a change to steel rails. The rear rails are embedded in the frame, but the mid rails under the chamber are part of the chamber-block like the XD/XDm. They're very substantial and it's a very strong system. They do continue to use polymer rails and in the SR9, they engage the front of the slide so the SR9 has as much or more engagement between slide and frame than any current polymer frame pistol. It is their best pistol design ever, if not the best product they've ever offered and the price is so low, it belies the design/build quality of the pistol. Triggers are very good and accuracy is outstanding. I already have an SR45 on the way because of my short experience with the SR9.
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Old May 5, 2013, 09:07 PM   #48
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With the SR9, Ruger made a change to steel rails
The SR9 is definitely a step or even two up. Lot better grip too.

When people first bought the P95 they thought they had a lemon because the springs were so tight in the mags. After a few hundred rounds they saw it smooth right out.

I can get one Starting@ $325 and for anyone who wants a safety and a de-cocker, you can't go wrong with a P95.
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Old May 6, 2013, 12:09 AM   #49
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So your saying their is a chance then? So, for let's say, up to a 40 mega-ton blast or less I'd be looking at what, maybe a new slide stop and decocker, then we're good to go ?
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Old May 6, 2013, 08:13 AM   #50
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So your saying their is a chance then? So, for let's say, up to a 40 mega-ton blast or less I'd be looking at what, maybe a new slide stop and decocker,
It was more of a reference question as to it's toughness. It has one of the thickest polymer handles ive seen.

Also
Quote:
I would like nothing better for Smith and Wesson to bring back thier all steel autos, especially the 1076.
Many use to say the same thing when they started using the alloys used in the 5096, 4096 etc.

They were much lighter alloys in the frame , avoided rust and reliable as you could ask for. However the cost of the alloy metal and the high price to machine it left a door open for a competitor to come along and use plastic frames.
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