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Old March 23, 2013, 12:38 PM   #26
cvc944
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The worst thing about gun 'buybacks' is that the government isn't buying them back. They never owned them in the first place. The money they pay is taken from our (taxpayer) pockets. I wasn't aware that the price was up to 100.00 on these programs because I remember when 50.00 was being offered. I would sell it to an individual who would attempt to restore it before the government who intends to destroy it. Still would like to know from the OP about the condition of the rifle.
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Old March 23, 2013, 12:51 PM   #27
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He wasn't joking?

I thought Valleyforge was joking, as the very idea was utterly ridiculous to me. Not a fan of old Winchesters, eh? Well some of us are. I'm guessing that rifle is in better condition than my well used 1942 vintage model 94 and mine works just fine in spite of the long gone finish. My model 1912 Winchester is now 99 years old and still busting clays as good as a brand new 870. These old Winchesters will still be good long after we are gone.
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Old March 23, 2013, 01:11 PM   #28
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Quote:
To the OP, if you are considering the $100 buyback idea, I will give you $125+pay the shipping to my FFL.
-- $150.00 ! ! !
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Old March 23, 2013, 04:04 PM   #29
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This is getting better......

This is getting better all the time! Heck, even if it's just a parts gun.... I need a metal butt-plate for my pre-64.
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Old March 24, 2013, 09:05 AM   #30
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I'd check to see if, before cocking the hammer, the trigger was moving freely. If stuck or the return spring isn't returning it briskly, the rifle action is due for cleaning and lubing.

If the rear stock is loose in the metal, it's dried out a bit from storage in a warm place. I'd remove the large screw behind the hammer with a close-fitting screwdriver. The stock should then slide off.

Rule Number 1: keep the WD-40 away from the internals of any gun! It will gum everything up within a year or so!!!! (If you must use it at all, apply only on outside metal surfaces.)

Okay, if you know how to disassemble and clean the action without buggering screws and pins, go to it, but if not: Get some Gun Scrubber and spray the internal action, hammer pivot, and trigger pivot parts liberally and let it dry. Apply good gun oil or synthetic motor oil to pivot points of hammer, trigger, lifter, etc.

If there's rust on exterior surfaces, use Break-Free CLP on #300 or #400 steel wool and rub gently. Depending on the extent of the rust, it could take time.

If the bore is clean and un-rusted, run a patch through it with Break-Free CLP or bore cleaner and check the patch for rust. IF the bore isn't rough, but just has rust color on the patch, use a bronze bore brush with Break-Free CLP to remove the rust. If its badly pitted, don't ruin it, but take it to a gunsmith or knowledgeable gun nut to check it further. (Pitted, but otherwise rust-free barrels aren't necessarily unsafe or unshootable, just need more cleaning after shooting. Have it checked by a gunsmith before shooting it.)

If the wood finish is very dry, consider sanding and using Tung Oil, or other oil stock finish. Follow directions.

Hope this helps. Everbody has their own methods of cleaning and rust removal and you'll probably hear from them.
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Old March 24, 2013, 09:41 AM   #31
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Gee, the guy came here for help already.
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Old March 24, 2013, 09:09 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by cecILL View Post
Gee, the guy came here for help already.
2nd that. I think he's got it & the mods can probly lock this one up before its totally hijacked


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Old March 24, 2013, 09:19 PM   #33
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I dont think he's coming back .
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Old March 24, 2013, 09:26 PM   #34
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I say give it a basic cleaning, with some Hoppes bore solvent to disolve the (likely) old dried oil, wipe it off, run a solvent patch through the bore and dry it, and go shoot it, with the old ammo. The ammo, if anything adverse, may be a bit weak, but is probably OK. Unless very old, like pre-war, I haven't seen old ammo go for all that much. A few price it high, but they don't seem to sell much of it, unless in brand new condition and certain types of boxes and ammo. I've bought many boxes, even a few pre-war, for less than new ammo.

It's a great old carbine, and should be fine, even if it takes a little TLC.



Quote:
....Any surface protection would have been wicked off by all that stuff and you had this thing in an attic. Forget about it. It's probably long lost to corrosion.

2. Folks are recommending that you take it apart and clean it, oil it, etc. Don't take it apart unless you know, a lot, about how to disassemble and properly reassemble a model 94. It is NOT for beginners. It is very complicated. You can take it to a gunsmith to do the work, but if the outside is rusty, forget about it. Save yourself some time and money and junk it.

Wow! I guess my old 1927 made 94 carbine was junk when I got it and I never knew it. It was used hard on a ranch for likely all the years before I got it in the early 80's, and looked like it had never been cleaned or cared for. It was rough, inside and out, but functioned fine, and shot decently for a pitted, neglected bore (about 3 1/2" @ 100 yds, and was a bit better after getting it recrowned).


I'd bet the 94 in the original post isn't bad, or it would have been mentioned. Give it a shine up, and see how it shoots. If the action has gummy old oil in it, a basic cleaning with Hoppes should loosen it up. I've found they rarely really need to ever be taken apart, though I had no trouble with the first one I got at 14 and couldn't wait to strip down and see how it all worked. Heck, it would be even easier with instructions.


My old neglected 94,

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Last edited by Malamute; March 24, 2013 at 09:34 PM.
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Old March 30, 2013, 11:15 PM   #35
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All guns were made to shoot. Like every other sensible gun owner that is a part of this forum who has a soft spot for a precision machine I say...oil it...clean it...shoot it. And for heavens sake...don't sell it.
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Old April 8, 2013, 11:43 PM   #36
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Valley forge, I think you hit the nail on the head when you said "give the man some useful advice". I would like to see you take your own.
I inherited my grandfather's old Remington 552 speedmaster. I was told it was broken and wouldn't fire. He wasn't of the tinkering sort and the rifle found its way to the back corner of a shed. Not a nice insulated temperature controlled garage. A shed. It had thirty years of dust and rust on it when it was given to me. Six hours worth of disassembly, scrubbing of each individual component of the entire firing mechanism, a good bore scrub, some oil on the stock, and reassembly netted me a fully functional rifle that looks like hell and shoots like heaven.
Sir, your advice is the worst I have seen on this forum to date. A gun buyback for a pre-64 winchester of unknown condition? Seriously?
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Old April 9, 2013, 11:18 AM   #37
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MDD ++++11111 I was so disapointed in that crazy talk I had nothing to say to it! pure insanity!!
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Old April 9, 2013, 01:56 PM   #38
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If the ammo is suspect, get a bullet puller and do your own disposal. Why bother with local police dept? Pull the bullet, reserve the powder for pyro fun.
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Old April 9, 2013, 09:35 PM   #39
valleyforge.1777
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Right on, mdd !
You tell him!

Anyway, your rusted rifle may shoot well but it is worth less than what you can get from a gun buy back.

And, the original poster never came back and never described the condition of his rifle, so you are simply GUESSING when you offer your advice. Keep guessing! That's all you're doing.
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Old April 10, 2013, 07:41 AM   #40
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@ valleyforge His point doesn't reflect monetary value. You can't write a check for sentimental value. You and plenty others may see only dollar signs when looking at old firearms but not everyone. I doubt just by GUESSING its in unsalvageable condition. I've seen a lot of them revived.
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Old April 10, 2013, 08:05 AM   #41
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Quote:
And, the original poster never came back and never described the condition of his rifle, so you are simply GUESSING when you offer your advice. Keep guessing! That's all you're doing
.

What are you doing? Aren't you guessing that the rifle in question is beyond recovery without seeing it yourself. Sounds like you are giving advice sight unseen also. If I had doubts about the rifle I would carry it to a qualified gunsmith for advice. There is no way I would give it away in some buy back program.
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Old April 10, 2013, 08:45 AM   #42
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Good words Lolbell!
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Old April 14, 2013, 10:40 AM   #43
Malamute
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I think my old thrashed carbine is worth more than a buyback would give, by a long shot. I also simply couldn't believe someone suggested disposing of it to a buyback, even IF it wasn't in perfect condition. Parted out would likely bring far more than a buyback even in less then stellar condition. Geez!

The OP didn't say it had problems or was rusty, he asked if it was likely OK from having sat for so long.
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Old April 14, 2013, 11:22 AM   #44
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Malamute

That is a great picture, love the background. I like the looks of a well used Rifle like that. I am sure the OPs Rifle is fine and a good cleaning is all it should need unless He had a leaky Roof. I wouldnt take anything to a Gun Buyback. It would be like slapping our Fore Fathers in the face !
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Old April 14, 2013, 05:06 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mattL46 View Post
@ valleyforge His point doesn't reflect monetary value. You can't write a check for sentimental value. You and plenty others may see only dollar signs when looking at old firearms but not everyone. I doubt just by GUESSING its in unsalvageable condition. I've seen a lot of them revived.
Very true. I have a rifle & pistol that money can't buy!!!! Pistol was my grandfathers & rifle was my dads
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Old April 14, 2013, 10:20 PM   #46
mattL46
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Garycw I have several that money couldn't buy. 5 actually and 2 of them were stolen from me last September. Very painful and still is. On a positive note they caught the guy and are with the local PD. Just waiting for this guy to be served his justice and I was told I wouldn't have a problem getting them back. Not a day goes buy I don't think about them though. And regarding this thread...regardless of how it was aqquired...its a freakin' 94! C'mon now!!
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Old April 14, 2013, 11:58 PM   #47
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Valley forge, you seem like the kind of fool who has no respect for anything except a piece of government issued paper. I also have my grandfather's dog tag and purple heart. I should probably throw those in with the empty cans to be recycled according to your stupid logic. Firearms stand the test of time with even the most basic of care. You take one to a buyback and it gets destroyed. But so what? You got a Benjamin in your hand right? Yeah. What's that get you today? A tank of gas? A night out at the bar? Then it....and the gun....are both gone for good. And you, the fool, are left with two empty hands.
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Old April 15, 2013, 11:47 AM   #48
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30-30

Follow the others advice Cliff
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Old April 20, 2013, 06:42 AM   #49
valleyforge.1777
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1. The original poster never came back to this thread to post anything else.
2. Not a single one of us has any idea about the condition of the rifle.
3. Not a single one of us has seen the rifle.
4. All of you, and I are guessing about the condition of the rifle and therefore can not really give any useful advice.
5. I am amused by those who demonstrate a need to insult me. None of you know me, none of you know my experience, none of you know my values or what kind of person I am, and yet some of you get off on insulting me. You really need to look at yourself in the mirror and ask yourself why you feel better when you insult another person, particularly one you do not even know.
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