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Old March 18, 2013, 05:04 PM   #1
steveNChunter
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Reloading for 6mm remington

I'm new at reloading and I'm looking for some varmint loads for 6mm Remington.

My dad used to reload several years ago for a 6mm Rem 700 VS that he has since handed down to me. He also gave me some ammo sealed in plastic bags that he loaded for it and never got around to shooting. I've been mostly using it as a deer rifle with 100 gr factory loads and it has done quite well, but with my growing selection of deer rifles in my gun safe, I still have a void for a dedicated varmint rifle. A little over 100 rounds of the ammo he gave me is Sierra 60 gr HP over 40.5 grains of H335 w/CCI primers in Winchester brass.

My first question is whats a ballpark velocity that I could expect out of this load? (I dont yet own a chronometer)

Secondly, dad has been out of the reloading scene for about 15 years now, and though this was surely a good varmint load then, I'm wondering what advances in bullet and powder technology have come along since then that I should try with my own loads. Are there some better "up to date" varmint loads for 6mm?
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Old March 18, 2013, 05:17 PM   #2
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H335 is a little fast for the 6 mm Rem, and I don't see any loads at that bullet weight for it in Hodgdon's data. QuickLOAD estimates moderate pressure (about 46,000 psi), less than great case fill (about 78%) and about 3500 fps from a 24" barrel (I don't know your barrel length off the top of my head). Hodgdon's data site would be a good place for you to look at other powders.
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Old March 18, 2013, 05:30 PM   #3
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My 6mm LOVES Varget (dont remember the charge) under a 70 grain Hornady V-max. many a coyote have fallen victim to that load. the group is a 5 shot ragged hole at 100.
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Old March 18, 2013, 08:25 PM   #4
steveNChunter
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From what I've read 60 gr seems too light for a 6mm with its 1:9 twist, but I remember them being dead on when dad and I went prairie dog hunting when I was younger. But I was like 10 so it was all amazing to me then. (I'm 24 now) My dad's health took a downturn around that time and that sadly cut short alot of the hunting and shooting together but as I got older I took more of an interest in getting back into it myself. Anyway...

Would it yield better accuracy to try to develop a load with a little heavier bullet? Maybe 70-75 gr? I want to go as light as possible without sacrificing accuracy. I need to find that "sweet spot"

That Varget/70 gr v-max load sounds interesting
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Old March 18, 2013, 08:56 PM   #5
tjh
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My model 7 Remington 6mm likes the tnt 70gr. hollow points , doesn't shoot the lighter ones as well .
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Old March 18, 2013, 09:05 PM   #6
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When the bullet spins faster than necessary, wobble due to any minor mass asymmetries is increased. Length actually matters more than weight, weight second, and velocity last in the battle for stability. Increasing length increases the rate of twist needed. Increasing weight without increasing length reduces the required twist rate. Increasing velocity reduces the needed twist, though not by a lot. In real life, increases in weight and length usually go together, and because length matters more, the heavier and longer bullet needs faster twist. Keep in mind you will also get more length than weight with solids because they are less dense, so the same twist will be best with a lighter solid than lead core bullet. Also, in changing shape from flat based or round nosed to boattailed or spitzer nose or even longer with a VLD shape, will increase the ideal twist needed for the bullet.

But overall, you are right that a 9" twist is fairly quick. I see from Berger's charts a 9" twist it will stabilize their 95 grain VLD in 6 mm. So you could go to 100 grains in a less aerodynamic shaped lead core bullet pretty easily.
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