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Old March 17, 2013, 11:07 PM   #26
btmj
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When comparing the many 30 cal cartridges, I find it helpful to put it in terms of range.

A 308 at 100 yards is about equal to a 300 win mag at 300 yards. Shooting the same 165 or 180 grain bullet, the velocity and energy of the 308 at 100 yards is pretty much equal to the magnum at 300 yards. So from a "power" standpoint, the 300 win mag is like being 200 yards closer to your target.

Traditionally, hunters in open country liked high velocity cartridges (above 3000 fps) because it maximized the so-called point blank range... that is the range at which no hold-over is required. But a lot of hunters today use a range finder, and click off elevation changes on their scope, in which case cartridges in the 2600 - 2800 fps range, like the 308, will get the job done.
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Old March 18, 2013, 02:50 PM   #27
Moloch
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More velocity or heavier bullets leads to less wind drift which leads to better accuracy. The 210 and 220 grainers in the 300 really make quite a difference.
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Old March 18, 2013, 04:59 PM   #28
Bart B.
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Moloch, I don't agree with more velocity or heavier bullets leads to less wind drift which leads to better accuracy, at least for shoulder-fired rifles.

Accuracy is how close together the bullets fall on target in a group as fired by the shooter.

Wind drift is how far the center of that group is from the aiming point if not corrected for.

Rifle shooters will put a bullet closer to their point of aim with a rifle that's 20% more accurate than has 20% less wind drift. They read the wind and make corrections for that but they cannot make corrections for accuracy when they're getting ready to shoot.

More velocity or heavier bullets leads to increased recoil while the bullet goes down the barrel making the rifle jump more off its aiming point before the bullet exits.

This is why folks quit shooting 30 caliber magnums with 190 to 220 grain bullets in long range matches and are now using 26 caliber bullets with the same BC's in standard cartridges.

If one compares the accuracy attained with Palma rifles shooting 155's from .308 cases to what the 30 caliber magnum benchrest rifles get shooting 200's, they're the same. Both type keep their bullets inside 7 inches at 1000 yards properly tested; that's the accuracy level they have. And either one will once in a great while cluster 5 shots under 2 inches.
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Last edited by Bart B.; March 18, 2013 at 05:13 PM.
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Old March 18, 2013, 06:33 PM   #29
Moloch
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Wind is never consistent so it will open up your groups no matter how well you can read it. Faster bullets are not as long exposed to the wind as slower bullets so a 180 grain .308 will be less accurate than a 180 grain .300WM.

And I have never noticed that harder recoiling rifles are less accurate, thats BS. If hard recoiling rifles would move so much that it negatively affects the bullet while its moving down the barrel we would all have to chop down barrels of your magnums to make them more accurate.
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Old March 18, 2013, 07:26 PM   #30
Bart B.
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Moloch, I didn't say harder recoiling rifles are less accurate. In fact, I said that a light recoiling .308 Palma rifle's just as accurate as a heavy recoiling 30 caliber magnum benchrest rig. I even mentioned the accuracy levels both cartridges and rifles have.

I said those with more recoil are more difficult to shoot accurate off the shoulder. But it usually takes one classified at or near the top of long range high power rifle competition to tell the difference. Most folks will never notice it as they're not capable of shooting well enough to tell.

And chopping down a magnum's barrel will make it kick harder during barrel time, the rifle weighs less.

If the wind's never consistant, then nobody would ever shoot sub 1/2 MOA 20 to 40 shot groups at 600 yards or further. Right?
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Last edited by Bart B.; March 18, 2013 at 08:41 PM.
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