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Old March 10, 2013, 08:54 AM   #51
Art Eatman
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Lucas, you're huntin' boogers. Whatever was done with the hogs had to be done in accordance with Texas laws and regulations. Deer, hogs, whatever: It's reasonably well controlled. Must be, since I've never read of any health problems in the many years that Texas has had game donations to charity.
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Old March 10, 2013, 10:59 AM   #52
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Because they are wild hogs, what kind of parasites do they carry. When any thing gets over populated parasites become prevailant.
Hogs actually carry very little if anything that isn't present in all the other wildlife being consumed by hunters and present in your family pets. There is all the concern about how hogs spread disease, which is as true as people spreading disease, deer, rabbits, squirrels, ducks, geese, bison, moose, elk, goats, cattle, etc.

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That take and awful big cooler to keep it in or a lot of food shelves.
Yep. You know how many hogs and deer come into processors during deer season alone? The place where we do our hogs is large enough to drive a fork lift around inside to handle the volume, but mostly just hand trucks are used.

Problems are limited, as Art noted, because food shelters and such take proper care in the proper preparation of wild game so as to assume that parasites are dealt with appropriately. Parasites (of all types) are in the wild and domestic animal communities regardless of population size. We may consider the hog population to be "overpopulated" because they don't belong and they are doing damage, but they are not necessarily biologically overpopulated yet so as to be suffering from their numbers. They still have plenty of room for expansion. Keep in mind that hogs can live in groups of hundreds in the wild (Old World) without being "overpopulated" in the biological sense.
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Old March 10, 2013, 04:08 PM   #53
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What kind of processing plant do you have that can handle that many hogs that quickly and in a short period of time?
There is actually a processing plant right down the road with huge coolers....

U can always ask The pigman and Ted any questions....They have websites....They ain't shy....hahaaa

As for me and my huntin..my feet are on the ground....
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Old March 10, 2013, 04:36 PM   #54
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And say the processing costs a modest 20 cents a pound. That amounts to $4500.00. Who pays that bill?
It usually ends up being taken care of in one of two ways:
1. The hunter pays a reduced rate for processing - essentially the base 'cost' for the work. Or, one of the various meat donation charities will cover the cost (at a reduced rate, of course).

Or, more commonly-
2. The processor just eats the cost. Many of them simply do the work and donate the packaging materials, because they want to help people when there's plenty of "extra" meat laying around. Others do it because they can claim it as a charitable donation. Some people do it for both reasons.


One of the game and livestock processors near me just had a post on his website in December showing that he handled 135 big game animals, 17 livestock (cows, sheep, pigs, etc), and almost 2,000 birds last year - all part of one of the various types of "Hunters for the Hungry" programs. All together, he "lost" just under $30,000 by donating the time and materials, because he doesn't take shortcuts (like saw-cutting big game) like some other processors do for donated animals.

He maintains one rule about donations:
If there's room in my cooler, bring it in and fill out the paperwork.

He can't stop people from killing animals they have no intention of eating. He can, however, donate a little time and material to make sure that meat gets put to good use.
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Old March 10, 2013, 06:19 PM   #55
Lucas McCain
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Thanks for the explanation FrankenMauser. I'm glad to hear that the animal isn't being wasted, that makes the story a whole lot easier to swallow.
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Old March 10, 2013, 07:51 PM   #56
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This is so "Cool" It reminds me of some "Good Times", (Door Gunner, '66 V.N., but we used M-60's).

I remember reading that the Fed did the same thing to the elk (?) in Yellow Stone (mid 60's), but they used M-1 carbines and just left them laying where they fell.
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Old March 10, 2013, 10:01 PM   #57
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http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLE14A1A182AD82822

Aporkalypse videos in TX....not this particular hunt but will give an idea of how it is done.... This particular hunt will be televised in August....
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Old March 12, 2013, 08:40 AM   #58
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Re: Hogs by helicopter.....

Quote:
Originally Posted by publius View Post
Helicopters are very expensive to buy and operate. I can also guarantee you that their insurance is outrageous engaging in this activity. You will pay for it. I am for eradicating these vermin by any means possible. If you don't agree, you definitely don't own a ranch in Texas. I've always had the fantasy of setting up a claymore next to a corn feeder and sitting in the stand with a video camera
Lol, I have dreamed about getting my hands on a claymore for the exact same purpose
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Old March 12, 2013, 01:12 PM   #59
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It definitely sounds like the helicopter method is effective, even if expensive.

Quote:
As for me and my huntin..my feet are on the ground....
I hear you Keg! I have a problem trusting my life to something that must beat the air into submission to stay airborne. Rotorheads I know describe it as flying a million parts, all trying desperately to get away from each other! Now, if you want to take an AC-130 up for it, I'm all ears! You could even fit a large number of shooters on the ramp of my beloved C-17, but the leads will be huge...

There is a group of retired Army AMU folks in GA called Jager Pro I've followed for a while. They have 3 guides hunting most days during most of the year, at night, using R-25s and thermal scopes, taking out groups of folks for 8 hours of night hunting. They don't have a lot of days open on the calendar, they have become that popular. They are getting nowhere close to 450 in 2 days.

They are, however, perfecting the use of traps in very innovative ways, focusing on catching entire sounders at once. That's the most effective and efficient way I've seen it done without an aircraft!
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Old March 22, 2013, 01:37 AM   #60
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retire

I keep telling the gang, for a retirement gig for me, no party, no gifts, no cheesy dinner with people half your age you do not recognize.

Send me to TX for a helo hunt.
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Old April 2, 2013, 11:06 PM   #61
kep150
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Hogs by helicopter.....

The game wardens in texas do not fine anyone for shooting hogs and leaving them laying in the brush. Much like rats or cockroaches. They are a nuisance animal and wanton waste laws do not apply to them here.
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Old April 5, 2013, 11:32 AM   #62
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I can see where sunaj is coming from, but I think you would have to go to some of the effected areas and talk to the farmers and ranchers to get a good appreciation for why there is a need to eradicate the feral hogs. Killing a couple a year or even a couple a day isn't going to put a dent in the damage they cause. I don't agree at all with letting them go to waste though, with so many hungry people out there its a shame to let them rot.
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Old April 15, 2013, 10:45 AM   #63
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The price of a hunt for the hogs is what gets me,rancher or land owners are complainng the destruction of the crops then turn around file for insurance or federal help on the destroyed crops and then charge of $200 or better per hog and a discount for a 2nd or more. I understand the charge for processing, the room and board and meals for a so many night stay but the per say kill tag charge really when your crying about the deveistation of the land. Charge for room and board and meals and processing you will get more help relieving the probelm. If the hunter is incompeitent and shoots something he shouldn't charge his ass for the replacement of that animal it would bring plus some and make it hurt. you could also charge if it was guided or not.
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Old April 15, 2013, 03:23 PM   #64
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Why does that get you? The landowners have losses and want to recoup what they can. They don't have to like it that the hogs are causing problems, but that doesn't mean they need to let strangers hunt their land.

Quote:
Charge for room and board and meals and processing you will get more help relieving the probelm.
Yes, having to be in compliance with hotel and restaurant laws, inspections, etc. will certainly making landowners' lives much easier.

Quote:
If the hunter is incompeitent and shoots something he shouldn't charge his ass for the replacement of that animal it would bring plus some and make it hurt.
Charging the incompetent hunter's donkey won't likely yield you squat. Who says the hunter can even pay for the damages or is willing to do so without a lawsuit?

You know, Keg and I have talked about this. We seem to be missing out on meeting all these landowners that are complaining so much and charging so much at the same time. Generally speaking, either folks are complaining or they are charging. The ones charging are often making very good money doing so.
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Old April 16, 2013, 11:04 AM   #65
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Drone with a "ZIP" 22lr on it...
I think municipalites pay a few hundred dollars an hour to rent helicopters. Two days for a landowner can't be efficient.
Surprised there aren't people training dogs to hunt the pigs autonomously. Drop them off for a week and come back. I know pigs aren't defenseless, but a pack of dogs should be able to handle them.
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Old April 16, 2013, 07:19 PM   #66
Keg
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Quote:
Drone with a "ZIP" 22lr on it...
I think municipalites pay a few hundred dollars an hour to rent helicopters. Two days for a landowner can't be efficient.
Surprised there aren't people training dogs to hunt the pigs autonomously. Drop them off for a week and come back. I know pigs aren't defenseless, but a pack of dogs should be able to handle them.
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Quote:
The price of a hunt for the hogs is what gets me
We have a lot of pigs....I know of one place across the river..that charges for guided pig hunts....There are 2 places in this county that are HF and charge....The rest of the land is generally leased up to deer hunters....They do most of the pig hunting....There is generally not much land to allow hunters to come in and hunt..free or otherwise....It is generally leased to hunters for the season or year.....

Quote:
If the hunter is incompeitent and shoots something he shouldn't charge his ass for the replacement of that animal it would bring plus some and make it hurt
Like DNS said..U are liable to have to sue....My experience with that is not so good....I would just as soon keep my Angus bull from harm....
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Old April 16, 2013, 11:11 PM   #67
Double Naught Spy
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Quote:
Drone with a "ZIP" 22lr on it...
Illegal...except maybe if you are military or police.

Quote:
Surprised there aren't people training dogs to hunt the pigs autonomously.
Nobody else is surprised. Anyone who knows anything about trained dogs knows that they aren't 100% and require extensive monitoring. Police dogs manage to bite people other than the bad guys including police officers and bystanders. Military dogs have bitten their trainers. Hog dogs are known to bit each other and their handlers on occasion...and you want to have somebody train blood thirsty killing machines and then just release them into the wild, unattended?
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Old April 17, 2013, 12:11 PM   #68
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Quote:
Surprised there aren't people training dogs to hunt the pigs autonomously. Drop them off for a week and come back. I know pigs aren't defenseless, but a pack of dogs should be able to handle them.
Aside from the liability of dropped off performance hunting dogs...

Dogs would be dead from exhaustion or injury long before a week is up...

We run them for a day or a night and bring them home to recuperate...

Brent
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Old April 18, 2013, 04:10 PM   #69
eskinny
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I started helicopter hog shooting this year, we went twice in central Texas just before the leaves came back on the trees. We flew on a good friends place that is approx 10,000 acres, on the initial trip we had Landowner permits for his place and 2 others making up nearly 15,000 acres total. By the time we got ready for the second flight we had 7 more neighbors signed up and a little over 30,000 contiguous acres.
To the point of economic feasibility, on the 10,000 acre farm alone they estimate between 5 and 10 acres lost per night during the planting season, some of which can be replanted and some is just lost depending on how far along the crop is. Then there is the loss of crops throughout the growing season and loss of pasture land throughout the year. After much discussion between a group of lifelong farmers and ranchers it was decided that you could conservatively estimate $5,000.00 in damages per year per 1000 acres in that particular area of the state (among the most dense hog populations in Texas). This year on the primary farm, during corn planting they lost 0 (zero) acres to pigs, and nightly hunting since has been pretty skinny to say the least.
Each trip was approximately $4500.00 for the entire day (6-8 hours flight time) it was a 4 place helicopter so we ran 3 shooters per 30-40 minute trip. We had 12 guys the first trip and killed roughly 200 pigs, the second trip we only had 5 shooters and killed roughly half as many pigs. I paid for one trip (because I brought along customers) and my friend paid for the second trip, the neighboring farmers offered to split the cost both times and are already planning on fall shoots as soon as the trees drop their leaves.
We shot pigs primarily with AR's but also mixed in some AK's, a 6.8 and a .458 SOCOM, as well as a shotgun or 2. Since most of the shooting was in pretty high timber the rifles worked best. I will say that in my opinion this type of control is the best possible hope for getting pig populations down in a given area, but it will still take a concentrated sustained effort over multiple years to do so.
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Old April 19, 2013, 01:53 PM   #70
globemaster3
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Eskinny, considering the cost analysis, overall it is definitely on the plus side, especially if the landowners pick up the tab since its reducing their overall losses. I'm not sure I could personally justify spending $4500 out of my pocket to keep farmer John from losing $5000/1000 acres.

So, did you play Ride of the Valkyries on the run in?
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Old April 19, 2013, 02:42 PM   #71
eskinny
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Yes, (in our heads)I think we all did. You have never heard so many "Apocalypse Now" references quoted in one day. Also for people who do not see the practical application of a slide fire stock, all I can say is you have never used one the right way. Once I got the feel for it, the slide fire was by far and away the most deadly pig killing device, kind of hard on your supply of ammo though. I took 4 customers the first trip, and compared to taking them deer hunting this was cheap. To a man they had what was described by all as "the best time of their lives". Worth every penny.

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Old April 22, 2013, 09:48 AM   #72
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Don't know much about hog hunting but I watched a show on the Sportsman's Channel last night about hunting from helicopters....looks like a blast.

Now one more thing added to my bucket list.....I think it would be a cat's meow and a perfect place to get a little M1 Garand Shooting.

I use to be a range officer for aerial M-60 gunnery when I was in the guard. Machine Guns are one thing, but I think the Garand would be the ticket and most fun.
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Old April 22, 2013, 11:23 AM   #73
Keg
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Kraig...I generally see Ar's 223 & 308 cals...along with shotguns....But I think a Garand would be pretty awesome....
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Old April 22, 2013, 12:04 PM   #74
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The way my grandfather and uncle killed their hogs for butchering was to "stick 'em", meaning they'd just stick them in the juggler and let them bleed out before they did anything else.

The way I figure, using the Garand, when you get on the ground you can "fix bayonets" and get after it.
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