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Old March 3, 2013, 05:33 PM   #26
XD40Colorado
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"Motor works in a car for >10,000 miles". True, but it is continuously pumped through a filter to clean out impurities (read dirt and carbon particles), so they don't abrade the engine parts.

Does your firearm have an oil filter to remove carbon particles? Mine sure doesn't....
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Old March 3, 2013, 06:39 PM   #27
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I'll try some synthetic in my HK just for giggles. How do you say synthetic in German, or is it even possible without spitting all over their face?
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Old March 3, 2013, 09:34 PM   #28
481
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1hogfan83:
How do you say synthetic in German, or is it even possible without spitting all over their face?
Like this- Synthetik
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Old March 4, 2013, 05:30 AM   #29
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Where did the grease go?

For the Garand & M1A shooters whom gease their rifles with hardware store grease, why is it that your rifle comes off the line after firing ~200 rounds with only 50% of the grease remaining? Qnswer: Cast-Off.

Some firearms specific grease hangs-on or clings to the metal parts better than general household Home De-Pot garage door spring grease does. Automobile wheel packing grease is designed to function while encapsolated, right?

I heard somewhere that when the M1 Garands first hit the WW2 Pacific scene that many were have lubrecation issues and jamming despite being well greased. The issue was that salt water would penetrate the grease and now it was steal on steal with lube/grease on top of the steal. Euro troops weren't seeing this because they weren't around salt water. A reformulated, not just garage-shop, grease was the answer. That's how I 'herd' it.
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Old March 4, 2013, 05:42 AM   #30
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What's in the specialty gun oils and greases that makes it repel dirt/grit?

Put a drop of gun oil and a drop of motor oil side by side on some flat surface in your garage. Go back and look at them about a week later and see if there's any difference in the amount of dust collected.

The problem probably isn't the type of lubricant folk are using, but how much they are applying. If you can see it on the surface chances are you've applied too much. Or if you don't get oil spray on your shooting glasses you haven't applied enough. I forget which one it is.
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Old March 4, 2013, 08:51 AM   #31
AH.74
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Quote:
"Motor works in a car for >10,000 miles". True, but it is continuously pumped through a filter to clean out impurities (read dirt and carbon particles), so they don't abrade the engine parts.

Does your firearm have an oil filter to remove carbon particles? Mine sure doesn't....
This doesn't make much sense to me at all. They are very different applications. Motor oil runs through the engine cylinders and picks up byproducts from fuel combustion. That doesn't happen in a gun, where the main function is lubrication for a short period of time. Collection of combusted gun powder is brief, and then the gun is usually cleaned.

Many people run AR's with motor oil and report that it works very well. I am one of those.

Back to the OP; I would only use white lithium grease if it is not going to sit for long periods. I have seen this stuff congeal and harden. In the application we're discussing, that shouldn't be an issue.
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Old March 4, 2013, 03:31 PM   #32
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White Lithium works great in slides. I use grease on everything including my 1911. I use lithium based wheel bearing grease. It works awesome. The key to WL as well as most greases, is a thin coat is all that is required. Usually for me, a drop the size of a BB per rail.

I also use motor oil for gun oil. Its much better than any "gun" labled oil ive used - though the Slip 2K EWL is a great product. Im also currently using a sample of the Slip 2K EWG grease. Its really good as well. Its a thinner consistancy (NGLI grade 0)than WBG (NGLI grade 2). Im not seeing any difference in performance between it and WBG. The SLip 2000 stuff is great but for the price and availability ill stick with automotive products in the future.

If a person wants to purchase the expensive "gun" lubricants, more power to them. Most of the higher end lubes on the market are fine products. But for someone to say auto and industrial lubes are no good for firearms because they dont say "gun" on the lable, thats rediculous.

Also, and Im sorry to say, alot of the popular "gun" lubes out there are just repackaged consumer grade lubes. 3 in 1 is not better than mobil 1 synthetic. Just sayin.....
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Old March 5, 2013, 12:36 AM   #33
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Quote:
Its much better than any "gun" labled oil ive used...
What you generally get from a good gun oil as opposed to a good motor oil is better corrosion protection, and the knowledge that there aren't any additives that shouldn't be used on an item that is to be carried on one's person.
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Old March 5, 2013, 10:45 AM   #34
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^^^^^^ what he said...

Good old Nyoil and Superlube grease, both safe around food.
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Old March 5, 2013, 12:43 PM   #35
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I too try to use lubes more for general applications than specialty branded types. The most significant improvement in lubrication, I believe, is synthetic. From motor vehicles to mechanical watches synthetic lubricants give superior viscosity stability and temperature range.

The general lubrication I use for door locks, pad locks, hinges, most tools, drawer bearings, casters and fans, I also use on firearms

The lubes I try to stay away from are lithium and Remoil. My experience has been hardening of these lubes over a period of years. I’m not crazy about combination cleaner and lube either because it must be some kind of compromise.

WD-40 is a poor lube because it’s a rust preventative or water displacement formula. I use it only as a cleaner to flush parts or assemblies. It’s very poor in applications that involve heat or pressure but it makes for a handy flamethrower with a lighter.

MMO (Marvel Mystery Oil) works fine in the tank of an air compressor to help keep internal tank rust to a minimum. No real surprise considering it was meant to lube the top cylinder of a gas engine. WD-40 will wreck havoc in the tank by changing into a white power that will clog the couplers.

While I find most infomercial products to be poor products, especially in terms of durability and long life, I find Dura-Lube to be excellent. Usually available in automotive. One of my general purpose lubes. Most frequently used it on the bearings of fans. The fan will be good for continuous, 24/7, use for months. The applicator used is a basting syringe (AKA marinade injector).

My general-purpose grease is Mobile 1, red in color. Always use on lock assemblies with the exception of the tumbler area of the lock. Powdered graphite works fine at the tumblers. My pad locks are the re-key-able type making for disassembly possible.

Another grease used is Dow Corning 111, silicone. This is a valve/sealant grease with a very broad temperature range up to 400F and is approved for incidental food contact. Used on water filter related fittings to the seals of water resistant watches.
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Old March 5, 2013, 02:22 PM   #36
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I've been using white lithium and white bicycle grease for years on my 1911's. The benefit is one tube lasts a lifetime, unlike the very small tube of say tetra gun grease etc. I use it sparingly along with CLP. Have not had any problems.
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Old March 5, 2013, 02:44 PM   #37
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I use gun oil in all my cars. I just wish it came in bigger bottles. Luckily it lasts for more than 10,000 miles, it's a pain squirting it in from all those little bottles.
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Old March 5, 2013, 03:03 PM   #38
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have a tub of white lithium grease that I use for my Garands.
Got some of the Militec-1 grease and use that on my 1911's rails. Works great and since using it, have not had any FTF.
Had one or two FTF with that 1911 when I was just using Teflon-based RemOil on the rails...
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Old March 5, 2013, 03:19 PM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by warningshot
I heard somewhere that when the M1 Garands first hit the WW2 Pacific scene that many were have lubrecation issues and jamming despite being well greased. The issue was that salt water would penetrate the grease and now it was steal on steal with lube/grease on top of the steal. Euro troops weren't seeing this because they weren't around salt water. A reformulated, not just garage-shop, grease was the answer. That's how I 'herd' it.
The lube specified for the M1 Garand was (and is) Lubriplate. I first encountered Lubriplate by brand name back in the 1960s when the American Motors factory service manuals specified it by name for certain applications on ... American Motors cars. Lubriplate is the ONLY lubricant product I have ever seen specified for an automotive application by name. Everything else is generally specified either by a manufacturer's spec number or an industry standard spec number (such as DOT-3 or DOT4 for brake fluid, or GL-3 or GL-5 for gear lubricant).
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Old March 5, 2013, 05:00 PM   #40
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sliding parts and springs for both M1 Garand and 45 ACP. Works for me. Just a tiny dab on my finger tip, wipe it on so it looks shiny but not really visible. Don't need more than that.
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Old March 5, 2013, 06:30 PM   #41
45_auto
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Good Grant Cunningham article on gun lubrication:

http://www.grantcunningham.com/lubricants101.html

Quote:
Motor oils: Generally good boundary lubrication (particularly the Havoline formulations), but very poor corrosion resistance and poor resistance to open-air oxidation. In addition, their pour-point additives often contain benzene compounds, which aren't a good thing to have next to your skin on a regular basis! If you must use something from the auto parts store, ATF performs better for firearms use on every count, even if it is a tad more expensive. (ATF is still 1/10 to 1/100th the cost of a specialty "gun oil.”)
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Old March 5, 2013, 06:55 PM   #42
Captains1911
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Quote:
Just me, but why would anyone use products made for cars on your guns when there is sooooooo many far better lubricants made for firearms? Grease used on a carry gun will attract dust, dirt, and grime first, then lubricate. Motor oil is almost just as bad. It likes to pull in dust and lint like a magnet, no matter how thin the layer is.

These lubes might be fine for safes, gun cases, then shooting at the range, back into the case then being put back in the safe. Unless the weapon is cleaned a couple times a day, it is not practical for daily constant carry.

Hang on guys, I gotta put some more CLP in my crankcase
Synthetic motor oil works and is much cheaper, simple.
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Old March 5, 2013, 08:49 PM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aguila Blanca
The lube specified for the M1 Garand was (and is) Lubriplate. I first encountered Lubriplate by brand name back in the 1960s when the American Motors factory service manuals specified it by name for certain applications on ... American Motors cars. Lubriplate is the ONLY lubricant product I have ever seen specified for an automotive application by name.
Yes, but which Lubriplate? Lubriplate is a brand, not a specification. Kind of like saying your car requires Quaker State oil without specifying which one. Lubriplate makes all manner of oils and greases.

I have quite a few of the little GI grease cups that fit in the stock, but typically use the Lubriplate 105 Engine Assembly Grease because I already had it in the garage.
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