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Old February 10, 2013, 11:10 PM   #1
bluestar
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New to reloading? Advice...Insight welcomed!!

I have started ordering in few things at a time.

i have this on way currently!

Lyman 49Th Edition Reloading Handbook

Lee hand Press

500 45 acp nickel casings

45 acp lee carbide dies which hopefully will be shipped on 28 th of feb.


my plan is to start reading handbook while i order more stuff. im currently running fmj Blazer 45 rounds through my kimber for break in. while im reading i gonna pick up new item for set up evry other week. Next purchse i plan on is primers so i can start putting primers in casings while i am reading load values and preparing to find which powder i want to go with. Also gonna order bullet puller, scale, and calipers.

After reading and getting cases primed i gonna order my powder and fmj bullets. should i start out with a lower grain bullet or is it ok to just get the 230 grain fmj bullets? any other things i should look into?

im not looking for a progressive machine...i got the hand press so i can take to work and use on down time as well as home use. im not looking for a fast reloading method..im looking to learn the right way..take my time..and put out couple hundred rounds a week output correctly. Any other ideas to help me on my learning curve?
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Old February 10, 2013, 11:32 PM   #2
j357
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Welcome aboard.

My suggestions would be to read the new guy sticky at http://thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=230171
and then read the Lyman manual before you order or do anything else.
You have a great outlook on how to get started so far.
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Old February 10, 2013, 11:36 PM   #3
AL45
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How are you going to dispense the powder into the cases? You could place all the cases in a loading tray, weigh each charge, and dispense into each case using a funnel. Or you could use the Lee dippers with a funnel. I would also suggest a hand primer. Remember, there is no room for error in reloading, so you don't want any distractions at all. When I reload, I don't want anyone around and no TV or anything else that might break my focus. And once I start, I don't stop until I am completely finished. Stopping and starting at work sounds risky to me depending on your occupation and work schedule.
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Old February 10, 2013, 11:38 PM   #4
AL45
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Order your primers and powder together so you will only have to pay one Hazardous Materials fee.
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Old February 10, 2013, 11:43 PM   #5
Icedragon
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bluestar, welcome to reloadin. order you a Lee reloading manual (Modern Reloading 2nd edition) it is good to have 2-3 reloading handbooks for the reloading data. Here is a great website for lookin up some powders to use.
http://data.hodgdon.com/cartridge_load.asp
You will need a funnel, a powder trickler is nice to have but not a must,and a set of the Lee Breech Lock Quick Change Bushings so you can set up your dies and not have to reset them every time. As for the bullets get what ever weight you can find and want to shoot.
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Old February 11, 2013, 12:09 AM   #6
Sevens
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I had always thought that a hand press was a neat idea for absolutely portable tooling to address a VERY specific job. But I assumed that using one would...suck.

Well, my buddy expressed an interest in handloading and he had himself convinced that a hand press was exactly how he wanted to start, no matter how much I tried to explain that he would tire of it quickly. That's what he bought, and I made a trip to visit him, bring some goodies, and help him get rolling a bit.

So I got to use the hand press... hands-on and see for myself if my preconceived notion would be true. And I was right. Dead right, for dead-sure certain. The hand press sucks. It's almost precisely what I thought it would be. There's nothing about it that I enjoy.

I still see the utility in it, I truly do. If I found myself in some goofy situation where I -HAD- to do it that way, I could do it. But even when I was 18 and moved off to college, I used an o-frame press mounted to a plank of wood on the corner of my bed to work my brass and it was miles better than a hand press.

I'm not really talking about production speed. I'm just talking about the simple mechanics of the work being done. I'd take almost any bench mented press over the Lee Hand Press. Lee even makes a simple C-frame press that is not at all what we'd term "heavy duty" and it even costs less money than the hand press, but I'd much rather work with it.

Please consider a bench-mounted press.

For your bullets, 230gr FMJ is a fine place to start for .45 Auto.

As to the items you've ordered and those you are still planning to order, you'll need some manner of a tool to prime your brass. As to more help or suggestions -- sounds like you have the right attitude for this... just ask more questions here and be as specific as you can.
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Old February 11, 2013, 01:22 AM   #7
bluestar
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I will eventually get a table press for home use.. got to clean spare room out for now.. and i fogt to mention i will not be loading at work.. just thought i could deprime and reprime at work when I wasn't on calls... Would only be powdering and finishing at home... I was gonna order a scale... Bullet tray and funnel for filling rounds... I just want to take it slow and build my kit up slowly.. don't have the funds to go all in at once.. and this way if I decide reloading isn't for me im not out much cash in the long run.. I jist trying to get my feet wet and test the waters at this point...
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Old February 11, 2013, 01:23 AM   #8
bluestar
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Prime my brass... Are u talking about tool to put primers in? I thought that was in the die set?
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Old February 11, 2013, 02:51 AM   #9
chris in va
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I've used the hand press for thousands of rounds. It doesn't suck.

Could be a little more ergonomic though. I have a nice callous on my left middle finger.

The die set doesn't have a priming tool. It's called the Ram Prime and can be bought separately, or comes with the Hand Press Kit. Skip the Auto Prime, truly a terrible device.
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Old February 11, 2013, 03:30 AM   #10
DASHZNT
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluestar View Post
I will eventually get a table press for home use.. got to clean spare room out for now.. and i fogt to mention i will not be loading at work.. just thought i could deprime and reprime at work when I wasn't on calls... Would only be powdering and finishing at home... I was gonna order a scale... Bullet tray and funnel for filling rounds... I just want to take it slow and build my kit up slowly.. don't have the funds to go all in at once.. and this way if I decide reloading isn't for me im not out much cash in the long run.. I jist trying to get my feet wet and test the waters at this point...
Sounds like youre on the right track to me.. youre reading reloading manuals, thats key! Trust me and anyone that reloads for that matter, once you start, you'll never stop doing it. In fact, it becomes an addiction because its as fun as shooting in the first place. I thoroughly enjoy it, unlike you though, I planned on replacing buying any ammo altogether whwn I got my press so I went with a Dillon and never looked back and have made all my ammo for all my caliber guns since then. Just buy as your wallet will allow and enjoy the results.. Good Luck!

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Old February 11, 2013, 10:13 AM   #11
Revolver1
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Reload what you're going to shoot. 230grs are fine to start with. Bullet weight doesn't make a difference.
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Old February 12, 2013, 07:39 PM   #12
Toolman
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Lee Anniversary Kit

I started with this kit ten years ago. Had everything I needed to get started including the manual. Had the challenger press, auto-prime, powder measure, beam scale & funnel, except the dies, brass, primers, powder & bullet components. I got the kit for $89.00 back then & I think it costs $150.00 now, but still cheap compared to purchasing seperately. If I was starting again I'd do the same thing. It taught me discipline.
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Old February 12, 2013, 10:21 PM   #13
j357
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Discipline is a big part of the key at this point. I dont doubt the hand press is a great tool and gave it some thought when I started.

I will suggest you you consider purchasing the LCT kit from Midway or many recommend a pkg by Kempf's shop. $219 and it will make you much happier than the end once you learn the various steps.

I personally would poke my eyes out if I had to reset each die for each step, based on my loading of 100 rounds of each bullet type and caliber setup.

20% of the time you spend with the process is set up and 20% is case prep, IME. I cut my time considerably by having dies mounted in a turret on the LCT.
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Old February 13, 2013, 12:48 PM   #14
kdemers58
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new comer

You have a good out look i have been hand loading for a long time and that is what it takes . i have a few things if you are intrested a primer flipper, a ram prime, powder measure,lee prime all things i no longer use seeing ii have up graded to a lot of equipment mostly progressive stuff that i use. and the other stuff is sitting around , just a little note if you by brass try to stay with brass not nickle ,nickle seems to crack sooner than regular brass.
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Old February 13, 2013, 01:54 PM   #15
maggys drawers
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Check which primer your cases use. In the past, 45 ACP was all large pistol primer, and most still is, but not always these days. You should be able to tell if primers are a different size by looking at a piece of each brand you are using. The last Blazer I shot was large pistol primer, but it's been so long since I bought any ammo I don't have a clue if it is still the same. You might also call who you ordered the 500 nickle cases from, and ask them which primer it takes- that way you would know what you are comparing to.

With primers so dear these days, it would really suck to finally find some in stock and get the wrong ones.

Have fun, 45 ACP is a great round to load. There's tons of load data out there for it.
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