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Old February 8, 2013, 02:43 PM   #1
cptmclark
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Moving up from single stage

I've been using an RCBS Jr press for maybe 40 years. Still works fine. I'm starting up again and think I want a turret press, to streamline operations a bit. I don't know what's good and what isn't. Big price differences.

I'd be grateful for advice on brand to choose, benefits and drawbacks, and any serious capability differences.

Thanks in advance.

PS: I need some die parts and can't find them. Also die sets, to replace the whole chebang, are out of stock everywhere I've looked. Hope I'm just looking in the wrong places.
Ideas?
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Old February 8, 2013, 02:47 PM   #2
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What rounds are you going to load on it? What quantity.
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Old February 8, 2013, 02:49 PM   #3
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How much are you going to budget for the machine?
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Old February 8, 2013, 02:51 PM   #4
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some may need a progressive or turrent. I prefer a single stage. Been reloading about 18 years and shot alot plus have about 400 boxes of ammo put up in about 5 -6 different calibers. Me dont need a progressive! Plus, I love to reload as much as shooting.
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Old February 8, 2013, 03:18 PM   #5
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Wow. Quick replies. Don't have a price in mind yet. I load 45, 357/38, 44, 308, 445, 30-06, 30-30, 30-40 and I probably forgot one. That means I have loaded those and will from time to time. Very little in recent years. How much? Historically it's been R and d plus hunting. Now I'm doing comp a little and want to become expert w handgu s again after many years away. So I'll use maybe 100 rounds per range visit. I get tired of loading after about 50 rounds in an hour and a half. That's starting with dies in the box and components put away. Double that would make the time seem more well spent.

Did I answer then all?
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Old February 8, 2013, 05:45 PM   #6
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Looks like you probably have all the dies, just need a machine. I'd get the Dillon RL 550B.
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Old February 8, 2013, 06:25 PM   #7
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Thanks for asking our advice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cptmclark
Wow. Quick replies. Don't have a price in mind yet. I load 45, 357/38, 44, 308, 445, 30-06, 30-30, 30-40 and I probably forgot one. That means I have loaded those and will from time to time. Very little in recent years. How much? Historically it's been R and d plus hunting. Now I'm doing comp a little and want to become expert w handgu s again after many years away. So I'll use maybe 100 rounds per range visit. I get tired of loading after about 50 rounds in an hour and a half. That's starting with dies in the box and components put away. Double that would make the time seem more well spent.

Did I answer then all?
Not all of them, but enough. Here are my standard questions:

What calibers will you be reloading? (you listed 6)

What quantities will you be reloading for those calibers? (You said 100 rounds per range visit - but how often per year you left out. Count on that doubling when you discover how much fun and how inexpensive reloading is.

How much time will you be willing to devote to those quantities? I infer from your "hour and a half" limit that you will definitely want a press that is capable of continuous/sequential processing instead of batch processing. Auto-indexing Turret of Progressive is indicated.

What is your budget?

Will you be putting your gear away after each session or leave it set up permanently? You imply the answer is "yes" ("Dies in the box and components put away"), but have not committed to that style. Please elaborate.

How much space will you devote permanently to a loading area, if any?

Do you want it to be portable?

What are your shooting goals? Cheap ammo? Ultimate long-range accuracy? Casual plinking, Serious competition - what kind? Cowboy Action Shooting? Strictly hunting? You said hunting and possibly some competition. More specifics is better.


Quote:
Originally Posted by 308Prepper
Looks like you probably have all the dies, just need a machine. I'd get the Dillon RL 550B.
Good choice, especially for the high-volume rifle and handgun rounds and keeping the single stage for the low-volume rifle rounds is really good. Top-notch answer and would be my answer too, if 500 rounds of a single caliber per session is in cptmclark's future and if there is the budget for it.

Second choice, and my first choice from what I discern in the OP, is the Lee Classic Turret. Caliber swaps are instant compared to any progressive's caliber swaps. The press and caliber swap "kits" are half the price of the Dillon 550. Production rate, however is about one-third the Dillon's and Dillon's warranty is second to none.

Lee makes some economical progressive presses, Pro-1000 and the superior Lee Loadmaster. I will let others talk about their details. I had two Pro-1000s, bought used which I traded off after I got my Lee Turret. Never used a Loadmaster. Hornady makes a dandy progressive, but it is more expensive than a Dillon 550 for what you get and only a little faster.

A complete setup based on the Lee Classic Turret for 6 calibers (including dies, powder measures, scale, calipers, eye protection, everything you need except a bench and manuals bought new will cost about $700 (less for the stuff you already have, of course, and if you shop well). Dies will be mounted already in their individual turrets and swapping calibers will take seconds. Throughput cyclical rate has been reported at over 200-250 rounds per hour. Sustained rate (which includes keeping components replenished and boxing the finished product) of 125 per hour is easily achieved.

I posted my story of replacing my single stage and progressive presses in this thread:

http://thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=478883

I hope it might be informative for you.

Lost Sheep

Last edited by Lost Sheep; February 8, 2013 at 06:34 PM.
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Old February 8, 2013, 06:54 PM   #8
Lost Sheep
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Check this thread

This thread might have some useful information for you.

http://thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=515824

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Old February 8, 2013, 06:56 PM   #9
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Hmmm. Very detailed Sheep. Starting at the top:
Historically I've loaded "huntin" style rifle and dickerd with accuracy and accurizing as the main hobby. Single stage plenty good for that. Handgun also searching for top accurach and R and D. I never caught the high cap rapid fire craze and don't think much of the folks who come to the range with ten loaded 15 round mags and empty them as fast as they can pull the trigger and change mags. Bullets flying everywhere, but usually not into the target. Of course those guys are not reloaders. Pistol shooting (I mean real shooting, like quart oil bottles at 200 yards came pretty quick for me 30 years ago, but it's all gone now I it's going to take more shooting to regain and keep the skill. Likewise the service rifle competition takes more ammo, but still only 60 rounds per match or practice session.

My budget is a secret. Not even I know.


Cheap ammo is very important, as well as no worries about finding some to buy. Otherwise, I enjoy all of the persuits you mentioned. No prarie dogs in indiana, so high volume hunting doesn't exist here. Until I become convinced that my processes of QC are not needed, I wouldn't use a progressive for rifle ammo to be used in hunting or competion. It's ok to correct me about that, but I am a charge weigher in my rifle rounds. Love the chargemaster, but still check them with the scale. (Redundant I know, since the chagemaster has an electronic scale) Pistol at 25 yards I'm not convinced I can improve on thrown charges so that's where I would use a faster operation, or practice rifle stuff below max pressures.
No need for portability. I have a little 7x15 shop with a heavy 3x6 bench and plenty of room for storage of components. My press hasn't been taken down for thirty years. Now I have time to reload again, and cleaned my shop from a storage bin into a gun/loading shop again. Loaded several boxes of 50, and one at a time is all the longer I want to sit there. I do each phase seperately, size them all, prime them all, charge them all and visually check for uniformity, etc etc. It creates very good ammo and I enjoy it, but that's enough. If I could do the same thing and get 200 rounds instead of 50, I'd jump on it. I think I have all I need except the press, but sure to need something.
There, I hope that was more thorough. Usually I worry that I write too much in these things.
Thanks,
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Old February 8, 2013, 10:00 PM   #10
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Quote:
There, I hope that was more thorough. Usually I worry that I write too much in these things.
Don't worry about writing too much. When it is useful, as yours is, it is well worth the bandwidth. What you revealed about your loading style and shooting aspirations will allow us to target our advice much better.

Do you have a chronograph? I would suggest one before replacing/upgrading any of your loading gear. Get the kind with the sensors downrange and the readout on the bench. Much easier to use.

If you want to replace your RCBS Jr, with a heavier-duty single stage press, the RCBS RockChucker is good if you are brand-loyal, but I would lean toward the Lee Classic Cast because the spent primer handling is better and the new primer system is easier to load. If you have the budget, the Forster Co-Ax is worth a look (about $200). Then, there is the Redding Big Boss. Lots of leverage.

You already have my thoughts about the Lee Classic Turret, Dillon's SDB and 550 offerings. Just remember, the Square Deal press will require Dillon's proprietary dies. All the other presses mentioned will take standard dies.

Good luck.

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Old February 9, 2013, 10:55 AM   #11
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Yes, I have a chronograph. Two acutally and the best one should be for sale. It's the Ohler 33, likely the most accurate ever. Also have a Chrony on a photo tripod that sets up in seconds. Takes minutes for the Ohler because the screens are farther apart. Farther apart means much more accuracy, and for each thousand fps more or less you have to throw a switch on the unit to make it work. Easy, but at my range people don't want to wait very long while you set up. The Chrony I use now is easy but I know I'm not getting the fine accuracy. If you want or need fine accuracy, the Ohler is taking up space in my garage and could be had (I know, I could put it back in its box and stand the rod on it's end in the corner).

I read Sheep's earlier post and enjoyed it. Everyone's wisdom is greatly appreciated. I think the progressive is just more equipment than I would use. If I was thinking thousands then it's a no brainer. In the olden days when I got my setup (in the 70s) I was unimpressed with Lee products. Very rough looking and feeling and gave the aura of low quality. They have stayed in the industry for another 40 years now so I should give them another look. I have their dies, and they are cheaper than competion, plus the shell holder if you need it.

From what I read and know, I'm guessing a turret press would increase my hourly output significantly without requiring a big learning curve or a lot of extra time to set up. IS THAT RIGHT? If so, I'll probasbly go that way.

It looks like to use the indexing capability I'd need the powder dispenser on top> IS THAT RIGHT? Otherwise I'm not seeing how to charge the case on the turret and make sure I don't fail to charge one. Eager to learn, but harder without a setup to play with.

Thanks for all the input,

Mike

OH yea, I still need some seating plugs for my RCBS presses that nobody seems to have (RCBS has more than 1/2 hour wait for telephone), and two carbide sizing dies for 45 and 357. Can't find those either in stock. Anybody know where such things are kept on the shelf? Thanks again,
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Old February 9, 2013, 12:11 PM   #12
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Unless you have a volume need for a progressive. I would recommend the LEE Classic cast turret press.
Its seems to have the best combination of features/cost of any other offering out there.
I have yet to read any review from any one who has one that was sorry they got it.

I have the LEE Deluxe ( Aluminum) turret press. It works fine now that I have adapted it to my needs. But the term Deluxe does not mean it was their best offering. I should have purchased the Classic cast turret.
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Old February 9, 2013, 05:22 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cptmclark
I read Sheep's earlier post and enjoyed it.
Thank you. My pleasure.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptmclark
In the olden days when I got my setup (in the 70s) I was unimpressed with Lee products. Very rough looking and feeling and gave the aura of low quality. They have stayed in the industry for another 40 years now so I should give them another look. I have their dies, and they are cheaper than competion, plus the shell holder if you need it.
I, too started in the 70s with an RCBS single stage. (a Jr, replaced by a RockChucker when I got the chance a few weeks later)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptmclark
From what I read and know, I'm guessing a turret press would increase my hourly output significantly without requiring a big learning curve or a lot of extra time to set up. IS THAT RIGHT? If so, I'll probasbly go that way.
I can do 50 an hour on a single stage easily, but 125-150 an hour on my Turret just as easily. Some claim 250 an hour, but I suspect they are not including keeping the components replenished, boxing the product or quality control sampling in their time.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptmclark
It looks like to use the indexing capability I'd need the powder dispenser on top> IS THAT RIGHT?
Lee's Auto-Disk powder measure/dispenser mounts atop the case-mouth belling die (Lee's die is hollow and the powder drops through it) and drops the charge when the case pushes the belling mandrel up. Alternatively, you can do without the dispenser by simply sticking a funnel in the die. If you are not using Lee's dies, you leave the station where powder charging is to be done without a die, substituting a funnel, and drop your measured powder charge by hand. This, of course, means you only have three dies stations available for loading. If you are using a 3-die set this is no problem, but a 4-die set would be problematic.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptmclark
Otherwise I'm not seeing how to charge the case on the turret and make sure I don't fail to charge one. Eager to learn, but harder without a setup to play with.
Take a look at some of the videos on Youtube. Yes, you have to watch the process closely to avoid a double charge or missed charge. This is not difficult if you design your production process and follow the algorithm.

Here's one
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KB6OS0LoRPE

He is running about 20 seconds per but could go faster, I think. If he stopped to double check the powder charge weight once every 25 rounds (45 seconds), refill the powder hopper every 50 rounds (20 seconds) and the primer feeder every 100 rounds 60 seconds), the cyclic rate at 20 seconds per round is 180 per hour and the sustained rate is 160 per hour.

If his operation per round was 15 seconds, the cyclic rate would be 240 per hour and sustained rate 200 rounds per hour.

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Last edited by Lost Sheep; February 9, 2013 at 06:37 PM.
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Old February 9, 2013, 08:39 PM   #14
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Well it sounds like I have some well thought out advice. It sounds from Sheep's last post like to achieve the higher rate ill need to drop charges from a measure. Is that right? I'm a dinosaur and skeptical of dropped charges when precision is the goal. Has that changed? With higher pressure loads especially I'd want to use at least my chargemaster scale. How hard or easy is it to finely set the lee powder measure? Does it come with the press? How about the primer dispenser? I don't want to spring for the whole kit since I have the tools I like.

Another thing is the elevated base. I read that is needed on the bottom in order to put the powder measure on the top. The logic of that escapes me.

Also I don't see if it comes with turrets or dies. Lots of details about thy "kit" but not for just the press.
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Old February 9, 2013, 08:43 PM   #15
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PS

Forgot to ask about four position or three. The comment about measuring and dropping through a funnel being problematic made me ask.
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Old February 9, 2013, 08:50 PM   #16
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if you are just upgrading your press, I don't know why you would buy a kit... the lee classic turret alone is just over $100, if that's all you need, just get that.... all current lee turret presses are 4 hole, they have progessive's that are three hole, but from what I see, they are caliber specific, and based off the smaller deluxe turret press.

you definitely don't seem to need a progressive, I bet you will be happy with the classic turret....
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Old February 9, 2013, 11:53 PM   #17
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Try upgrading to the Lee Pro 1000, it's a economical version of a progressive
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Old February 10, 2013, 03:40 AM   #18
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Quote:
Try upgrading to the Lee Pro 1000, it's a economical version of a progressive
lee pro 1000 is to small for 30-06. Its based off the deluxe turret, and believe me, it wont do a 30-06 without some finagling. I do them on mine, but I have to remove the cartridge from the press to rotate it to the crimp die once the bullet is inserted, which wont really work in a progressive....

In any case, from the sounds of it, he doesn't shoot enough to justify the PITA that is a progressive press.... A lee classic turret is big enough to load all his calibers, plus you have a spot for a 4th die, which can be handy for a separate crimp die, or a powder cop.

On my deluxe turret I can load 50 pistol rounds in 10 min, or 50 rifle rounds in 20, without really hurrying. From sit down to back away from table with a full box can be done easily in 20-30 min regardless of caliber, (if you don't count the few min it takes to dial in the powder charge on the dispenser for rifle rounds.... I really need to pick up a few more perfect powder measures and dedicate one to each rifle caliber....
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Old February 10, 2013, 04:45 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cptmclark
Well it sounds like I have some well thought out advice. It sounds from Sheep's last post like to achieve the higher rate ill need to drop charges from a measure. Is that right?
You achieve considerable time savings even without the powder measure by virtue of the fact that in continuous/sequential processing (as opposed to batch processing) you only insert/remove the cartridge case once. You put it in, load the cartridge from start to finish and remove a finished round, ready to fire.

So, even if you still measure each powder charge, you save some time.

Even if you don't use a powder measure mounted on the press (on the die for automatic dispensing), dropping a charge from a measure off to the side or by dipping with a calibrated dipper, it is faster than batch.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cptmclark
I'm a dinosaur and skeptical of dropped charges when precision is the goal. Has that changed?
Me, too. But still able to evolve. Try this. Drop powder from a powder measure or with a dipper (make one temporarily by taking a found 9mm or .380 case, tightly wrapping a plastic wire tie around it. With a little practice, you will be surprised at how accurately you can mete powder with a dipper.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptmclark
With higher pressure loads especially I'd want to use at least my chargemaster scale. How hard or easy is it to finely set the lee powder measure? Does it come with the press? How about the primer dispenser? I don't want to spring for the whole kit since I have the tools I like.

Another thing is the elevated base. I read that is needed on the bottom in order to put the powder measure on the top. The logic of that escapes me.
My friend has a Chargemaster. Being a dinosaur, I don't trust electronic scales much, but his is pretty reliable. However, it will measure out a charge while you are cycling the Turret press through the other steps, so, if you have one already, good for you. If you find yourself outrunning it, you can decide then whether you want an Auto-Disk or not.

Setting the Lee Perfect Powder Measure is easy and infinitely adjustable, but is not designed to sit atop the Lee flaring and charging die as the Auto-Disk is. The Lee Auto-Disk is not infinitely adjustable unless you have the Adjustable Charge Bar. But the Charge bar is limited in size and not everybody likes it. (Meaning not every powder measures well with it, I think.)

However, if you get some spare disks, you can ream out any cavity that is too small and make it just the right size to drop the amount of powder you want.

If you buy a press alone, it will not come with a powder measure or dies, nor the primer dispenser, but will have one turret and the priming arms (one for large primers and one for small primers). Any Lee Turret kit you get will probably have an Auto-Disk measure and Lee single stage will probably have the Lee Perfect Measure.

Kempf's gun shop is an exception. It comes with dies, primer dispenser and Auto-Disk measure, but not the Lee Scale or a manual. Not including the Lee Scale, I think, is a good thing, as many find it difficult to use despite it being just as accurate as any other scale.

The business about a bottom mount and all that makes no sense to me at all so I can be not help there. I mount my press on a 2x6 with carriage bolts and wing nuts then clamp it into a folding workbench. I keep my press and all gear in three toolboxes when not in use. But that's just me. Other people like to leave their gear set up in a permanent, dedicated location.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptmclark
Also I don't see if it comes with turrets or dies. Lots of details about thy "kit" but not for just the press.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cptmclark
Well it sounds like I have some well thought out advice. It sounds from Sheep's last post like to achieve the higher rate ill need to drop charges from a measure. Is that right? I'm a dinosaur and skeptical of dropped charges when precision is the goal. Has that changed? With higher pressure loads especially I'd want to use at least my chargemaster scale. How hard or easy is it to finely set the lee powder measure? Does it come with the press? How about the primer dispenser? I don't want to spring for the whole kit since I have the tools I like.

Another thing is the elevated base. I read that is needed on the bottom in order to put the powder measure on the top. The logic of that escapes me.

Also I don't see if it comes with turrets or dies. Lots of details about thy "kit" but not for just the press.
Well, you have to read the contents lists closer. The only turret kit I know of that comes with dies is the one from Kempf's. The Lee Pro-1000 progressive kit comes with one set of dies. I think the Loadmaster progressive kit comes with dies also but am not sure.

You mentioned having some gear already. If you make a list of it all, I might be able to put together a shopping list for you to put together a setup similar to what I use. I would need to know what chamberings you need an an idea of the quantities you will be shooting.

The list below closely describes my loading setup and I lack for nothing I want or need. But it fits my style. It may not fit your style. My press mounts in a plank clamped in a folding workbench and resides in a medium sized toolbox when not in use.

I assume you have manuals already, so I left those off the list.
$0 Eye protection. (In know you have them, but novices will be reading this list, so I include the reference.)
$110 Press, Lee Classic Turret (Chosen because Lee makes the only turret presses that auto-advances at the discretion of the operator and the Classic is superior to the Deluxe for several features.)
$40 Dies, carbide. Lee because it includes a shell holder, a plastic dipper for powder and the "powder through" design.
$5 Work surface and hardware to mount. Mount your press on a plank of scrap 2x8 and secure it to a (padded) coffee table.
Dropcloth to catch any spilled powder or lost primers (dead or live). Use an old sheet. Quieter than plastic, less static and drapes better.
$155 Subtotal - plus shipping At this point, you can reload, but are limited in flexibility and speed.
$10 Lee Scoops/Dippers. Cheaper than any powder dispenser/measure and repeatability/cosistency is excellent.
$4 Powder funnel. Lee's funnel fits right in the their "powder through" die.
$169 Subtotal - plus shipping At this point, you are minimally equipped to load well. Not too convenient, but not handicapped to the point of terminal frustration, either.
$25 Lee Safety Prime. You can use your fingers, but this is so much better. Fits on the Lee Press.
$25 Scale, any brand. Lee's, at $25 is cheapest. You can do without, with the full set of Lee Dippers, but better to weigh. For peace of mind if nothing else.
$219 Subtotal - plus shipping At this level of investment, you are decently equipped
$34 Lee Auto-Disk powder dispenser/measure. It mounts atop Lee's "Powder through" die. With this, you may not need the funnel or dippers. The Pro Auto-Disk is better and 18 dollars more.
Loading Bench. A folding workbench works fine for me. You can get a kit or build your own, too.
$253 Subtotal plus shipping Now you are well-equipped as most reloaders, except for convenience accessories or tools you will use only occasionally.

Other stuff:
$20 Bullet puller I never used one for my first 20 years of loading.
$30 Calipers I had none for 30 years. Now that I do, I find uses.
$50 Tumbler Never had one. Got one now. My brass is prettier. Shoots the same.
$25 Powder Trickler - handy if you weigh each powder charge.
$378 Subtotal
$63 Difference to get a more user-friendly scale than the Lee

$50 misc accessories & tools, (e.g. chamfer tool)
$491 Total for a first-rate setup based on a Lee Classic Turret for one chambering
$50 each for Turret and Dies for any extra calibers, $84 each if you want a dedicated powder measure on each set of dies.

If you start with the kit from Kempf's Gun Shop, you will be a few bucks ahead and will not be saddled with an extra scale or manual you may not need since you already have those items.

Lost Sheep

Last edited by Lost Sheep; February 10, 2013 at 04:53 AM.
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Old February 10, 2013, 08:42 AM   #20
cptmclark
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Back in the day I accumulated a lot of stuff, but always had the RCBS Jr press.
RCBS powder measure, RCBS Chargemaster throws into a scale, Lyman balance scale, RCBS case trimmer, Pacific inside/outside deburring tool, dies, funnel, loading block, RCBS trickler, dial caliper, primer arm for the press that never worked, flash hole deburring tool, case lube stuff, kinetic bullet puller (used it several times after finding a test batch of cartridges to be a tad too hot), primer pocket brushes and reamers. Some things I've made, like the slit cases for finding distance to lands, and such.

Probably forgot something. Obviously not all of that is used anymore. I'm fortunate to have a dedicated area for this stuff with a hand made very heavy wooden bench. The room is tiny but I might paint a window on the wall in front of me .

Oh yea, the measure that drops in sequence: not infinitely adjustable? How to I get my desired charge? With low density loading a couple of tenths makes a substantial difference.

I hate handling primers and if the primer dispenser really works on this one I would have it for sure. It sounds like I need to buy those seperately.

If the

I find that I need to clean the primer pockets for seating consistency, and to avoid the occasional high/flush primer. I don't suppose there is any way to do that other than the batch system. What say ye?

Regarding the measures, I think I understand that the perfect powder measure is equivilent to my RCBS table mount measure, but the "auto disc" is the name of the measure that drops charges automatically? Is that right?

I have an almost religious procedure of looking into a block full of charged cases to confirm that they are all evenly filled. For moderate pressure loading I might tear myself away from that, but for high pressure stuff you would need to convince me that dropped charges are equally safe and consistant. (I remember shooting next to BR guys who loaded at the shooting bench, and they always dropped charges and shot sub 1/4 moa. Go figure. I've always used 0.2 gr error as a maximum tolerance. I wonder how consistent my favorite factory ammo is loaded. I'm pretty sure they don't loving lean over their loading blocks and trickel out that last kernel by hand.

I say these things as if I was a current loader, but as I said I'm just starting up again, and not too cocky about knowing everything like I used to be.
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Old February 10, 2013, 10:52 AM   #21
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Location: Owego, NY
Posts: 1,298
I'm on the Lee Classic Turret band wagon. One thing folks overlook is the ability to use the Lee Funnel with the Lee Powder Through Expander Die and dipper cups. I don't own an auto charging system of any type and I load at a good rate. My dippers are customized to a specific charge/powder and I always know how much went in the case. Simple and error free. The picture is of my 40 S&W set up using the Lee system. I have other Powder Through Expander Dies for rifle cartridges too.

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Old February 28, 2013, 12:30 AM   #22
A pause for the COZ
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Join Date: October 11, 2012
Location: Braham, Minnesota
Posts: 351
I have found a couple ways to skin that cat.
Unique was my Nemesis, 6 gr is my 357 plinking load. So I load lots of it.
PPM and the Auto Disk pro were very troublesome with that powder.
( I have since gottem the PPM to drop Unique well)
RCBS Unoflow drops Unique very well.

Solution and still make time.

Mount the UniFlow above the press.

I have since found a adapter to attach it to the powder through die. But Rube would be pleased.



You can also just attach the PPM to the powder thru die.

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Old February 28, 2013, 07:32 AM   #23
jrdavidson
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Join Date: June 29, 2011
Posts: 17
Here's a great resource to consider

Check out Gavin's Ultimate Reloader site here for a wide range of informational videos on various setups:

http://ultimatereloader.com/

After watching his videos I graduated from my single-stage (actually a Redding T7 turret) to the Hornady Progressive AP press for pistol cartridges where a powder drop accuracy of +-.1 gr was tolerable. I relegated the turret for rifle cartridges where tighter powder load precision is required and I can still weigh each charge.

Even so, I spot checked 50 Hornady powder drop loads recently (.45 ACP) and found no discernable variance using my digital scale.

Your mileage may vary...
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Old February 28, 2013, 08:30 AM   #24
cptmclark
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Join Date: November 22, 2004
Posts: 376
Thanks men, for all the good information and advice.

My shiny new Lee turret press showed up last week and I ordered seperately two more turetts. None of my pistol dies are Lee drop through, so I'll have to figure a way to do that part without batch loading. Learning is fun up to a point, and I'm eager to get started. I might even have the incentive to better clean and organize my little loading and smithing shop i'll check out the videos.
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Old April 19, 2013, 07:22 PM   #25
cptmclark
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Join Date: November 22, 2004
Posts: 376
HELP! Finally, setting up the new press and...

Well the press I claimed I had was not the right one, so I now finally have the Lee Classic Turret Press. I'm having a time imagining what they should have made clear in 1,2,3 type instructions but think I'm getting closer.
Problem now is that it's not indexed properly. An instruction says in that case, just put a 1/4 wrench on the indexing rod and rotate the turret into proper postion.

Problem is even though I'm a big healthy guy I don't have enough strenth to move it that 1/8th or so inches that it needs in order to line up properly. I see (they didn't tell me) that here is a ball detent that should assure proper index. If I'm right about that, this thing is substantially off and I can't move it with any reasonable force that won't break something. I could be wrong, but it looks like that little square key thingy has been peened, and then cemented onto the index rod. Does this make sense?

I could maybe get a better wrench with a long handle and a pipe wrench on the turret, but that seems wreckless. I hope one of you gurus who directed me to this device has had a similar experience and can shed some light on this dismal situation. Dismal only cause I'm enthusiastic to get started. No real hurry I guess, I've waited months already.

Seperately, I see some of the parts are plastic and the turrets themselves are coarse castings. Do they work just fine anyway? For a long time maybe?

Thanks to all who led me to this device, and I hope there is enough interest remaining to get me up to speed and loading happily away on my new Lee press. I know it's been a while.

Mike
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