The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Hide > The Art of the Rifle: Semi-automatics

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old February 2, 2013, 03:46 PM   #1
FoghornLeghorn
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 2, 2011
Posts: 537
Ammo for the M1A Standard?

I bought a M1A Standard last year and haven't gotten around to firing it, but I'm curious about the ammo.

I read somewhere to not use soft point ammo (exposed lead) as it could foul the feed ramp.

I've got jacketed hollow point (Winchester 308 150 grain) and nylon tipped (Barnes Vortex 308 150 grain).

On the M14 forum someone posted to not use any but military ammo unless you have the headspace checked.

Opinions?

thanx
__________________
"I say, boy, I say, you're doing a lot of choppin', but no chips are flyin'."
FoghornLeghorn is offline  
Old February 2, 2013, 04:00 PM   #2
Dragline45
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 30, 2010
Posts: 2,418
Quote:
On the M14 forum someone posted to not use any but military ammo unless you have the headspace checked.
That's a load of rubbish. The M1A is basically the civilian version of the military M14. It would make no sense for Springfield to design their rifles around military ammunition. I have shot plenty of standard Remington UMC .308 from my buddies M1A, and in fact I plan to get an M1A Scout in the near future.

By the way, check the box your rifle came in, there should be a slip of paper in there from the factory with your exact head space for that rifle.

Last edited by Dragline45; February 2, 2013 at 04:08 PM.
Dragline45 is offline  
Old February 2, 2013, 04:13 PM   #3
geetarman
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 18, 2009
Location: Arizona
Posts: 2,742
I have a loaded M1A and I have shot commercial .308 Federal Match, DAG German surplus, Privi Partizan, South African surplus and my own handloads.

You have a great rifle. . .go out and shoot it. I have not shot anything heavier than 180 gr. and stick mostly with ammo from 145-150 gr.
__________________
Geetarman

Carpe Cerveza
geetarman is offline  
Old February 2, 2013, 04:25 PM   #4
FoghornLeghorn
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 2, 2011
Posts: 537
Quote:
check the box your rifle came in, there should be a slip of paper in there from the factory with your exact head space for that rifle.
All that came with it was one department of the army manual, a pamphlet titled "the mysterious slam fire", a printed page titled, "from the bench", the "limited warranty" card, a blue sheet for responsible firearms ownership that the dealer was apparantly supposed to get me to sign and then keep with the 4473, and finally, SA's manual for the M1A.
__________________
"I say, boy, I say, you're doing a lot of choppin', but no chips are flyin'."
FoghornLeghorn is offline  
Old February 2, 2013, 04:28 PM   #5
FoghornLeghorn
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 2, 2011
Posts: 537
Quote:
I have not shot anything heavier than 180 gr. and stick mostly with ammo from 145-150 gr.
One guy, from the same thread on the M14 forum, actually said the shooter needed to install an adjustable gas plug on his M1A, just like they recommend doing on the Garand (prior to shooting factory ammo in the Garand).
__________________
"I say, boy, I say, you're doing a lot of choppin', but no chips are flyin'."
FoghornLeghorn is offline  
Old February 2, 2013, 04:35 PM   #6
Dragline45
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 30, 2010
Posts: 2,418
Quote:
One guy, from the same thread on the M14 forum, actually said the shooter needed to install an adjustable gas plug on his M1A, just like they recommend doing on the Garand (prior to shooting factory ammo in the Garand).
Your M1A is fine to shoot factory ammunition.
Dragline45 is offline  
Old February 2, 2013, 09:09 PM   #7
misterE
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 3, 2009
Location: Benton, Arkansas
Posts: 186
I've shot many different commercial and surplus ammos through the M1a. I've just not gone above 175 grain bullets and have stayed away from the "superformance" or any other "magnum" type loads. Fire away! Oh, I've also shot plenty of soft tip hunting ammo out of them too with no I'll effects. Get a good chamber brush.
By the way, mine prefer the federal fusions in 165 grains. Of course to find out how accurate it is, try shooting some federal gold
Medal match 168 grain.
misterE is offline  
Old February 2, 2013, 09:10 PM   #8
misterE
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 3, 2009
Location: Benton, Arkansas
Posts: 186
Ps. Good luck finding ammo of any kind!
misterE is offline  
Old February 2, 2013, 09:42 PM   #9
jonnyc
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 20, 2009
Location: PA
Posts: 820
The warnings and issues concerning ammo-use in M14s and M1As have nothing to do with the on-going myth about a difference between 7.62 and .308, the actual problem is the more sensitive primers that are often used with commercial ammo. Military primers are usually less sensitive and suffer fewer slam-fires in weapons that use inertial firing-pins than civilian/commercial primers. Not a big problem, but obviously something that Springfield was concerned about.
__________________
2014 PA Cartridge Collector Show!!!
Buy...Sell...Trade All Types of Ammunition & Ordnance
Details: http://thefiringline.com/forums/show...16#post5849316
jonnyc is offline  
Old February 2, 2013, 09:45 PM   #10
Jo6pak
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 5, 2010
Location: West Coast...of WI
Posts: 1,462
Quote:
You have a great rifle. . .go out and shoot it. I have not shot anything heavier than 180 gr. and stick mostly with ammo from 145-150 gr.
^^^what he said
__________________
NRA Life Member, SAF contributor.
Jo6pak is offline  
Old February 2, 2013, 10:22 PM   #11
kraigwy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 16, 2008
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 9,409
I never heard so much crap about the M14/M1A that I've found on the internet.

I've been shooting them since 1966, got my M1A in '77 and been shooting it every since. Ran and Coached the Alaska National Guard for better then 10 years using M14s, shot competition with it for about 35 years.

Went to sniper school and taught sniper schools with the M21 (NM M14).

You can believe what you want, you can do what you want but I'll tell you what I've found out about the M14/M1A in the last 47 years.

It don't care whether it shoots 308 or 7.62
It don't care if you use (=/<) 180 grn bullets

It does like Medium burning powder, 4895, 4064 and similar.
It does not like slow burning powder stay away from 4350, 4831, and similar

It DOES NOT need to be shot at super velocities, that doesn't help accuracy, you want to shoot further, adjust your sights, not the powder charge. Keep all loads to below 2600 fps, the closer you can get to 2200 fps and still work the action is the most accurate in a 308/7.62.

Stay away from 168 and less, when shooting past 600 yards. Plenty of good bullets if you want to go to 1000. 155s are nice in bolt guns but you have to push them faster then the gas gun likes.

Even Standard Grade actions do not like to be taken out of the stock, no reason to, there is nothing on the M14/M1A that can't be cleaned and lubed while the action sets in the stock unless you're trying to impress some drill Sgt. THIS INCLUDES THE GAS CYLINDER AND PISTON.

After you shoot a few rounds out of the M14/M1A you'll see some shinny spots where you had metal to metal wear, THATS WHERE THE GREASE GOES.

I know when it comes to loading every gun is different and the loads have to be tailored to individual rifle. That's true, but if you have 24 M14s your loading for its not always possible. If thats the case, load 41.5 grs of 4895 in Winchester or LC Match Brass, Fed Match Primers and 168 or 175 SMKs.

That load works, I've seen more then one cleaned 1000 yard target out of different guns using that load.

NEVER, NEVER, use a jointed or coated cleaning rod on a M14/M1A or any other rifle that has to be cleaned from the muzzle. Use a one piece stainless steel rod and a rod guide. You can make one out of a shotgun hull by punching out the primer and drilling the primer pocket to take the cleaning rod. Just slip the hull over the flash hider.

Leave the flash hider as issued, if you want to, ream it us a #7 reamer. That keeps water drops from interfering with the path of the bullet, but KEEP the ORIGINAL Hider. When using 41-42 grns of 4895 at night, you wont be able to see the muzzle flash.

Stay away from adjustable gas plugs, the rifle doesn't need them.

Sorry for the rant, but I learned about M14/M1A before the internet told me how to shoot and care for them. My 1977 version of the M1A still shoots.

I know I forgot tons of info on this rifle, I'll probably remember them after I hit the sack.
__________________
Kraig Stuart
CPT USAR Ret
USAMU Sniper School Oct '78
Distinguished Rifle Badge 1071
kraigwy is offline  
Old February 3, 2013, 08:17 AM   #12
4EVERM-14
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 12, 2006
Location: Pennsy
Posts: 567
+1 to what kraigwy said.
Except that I have used a coated cleaning rod since I got my rifle in 1981 without adverse effect. Several barrels later and it still likes the 4895 load.
jonnyc's post about primers is important . I have had slamfires as a result of what I later found to be bench rest primers. Primers known to be sensitive should be avoided. The rifle has few quirks. It just shoots.
The rifle is my absolute favorite. Lobing slugs into the X ring at 600 yards is something I hope I never get tired of.
__________________
David
NRA Benefactor Member
Distinguished Rifleman #731
Presidents 100
4EVERM-14 is offline  
Old February 3, 2013, 01:28 PM   #13
Dragline45
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 30, 2010
Posts: 2,418
Thanks for all the info kraigwy. I have taken a real interest in the M14/M1A the past few months and want to pick one up once the frenzy dies down.

Quote:
Even Standard Grade actions do not like to be taken out of the stock, no reason to, there is nothing on the M14/M1A that can't be cleaned and lubed while the action sets in the stock unless you're trying to impress some drill Sgt. THIS INCLUDES THE GAS CYLINDER AND PISTON.
Why is it that much of an issue? When I pick one up I plan on swapping out the Springfield stock for a USGI fiberglass. What are the major issues with the action when being removed from the stock? Also when switching to a new stock would it be a good idea to get the rifle glass bedded?
Dragline45 is offline  
Old February 3, 2013, 06:02 PM   #14
kraigwy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 16, 2008
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 9,409
If you want to replace the stock and or glass bed it, that is fine. You'll just have to shoot it a bit to get it settled in. Once that happens then leave it in the stock.

Just don't expect a lot out of the rifle untill you get it settled.
__________________
Kraig Stuart
CPT USAR Ret
USAMU Sniper School Oct '78
Distinguished Rifle Badge 1071
kraigwy is offline  
Old February 5, 2013, 10:31 AM   #15
Destructo6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 18, 1999
Location: Nogales, AZ USA
Posts: 3,802
kraigwy,

Thanks a lot. I'm a little culo-retentive regarding taking new to me guns apart for, at least, an initial cleaning and inspection.

I have a NM prepared M14 that was glass bedded and, essentially glued into the stock that I was racking my brain how to unglue it in order to clean/inspect/lube it.

I will leave it as is.
__________________
God gave you a soul.
Your parents, a body.
Your country, a rifle.

Keep all of them clean.
Destructo6 is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:14 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.09461 seconds with 9 queries