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Old January 29, 2013, 12:02 AM   #26
oldgunsmith
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I've used WD40 when I get caught out in the rain & anticipate it will be a couple of days before I can get it apart & thoroughly clean it out, WD40 & all. Wouldn't leave it in longer than that. As for screwdrivers, we have always searched pawn shops, garage sales, etc. and bought all the quality name drivers (craftsman, snap on, cornwell, etc.) we could find. Broken, chipped, worn out is no problem. We grind them to fit whatever screw we need to remove/replace. Each one can be reground countless times before it is used up. If it gets too hot on the wheel it will start to turn straw color or blue & should be re-hardened & drawn or the tip may chip or break under heavy torque. May sound like a hassle, but having several around to regrind when you need it sure beats running out & trying to find a new one that fits every time you need one..
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Old January 29, 2013, 08:41 AM   #27
Mike Irwin
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"If it gets too hot on the wheel it will start to turn straw color or blue & should be re-hardened & drawn or the tip may chip or break under heavy torque."

That's why I grind mine on a low RPM water bath stone.
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Old January 29, 2013, 10:16 AM   #28
texagun
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Quote:
Over time, WD-40, if left in the same confined area, will (or at least can) congeal into a semi-solid, hard, waxy substance that is difficult to remove. If this hardened residue finds itself in a place where tolerances are tight for small working parts to move, it can result in a malfunctioning firearm.
Thanks to all who pointed this out. I cringe when I see someone recommending WD-40 to lubricate a gun. As others have pointed out, it's a Water Displacement formulation and works great at that job. My gunsmith, who has been working on guns since the late 50's, said he has repaired more guns that were fouled up with WD-40 than for any other reason. He showed me a trigger group from a Remington 700 that was so fouled up with WD-40 that the parts would not even move. A thorough cleaning with kerosene or Gun Scrubber, followed by a proper lubrication with a good gun oil usually fixed the problem.
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Old January 29, 2013, 02:27 PM   #29
Bill DeShivs
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Regardless of others' experiences, I have used WD 40 on hundreds of guns with great success for 40 years. It's not a great lube, but it displaces water and protects very well. I have not had any instances of gumming. I do use it sparingly, though.
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Old January 29, 2013, 04:27 PM   #30
Tatume
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Bill, I'm with you. After a lifetime of use, it has never let me down. WD40 cleans gummed parts very well, but it does not cause gumming. I wouldn't be without it.
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Old January 29, 2013, 07:47 PM   #31
Mike Irwin
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Like hell it won't gum. Some years ago a friend fell with his surf casting rig, an antique from his grandfather. He flushed it with water then hosed it with a ton of wd40, then forgot about it for a year in the trunk of his car.

When he fished it out again it was frozen totally solid with a nasty varnish.

I had something very similar happen with an old break top revolver.

WD 40 is a light bodied oil. Light bodied oils can decay like that.
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Old January 30, 2013, 04:39 PM   #32
Tatume
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It is more likely that the WD40 dissolved all the old oil and grease that was inside, and then when the WD40 evaporated the old oil gummed up the device. I have never seen any evidence that WD40 by itself would congeal. Having used it for many decades, I have never seen it happen, and don't believe it will.
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Old January 30, 2013, 04:55 PM   #33
dgludwig
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So some of us have had bad experiences with WD-40 and some of us haven't. I can live with that. For those who have never used it, I guess you're on your own. Good luck.
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Old January 30, 2013, 05:24 PM   #34
SIGSHR
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Old Soldier that I am,the First Thing I Do Is Read The Manual. Then I read the Manual. Then I read the Manual. Kuhnhausens are pretty much The Bible,the NRA has published good instructions in several books,as has J.B. Wood.
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Old February 4, 2013, 11:46 PM   #35
oldgunsmith
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We've had more than one video on the S&W revolvers that had a lot of good info. but didn't mention the hand spring. If you remove the hand from the trigger you have to reconnect the spring when you put it back on. It isn't uncommon for guys to believe they've lost it when reassembling the gun (works with the gun pointing down but the cyl. doesn't turn pointing up). The spring is inside the trigger and isn't going to get lost. You just have to hook it back up.
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Old February 4, 2013, 11:59 PM   #36
Dragline45
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Quote:
I have never seen any evidence that WD40 by itself would congeal. Having used it for many decades, I have never seen it happen, and don't believe it will.
Believe it all you want but I have seen WD40 gum up on plenty of occasions. Would never think about using it in any of my guns.
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Old February 5, 2013, 02:53 AM   #37
Bill DeShivs
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I actually tried to make WD 40 gum. Sprayed it in a small container and left it for 6-8 months. It dried a little, but wasn't gummy.
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Old February 5, 2013, 09:23 AM   #38
micromontenegro
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I guess the WD40 thing has a lot to do with climate. For us dwellers of tropical or humid places, it is heaven sent.

I also think it that it has a lot to do with proper usage and knowing its limitations.

Witness the bottom Masterpiece:



I got that gun in 1980, when I was 14. You know what that means: thousands upon thousands of rounds- boys will be boys. Look at that finish: I don't know if the pic conveys it, but it is like new. The only lube it has ever seen in 32 years has been WD40.
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