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Old January 21, 2013, 07:15 PM   #26
whiplash
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Well I got range time today. And knocked the dust off of my Ruger P-90, crap did I ever forget how accurate that thing was! Anyway, had the same misfires today. And had the same results with the P-90. And had one in my friends P-345. So the more I think about it, I may have a really bad box of primers??? Going to town tomorrow, so I will HOPEFULLY find some factory ammo. If all is good with the factory stuff then it might be some bad primers. One thing I noticed today was a lack of primer strike smear/drag marks. I just find it hard that multiple primers would be bad???
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Old January 21, 2013, 07:33 PM   #27
polyphemus
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Could it be that you're setting the primers too deep?maybe you wanna talk to the Reloading Gurus instead.
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Old January 21, 2013, 07:47 PM   #28
polyphemus
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Re: peening

Damage to the rail.I'm looking at it and can't see how that could happen.
Is this the after effect of thousands of rounds?and then this can be prevented with a square bottom stop you say.I will certainly commit this to memory but
quite honestly I remain unconvinced that flat is superior to radiused,there's just
too much evidence of use which otherwise would have caused the profile to revert back to flat.
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Old January 21, 2013, 11:23 PM   #29
whiplash
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I did double check primer depth. All are flush to just around .001 deep. It's the same technique I've been doing for decades and with all calibers. Jury is still out. Just hope the judge finds factory ammo tomorrow.
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Old January 22, 2013, 04:24 AM   #30
1911Tuner
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re:

Quote:
. One thing I noticed today was a lack of primer strike smear/drag marks.
Along with the occasional misfires...among highly trained and keenly observant law enforcement types...this here is what's known as a clue.

Have you checked the headspace?

Headspace is the difference between the length of the case and the distance from the breechface to the case stop shoulder in the chamber. The static dimension only changes with wear or damage. The dynamic...or working headspace...changes with every round fired unless all cases are precisely the same length.

When you have a condition nearing maximum static headspace...determined by gauging and measuring...combined with ammunition loaded into cases that are a little shorter than minimum spec...and I've run into this with some of the Winchester Valu-Pack stuff from Wal-Mart...you can get light strikes...badly flattened primers that are smeared...and firing pin drag marks.

If you don't have access to a gauge set, you can get close with a fired case and a set of ignition feeler gauges. With the slide and barrel off the frame, get a case into the chamber and push the barrel into the slide in the normal in-battery position. Start sliding feeler gauges between the case and the breechface until you find one that'll enter with light drag.

Measure the length of the case and add the thickness of the gauge that fit. That will give you the static headspace dimension. For .45 Auto caliber the range is .898-.920 inch. If you're close to the maximum, and a number of your cases fall below .888 inch...the gun is operating with a condition of excessive headspace with those cases.

If you reload, run the fired cases through the sizer die to get the unfired length...or, visit a friend who reloads and have him run a sampling of your fired cases through.

Although headspace in most guns from a good manufacturer generally runs about mid-spec...once in a while one that barely passes or barely fails the NO-GO test will slip through the cracks.
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Last edited by 1911Tuner; January 22, 2013 at 04:31 AM.
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Old February 4, 2013, 08:20 PM   #31
whiplash
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Well I finally got to shoot. I still had 50rds of reloads left. Still had misfires. This time on each misfire I noticed light primer strikes and then rechambered and fired, separated those misfires brass to measure later. I still had about 1 or 2 per mag. I also ran 20rds of factory, and all fired/functioned normally. The factory brass length was avg of .890. My problem brass was around .880-.885. I do know this is under specs of .888, (was cut too short years ago). I am starting to think this 1911 does not like short brass, and may cause a headspace issue. This brass has always ran fine in my XD. I have marked this batch of brass to run through my other 45s later to see what happens. Most likely I will probably end up tossing them so they don't get used in the 1911 again. Its not going to hurt my brass supply any.
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