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Old January 30, 2013, 01:48 PM   #26
sholling
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Quote:
Originally Posted by madcratebuilder
I don't know anyone that uses a pillar that way.
What way?

Quote:
The pillar is used to isolate the wood from effecting mounting screw tension.
Correct although I still use a torque-driver when tightening the takedown screw.

Quote:
The pillar is also used with bedding at the very rear of the barrel and the rear of the receiver. There is nothing allowed to pivot or wiggle.
You forgot to mention any bedding other than the pillar and your photo didn't show it either and without either receiver and/or 1-2" of barrel bedding (or better yet both) the taketown screw with or without a pillar acts as a pivot (not good) allowing side to side and up and down wiggle. That just needed to be clarified. What I did not want was the OP thinking that free floating and a pillar by themselves with nothing else preventing wiggle was going to improve accuracy.

Quote:
Using pads in place of bedding is a band-aid at best.
Agreed, but it works pretty darn well until he's ready to tackle a permanent solution and also allows him to experiment with location for the barrel bedding. Some do best with the bedding in the first 1" of the barrel and some 22s do better with 1" of barrel bedding near the end of stock.

Quote:
When using a oem stock and barrel band the first thing you do to the band is open it up so it does not contact the barrel.
Been there done that not a fan. Free floating is not a magical incantation for accuracy and while there are sometimes very good reasons for doing it like synthetic stock flex or barrel warp due to uneven heating but neither are common problems with wood stocked 22s unless someone is just rapid firing bricks of ammo. Perhaps you have humidity/stock swelling issues where you're at but thankfully it's usually dryer than a popcorn fart here. Fortunately a laminated or properly sealed solid wood stock isn't effected by humidity. Anyway I'm not saying don't remove any wood but at least 1" of support is usually desirable to prevent movement and I usually remove no more wood than what's necessary to bed. The fun thing about 10/22s is that there are lots of ways to skin the accuracy cat.
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Last edited by sholling; January 30, 2013 at 01:54 PM.
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Old January 30, 2013, 05:54 PM   #27
steveNChunter
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I started working on my stock today. I cut the forend off right behind where the barrel band goes. I found the inner peice of an air line fitting that fit perfectly in the takedown screw hole after a little grinding to shorten it, and drilling very slightly (maybe 3/16") into the hole from the inside to widen the top of it out so that the top of the fitting would sit flush with the inside the stock while making contact with the insert on the other side of the hole. This gives me complete metal to metal contact between the takedown screw and the action. I realize thats an unorthodox way of doing it, but for all intents and purposes it seems to be about as good as pillar bedding IMO. I got started sanding the finish down, hopefully I'll have enough time to finish sanding tomorrow. I still need to get the barrel channel cut out a little to float it. As for tightning up what little play there is between the action/stock, brace yourself.... a couple layers of electrical tape around the back and sides of the action. It may or may not work so well but Im going to use this build to see what I can do with common items I have on hand and spending the least $$ possible. Im not expecting it to shoot as well as a complete custom benchrest rifle, but I'll bet she shoots better than before

I should also mention I ordered a tactical solutions v-block and a flatline ops recoil buffer bolt stop pin. Total spent on that was $28.
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Last edited by steveNChunter; January 30, 2013 at 07:15 PM.
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Old January 30, 2013, 06:45 PM   #28
steveNChunter
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I would also like to know what the correct torque spec is for those v-block screws? Im sure someone has tinkered around and figured out a certain torque that is supposed to be the most accurate. I've heard everywhere from 10-30 in./lbs. I would assume the more the better but dont want to over torque it
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Old January 31, 2013, 10:25 AM   #29
DAVID NANCARROW
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Not quite sure what the official torque spec is for the barrel screws, but since the bolts are going into aluminum, its not likely to be a whole lot of twist. I torqued mine to 12 inch pounds after cleaning out the holes and oiling the bolt threads. Seems to work okay for my particular application.

Bedding a 10/22 is a bit unique as there is only one tie down point for the action, and the receiver is aluminum rather than steel, which is lighter than the barrel. I have heard of some shooters full length bedding the barrel and free floating the action, mostly those who have installed the heavy target barrels.

I did install the volquartzen kit which pillar beds the action and provides support for the first inch or so of the barrel with great results. Mine is a sporter model without the barrel band and a pretty nice walnut stock instead of what comes with the basic model. I ran it up against my other 10/22 T with the heavy barrel and it will do nearly as well with the ammo it likes.

The kit impressed me enough that I ordered a second kit for my T model and I did see an improvement in accuracy there as well.

My thinking that the bedding material in front of the receiver better anchors the barreled action into the stock by limiting movement in side to side motion.
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