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Old January 22, 2013, 04:09 PM   #51
KBP
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Ruger vs S&W which is better?

Better for what? Better how? This question is very important to me. I have to find out for myself. I have a S&W Model 57 but needed to get a Ruger Redhawk to compair the two. I just bought one. Now I will find out for myself. before I start, I am sure the deer, bear or intruder will not know which one dropped them in their tracks! The rest is just personal preference and thats it!
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Old January 22, 2013, 04:51 PM   #52
Dondor
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Currently I have a Pre model 10, and Pre model 36 Smith, as well as a 686+
Ruger Redhawk .44, and .22 SP101.

All are built like tanks.

All three Smiths have better triggers. Inferior Rugers? Probably not. But the fit and finish are better on the Smiths, as the price tag will show you if you purchase one.
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Old January 22, 2013, 08:58 PM   #53
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OK. So I've learned that a couple of people don't like the term "Hillary Hole".

I'm still stupid to the term. Can anyone explain how it works, what it does? I guess it does not allow firing a revolver (revolver only?). Requires some kind of key or ???


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Old January 23, 2013, 12:00 AM   #54
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I'm still stupid to the term. Can anyone explain how it works, what it does? I guess it does not allow firing a revolver (revolver only?). Requires some kind of key or ???
New S&W revolvers come with a small key (some people describe it as a "skate key" because that is what it resembles though many younger people may have never seen nor heard of a skate key) that, when inserted through the hole in the left side of the frame and turned, engage an internal locking mechanism that blocks the movement of the hammer and thus locks the action of the revolver. With the lock engaged, the cylinder can still be opened to load and unload the revolver, but the trigger cannot be pulled, the hammer cannot be cocked, and the revolver cannot be fired. A description of the device can be found on pages 15-17 of S&W's current revolver owner's manual.

http://www.smith-wesson.com/wcsstore...01-30-2011.pdf
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Old January 23, 2013, 06:04 AM   #55
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That is a gorgeous wheel gun! I like the looks of the Ruger Service/Security Sixes, but wow, that one is a stunner.
Sorry, I should have addressed this earlier. I like the Ruger Speed/Security Sixs also. Back when you could still walk into a gun store and buy a brand new one in the yellow cardboard box, I owned several of them. Not because I thought they were "better" than a Smith & Wesson, but because they were less expensive. I don't think I gave up anything to a Smith & Wesson back then. I don't think you would today either. The only thing wrong with them is, Ruger worked hard to made a worse standard grip than the Smith & Wesson Magna. They succeeded. Thank goodness for Pachmyer.
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Old January 24, 2013, 04:36 PM   #56
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For functionality, either is great, although in some cases Rugers may take a bit more extreme abuse (not enough difference to matter to most). Rugers absolutely have me won over with the Blackhawk series for vintage style and durability, especially if you want .45 Colt.

In terms of sex appeal and future resale value for most models, I have no doubt S&W wins hands down. You'll never see a mainline production Ruger having the kind of cache that old Smiths have. But since Rugers have less resale value, you end up getting lots of bang for the buck.
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Old January 24, 2013, 04:42 PM   #57
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S&W trumps Ruger in every catagory they mutually serve with the exception of that crumby little S&W 22a.

Rugers are over priced for investment cast in my opinion.
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Old January 24, 2013, 07:21 PM   #58
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The SP101 is definitely easier for me to hold onto & shoot heavier loads than the S&W J frame.
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Old January 24, 2013, 07:25 PM   #59
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Which customer service is better? To me that means a lot. Never sent one back so far so I don't know.
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Old January 24, 2013, 09:24 PM   #60
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Cruder vs S&W? Is this a trick question?

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Old January 24, 2013, 09:30 PM   #61
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It makes no difference. Shoot the one that feels best in your hands. Both companies do the best they can to make good pistols and both companies are good at it.

I like'em both.
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Old January 24, 2013, 09:39 PM   #62
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Originally Posted by stevej View Post
Which customer service is better? To me that means a lot. Never sent one back so far so I don't know.
They both have outstanding reputations for customer service.
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Old January 24, 2013, 09:48 PM   #63
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the best advice was from stepmac

They're both great.

Pick the one you like. I've shot'em both,,, alot.

Get one,, but 2,000 rounds through it.

all good.
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Old January 24, 2013, 11:15 PM   #64
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Revolver fans usually have both. The older Smiths were a little more refined, mainly because their actions required hand fitting. Rugers with their solid frames are theoretically stronger--but what'll blow up either one will blow up the other. A competitive shooter or commercial range owner who rents out both brands may find that Ruger revolvers will take more abuse or use before repair is needed. A steady diet of full house magnum loads in .357, .41, or
.44 magnum will cause either brand to wear rapidly.

So, in the long run, which will last longer? Doesn't matter because in the long run we'll all be dead.
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Old January 25, 2013, 10:24 AM   #65
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Both are great revolvers. Smiths often get the nod for out-of-the-box fit, finish and trigger, though Rugers tune up very nicely. Rugers are renowned for their durability, but Smiths are plenty durable, too. The bigger difference, IMO, are design differences:

1. Newer S&Ws use a single screw/plunger assembly to hold the cylinder/crane in, which is one of their weak links - with enough hard use & reloading, it can bend. Bend enough, and the cylinder won't shut, or will even fall out of the gun. I've seen both happen (though to be fair, it's been on competition guns that see lots of very hard use). The GP100 doesn't use such a system, and it's impossible to even removed the cylinder/crane assembly until the trigger assembly's been removed.

2. Another S&W weak link is their ejector rod: It not only turns as the cylinder turns, but it's also used to lock the front of the cylinder in place. If the rod gets bent a bit, even a little, it can bind against the retaining plunger under the barrel as the action cycles, which will obviously affect the smoothness of the action and the gun's accuracy. The GP100 ejector rod, in contrast, doesn't turn with the cylinder, nor is it used to lock the front of the cylinder. Instead, the front of the cylinder is locked in place by a mechanism that links the crane to the frame, closer to where the actual force is being generated.

Other GP100 niceties include:

3. Front sight: The GP100 (at least the adjustable sight version) comes with an interchangeable front sight. Some S&Ws come with interchangeable sights, but most don't. Though they can be converted, it'd take some milling by a gunsmith (read: time & $$) to accept the Weigand base.

4. Reach to the trigger: I'm going by memory, but IIRC, the reach to the trigger seemed shorter on the GP100, so one can use grips with a covered backstrap to reduce recoil, while still having a manageable trigger reach.

So, what are/were the GP100 cons?

1. Ruger won't sell certain parts, so if a piece of unobtainium breaks, you'll have to send the gun to Ruger for repair. and if you send it back to Ruger, they'll send it back in factory configuration. No biggie if your gun is stock, but if you've spent money to tune & modify it, it can be a hassle, I suppose.

2. Historically, the fit and finish of Rugers weren't up to that of S&Ws, and the factory action's typically been rougher. The good news is they respond well to some basic smoothing & tuning. I've shot several tuned GP100s that were as smooth as silk.
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Old January 25, 2013, 08:16 PM   #66
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Front sight: The GP100 (at least the adjustable sight version) comes with an interchangeable front sight. Some S&Ws come with interchangeable sights, but most don't. Though they can be converted, it'd take some milling by a gunsmith (read: time & $$) to accept the Weigand base.
While this is true of the 4" and 6" barrel models, it bears mentioning that the 3" GP100 does not have the interchangeable front sight.
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Old January 26, 2013, 01:26 AM   #67
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OK, I'm stupid to the term. What's a "Hillary Hole"?
A place Bill apparently avoids if at all possible.

I have both and would be hard pressed to pick one over the other. I guess if a model 19 and a GP-100 (or one of my security six's) were laying on a table and I had to choose one to carry while crossing the Gobi Desert Or some other out of the way place I would pick the security six or the GP-100. But a good flap holster would make either one OK for the trip.
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Old January 26, 2013, 02:05 AM   #68
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Well only one of them makes both SA and DA so it is really no contest on which is better

I prefer Rugers. Smiths have better triggers and the blueing is better, but I like stainless revolvers. I do not think the finish on the stainless ones are too far apart and I happen to think the six series Rugers are the best looking ones ever made. They "look strong and elegant"

I also like the fact that I can handload to a littler higher levels.

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Which customer service is better? To me that means a lot. Never sent one back so far so I don't know.
The reputation of both of them is great. So good in fact, I wouldn't use it in my determining factor. You will be taken care of with either

Quote:
S&W trumps Ruger in every catagory they mutually serve with the exception of that crumby little S&W 22a.

Rugers are over priced for investment cast in my opinion.
I rather have a stronger, more rebust investment cast than a weaker forged. I put function over outdated inaccurate sterotypes
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Old January 26, 2013, 02:32 AM   #69
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Ruger & Smith

I have one of each in 41 magnum; Love em both !!
Smith is dbl action, Ruger is sngl action
The Smith has a better trigger, the Ruger has a better grip.
Accuracy they are about even, I don't shoot real heavy loads, so recoil is not punishing

215 grn swc @ 900-1000 fps for plinking
215 swc @ 1300 fps for hunting and
210 grn jhp @ 1300 fps also for hunting
Great shooters and lots of fun !
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Old January 26, 2013, 08:00 AM   #70
stevej
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If you buy an old revolver

and send it in which one will take better care of you? have heard a lot of good stories on the net about Ruger CS about old guns. As I say don't know anything myself but wanting a 1/2 lug revolver and found a M&P and a Model 10 used of course and missed a Security Six by about 2 hrs which I really wanted. Being new to handguns so if I bought one with a problem which would give me better CS?

Quote:
Which customer service is better? To me that means a lot. Never sent one back so far so I don't know.
Quote:
The reputation of both of them is great. So good in fact, I wouldn't use it in my determining factor. You will be taken care of with either
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Old January 26, 2013, 10:56 AM   #71
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As far as customer service, I can offer you examples of each. My first experience with S&W customer service was when I bought a used 1076 with a non-functional decocker. I sent it back to S&W and not only did they fix the decocker, but they also put a new set of grips on it free of charge. The second experience was when my 629 broke its firing pin shooting factory ammo. I called S&W, they sent me a prepaid FedEx label, and I had a fully functional revolver back in less than two weeks.

My dad has dealt with Ruger CS on his LCR. He bought the gun new and, when dryfiring, the trigger didn't always want to fully reset (he'd have to push it forward with his finger). He called Ruger and they sent UPS to the house to pick the gun up. Within two weeks, dad had a fully functional LCR back.

So, based on my dad and my experiences, I think that both have excellent CS and that in this particular respect, they're even.
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Old January 26, 2013, 11:24 AM   #72
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This thread is not going anywere. Between S&W and Ruger it come down to personal choice. Both are well made. Both have excellent customer service. I have both. Neither one is the clear cut best in my opinion.
When I started shooting in the late sixties a person had three choices. Colt, S&W and Ruger. The price of the Colts was way too much for my budget. S&W revolvers were great but I decided on a Ruger for my first revolver. Reason, great value for the money. Rugers are a "working mans gun". Its like picking a brand of car. Some people like Chevys and some folks like Fords. This thread has proven there is not a clear winner.
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Old January 26, 2013, 08:54 PM   #73
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This thread is not going anywere.
That's perfectly acceptable to me. I enjoy hearing other people's experiences and opinions on this or that gun related stuff. There obviously isn't any "final answer". Opinions are good.

I recommend obtaining at least a couple of each! ...


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Old January 26, 2013, 09:16 PM   #74
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I'd take a new GP-100 (or Redhawk) over a new S&W L-frame (or N-frame) but I'd take a pre-lock S&W over either. And for the folks who are so adamant on their superior moral high ground... it's not about the lock and it's not about the politics. The lock is simply a dead giveaway-like a neon light saying that it's a much newer MIM-filled revolver that simply doesn't arrive in my hands as as much gun for my money.

I owned one lock revolver and it was okay, but didn't rival any of the ones I've kept. I've seen a very good friend come up with a handful of lock revolvers and each of them is, IMO, inferior in double action trigger execution, every one of them. (the single action seems quite good...but I rarely shoot a DA revolver in single action)

As to the lock itself, it's almost hard to believe that Taurus implemented and executed a BETTER system for the same result than Smith & Wesson could manage. S&W should be embarrassed.

I'll also admit that like MANY folks, I'm nostalgic. Things from my formative years will nearly always hold a special attraction for me. So I love Smith & Wesson revolvers built from the early to late 1980's. They look and feel right to me. Earlier ones are terrific -- and later ones simply don't interest me nearly as much. And S&W revolvers with the ILS? They don't interest me at all.
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Old January 26, 2013, 09:23 PM   #75
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I own one Redhawk (1985) and one GP-100 (2010 or 2011) and I love BOTH of them, but prefer the double action of my K and L-frame S&W's, of which I own more.

The double action on my .44 Mag Redhawk is...interesting. It's got a nice, smooth, predictable DA pull, but requires a stiff tug to break. It seemed a bit odd to me, almost as if it was a bit abnormal or needed work. That is, until I tried a similar vintage .44 Redhawk owned by a friend, and his double action feels almost EXACTLY the same. When I'm used to it, I do fine with it.

The single action is also quite a tug, more than I'd expect from a DA revolver. But then...I grew up on K & L frames and all other double action revolvers feel different/abnormal/not quite as good.
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