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Old January 10, 2013, 06:20 PM   #1
anthonycd1
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.40 cal loading data and primer question

So I just started reloading. I did some research and loaded up 150 rounds. But after finding this awesome forum and reading post I have begin to doubt the load that I put together. I used federal small magnum pistol primers since that's all I could find. Berry 155 grain . 401 round shoulder plated bullets. 6 grains of alliant bullseye powder. Hard crimp. OAL is 1.126. I used 6 grains because that's what alliants web site said for 155 gr Speer GDHP I figure that would work. Are magnum primers to hot for this powder. Is a 6 gr load a min or max? Should I pull the bullets and change powder or load size? Any good recipies for berrys 155 gr plated bullets. I will be shooting a xd, xd compact, glock 22, glock 23 don't know if that matters. Thanks.
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Old January 10, 2013, 06:24 PM   #2
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One thing is that plated bullets will not take the velocity that jacketed bullets will .I doubt that you will need magnum bullets either.
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Old January 10, 2013, 07:02 PM   #3
anthonycd1
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That's one thing that has me concerned. I read that mag pistol primers will jump the bullet giving more space for gas to expand and burn slower so does that mean my load is ok?
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Old January 10, 2013, 11:46 PM   #4
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My Speer manual shows 6.0 grains of Bulleye is the maximum for a a 155 grain bullet at 1.120" OAL. Starting load is 5.4 grains. I think its generally better to start at the starting load and work upward. I never begin load development at maximum powder charge.
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Old January 11, 2013, 07:08 AM   #5
delta tide
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I haven't loaded plated bullets before, but I looked into it at one time. Berry's web site states to use low to mid range jacketed data. I doubt you would have pressure problems using max load data, but the thin plating could come apart and leave plating material in the barrel. Like mentioned earlier, the velocity is the concern here (esp with a magnum primer). The same powder charge will push a plated bullet faster than a jacketed bullet.
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Old January 11, 2013, 07:59 AM   #6
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Rainier says to use cast lead data with their bullets. Magnum primers aren't needed, and may have the effect of increasing pressure. IMO, 6gr Bullseye under a 155gr is too hot, 5.0-5.5gr is the range you should be working with. I'd pull them and start over.
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Old January 11, 2013, 08:30 AM   #7
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I'm with bedlamite on this one. You are at max without the magnum primer.
Not that you can't use the magnum primers, but you should start at the bottom of the powder charge and work up.
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Old January 11, 2013, 11:30 AM   #8
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I agree with the others that you went straight to the top end on this one. I never load up 150 rounds for a pistol without testing first - you want to be sure it's not too hot and that it cycles properly in all of your guns first.

Magnum primers are absolutely not necessary with Bullseye powder, and as has been pointed out they can increase pressure for a given load. Also you made a point of saying you applied a hard crimp - that is never necessary and usually damages plated bullets. It can also prevent your cartridges from headspacing correctly. A proper taper crimp for semiauto pistol pretty much just removes the flare at the lip plus a touch more. They won't look crimped by casual glance - only a slight taper inward at the very edge. You can use calipers to check for proper crimp by measuring a factory loaded round right at the crimp area and comparing to your loads.

Sorry, but I'd also vote for starting anew. Alliant's web site is pretty weak as far as bullet choices - many newer manuals have data for plated bullets (which is usually between lead and jacketed data).
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Old January 11, 2013, 11:42 AM   #9
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1.) Yes you can use magnum primers if that's all you can get. reduce the load by 5%.

2.) Get yourself a reloading manual ASAP. Anyone that is new to reloading should read a good manual first then start loading. Never load more then you feel like taking apart if you find issues or pressure sign's.
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Old January 11, 2013, 11:37 PM   #10
anthonycd1
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Thank you all very much. This is a lot of help. The trouble I had was alliants print out only said 6 grains didn't say min or max. So I was unsure. I have Several manuals but plated bullet .40 cal data seams to be kind hard to come by. What's a good book for load data to buy? I have have a book but there isn't much on .40 in it. I have unique powder should I swap out the bullseye since I am pulling the bullets any way? How much unique? I say hard crimp but I am using lee dies came in a set of four. I think it is a taper crimp the directions said turn out half turn for soft crimp and full for harder. Think I will reflare and put soft crimp on. Thanks again all I am very impressed with this forum and its members.
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Old January 12, 2013, 01:27 AM   #11
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Lymans 49th is a good manual.
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Old January 12, 2013, 05:46 AM   #12
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Quote:
The trouble I had was alliants print out only said 6 grains didn't say min or max. So I was unsure.
I urge you to look again -- perhaps not in that immediate column with the actual data, but somewhere on each page. Top or bottom. Alliant will specifically state that the listed loads are maximum loads and should be approached with caution, typically reduced by 10% to start.
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Old January 13, 2013, 08:46 PM   #13
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Two things, plated bullets should use lead load data. I've shot a lot of plated bullets in the .40 and I'm not saying you can't use jacketed data for plated bullets, but it's best to back it off a hair if you do. Bullseye is a fast burning powder, so I'm guessing somewhere around 5.5gr instead of 6.0gr.

Second, don't crimp plated bullets hard. Give them a very light crimp, enough to get the bell out of the case and just a slight grip on it. I say this because the plating is very thin, and crimping them hard (I've done it) will lead to bad accuracy, even keyholing.
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Old January 13, 2013, 08:55 PM   #14
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Quote:
Second, don't crimp plated bullets hard. Give them a very light crimp, enough to get the bell out of the case and just a slight grip on it. I say this because the plating is very thin, and crimping them hard (I've done it) will lead to bad accuracy, even keyholing.
And, the 40 headspaces off the mouth of the case, so a hard crimp is going to cause headspace issues.
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Old January 13, 2013, 10:53 PM   #15
anthonycd1
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I pulled 50 or so and the cimp was way to hard. I am just going to start fresh and with 5 grains and work up to 5.6 or so
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