The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The North Corral > Curios and Relics

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old January 10, 2013, 06:21 PM   #1
brian33x51
Member
 
Join Date: January 24, 2005
Posts: 27
old revolver identity?

This revolver has no markings other than a stamped serial number (on the other side). It uses a fixed cylinder. Serial number is just over 1000.

http://imgur.com/lhjuR
brian33x51 is offline  
Old January 10, 2013, 08:25 PM   #2
James K
Staff
 
Join Date: March 17, 1999
Posts: 19,822
The gun appears to be a Belgian or Spanish copy of a generic British revolver. Check to see if there is an oval with the letters E L G on the back of the cylinder; that is the Liege, Belgium, proof mark.

Jim
__________________
Jim K
James K is offline  
Old January 11, 2013, 07:22 AM   #3
madcratebuilder
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 2, 2007
Location: Northern Orygun
Posts: 4,871
Quote:
The gun appears to be a Belgian or Spanish copy of a generic British revolver.
+1
madcratebuilder is offline  
Old January 11, 2013, 08:32 AM   #4
Mike Irwin
Staff
 
Join Date: April 13, 2000
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 36,239
I'm thinking it's actually French, or a Belgian copy of a French revolver, and not a copy of a British revolver.

It doesn't have a top strap and, other than Colt, the French were about the only other makers who thought that a top strap was unnecessary on a revolver, primarily because they were, by far, the biggest adherents of the pinfire design, and it's very tough (but not impossible) to make a pinfire revolver with a topstrap.

Also, judging by the shape of the hammer and trigger, and the general location of the screws, it uses the Chamelot-Delvigne lockwork design, which the British pretty much never used, but which was used heavily in Continental Europe.
__________________
"The gift which I am sending you is called a dog, and is in fact the most precious and valuable possession of mankind" -Theodorus Gaza

Baby Jesus cries when the fat redneck doesn't have military-grade firepower.
Mike Irwin is offline  
Old January 11, 2013, 09:49 AM   #5
Jim Watson
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 25, 2001
Location: Alabama
Posts: 11,284
I can't tell beyond generic European revolver.
Zhuk shows a few open top centerfires, this looks like the one he says "Probably made by Lefaucheux in Paris..." but then "...also made in Belgium."

It is missing its ejector rod. Those were exposed and flimsy compared to the enclosed Colt SAA rod.
Jim Watson is offline  
Old January 11, 2013, 10:56 AM   #6
Mike Irwin
Staff
 
Join Date: April 13, 2000
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 36,239
It possibly didn't have an ejector rod. Some of the cheaper open tops didn't.
__________________
"The gift which I am sending you is called a dog, and is in fact the most precious and valuable possession of mankind" -Theodorus Gaza

Baby Jesus cries when the fat redneck doesn't have military-grade firepower.
Mike Irwin is offline  
Old January 11, 2013, 01:09 PM   #7
James K
Staff
 
Join Date: March 17, 1999
Posts: 19,822
"Generic European revolver" is about as close as we can come, at least without further information. As to value, those guns, in good condition and functional, sell for around $100, tops about $200.

I based my "English" comment on the shape of the grips and trigger guard, but the English didn't favor topless revolvers. (Page 3 is of course another story.)

The Spanish copied everything and many of the no-name guns in the catalogs and books are of Spanish origin.

Jim
__________________
Jim K
James K is offline  
Old January 12, 2013, 07:30 PM   #8
brian33x51
Member
 
Join Date: January 24, 2005
Posts: 27
Thanks for all the replies, very educational. I'm asking for someone else (inherited pistol). After some more searching after posting this I sort of figured it was european, maybe french although I never found a match. Asking more questions the guy who had this spent a tour on the ground in vietnam confirming suspicions of being european or a european copy (if that's where he got it, that is). The serial number is stamped pretty solidly.

I'll pass on the question about markings on the cylinder.

Another shot of the other side.

http://imgur.com/KUQCo

Last edited by brian33x51; January 12, 2013 at 07:42 PM.
brian33x51 is offline  
Old January 12, 2013, 08:35 PM   #9
PetahW
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 19, 2008
Posts: 4,679
FWIW, IMO it looks exactly like a mutt German pinfire revolver, I once had.


.
PetahW is offline  
Old January 13, 2013, 12:46 AM   #10
Mike Irwin
Staff
 
Join Date: April 13, 2000
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 36,239
I thought at first that it might be a pin fire, but I don't think that it is. The hammer shape is incorrect.
__________________
"The gift which I am sending you is called a dog, and is in fact the most precious and valuable possession of mankind" -Theodorus Gaza

Baby Jesus cries when the fat redneck doesn't have military-grade firepower.
Mike Irwin is offline  
Old January 13, 2013, 10:55 AM   #11
tater134
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 22, 2009
Location: NE,PA
Posts: 390
Are there any proof marks on the gun anywhere? Are you able to take the cylinder out?
tater134 is offline  
Old January 14, 2013, 12:51 PM   #12
brian33x51
Member
 
Join Date: January 24, 2005
Posts: 27
Thanks! Currently at an empasse. Yes the owner did find an oval on the cylinder but couldn't read it due to eyesight and patina. And yes it appears the ejector rod is broken. I'll update when I get more info on the cylinder markings.
brian33x51 is offline  
Old January 14, 2013, 10:56 PM   #13
Mike Irwin
Staff
 
Join Date: April 13, 2000
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 36,239
Both the French and Belgians used black powder proof marks with ovals surrounding letters and symbols.
__________________
"The gift which I am sending you is called a dog, and is in fact the most precious and valuable possession of mankind" -Theodorus Gaza

Baby Jesus cries when the fat redneck doesn't have military-grade firepower.
Mike Irwin is offline  
Old January 15, 2013, 12:56 AM   #14
Rainbow Demon
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 27, 2012
Posts: 397
Probably a pinfire design adapted to center fire or rim fire cartridges.
Sort of like the Remington conversions of C&B revolvers to fixed ammunition.
That way they could use up parts and tooling leftover when the pinfire cartridge fell out of favor.

This pistol reminds me of a pinfire bought in quantity by the US during the Civil War. Despite sturdy construct in pinfire form the cartridge was so weak that as one trooper put it "you couldn't even kill a pig with it". He'd actually tried to kill a pig caught by foragers and emptying the pistol into it had no effect.
One artilleryman shot a Confederate officer in the head at point blank range and only knocked him out. The officer was wearing a hat to large for him so he had placed folded newspaper in the liner to get a better fit. The bullet cut through the hatband and was stopped by the folded paper. Aside from a concussion and large bruise the officer suffered no real injury.
The pinfire system took up a lot of space in the cartridge case so little room was left for the powder charge.

The basic design of several types of pinfire pistols were carried over into the centerfire designs, sometimes using very powerful centerfire cartridges like the massive Monte Negrin pistols that used a cartridge intended for carbines.
Rainbow Demon is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:26 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.08761 seconds with 9 queries