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Old January 5, 2013, 09:31 PM   #1
shoptroll
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Brownell's Acraglass Gel

Is Acraglass Gel strong enough to install a blade front sight on a barrel instead of silver soldering? I'm asking because I have the glass on hand and I've never tried silver soldering but, I'll learn if it's the best way. Just wondering if the glass works and would be easier?
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Old January 5, 2013, 11:51 PM   #2
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Good question... considering I've never used it for anything but bedding.

I don't think it will take much of a hit, but if you're careful, it should tolerate temperature and vibration well enough. Make sure your surfaces are course sanded or blasted bare metal (for a good "tooth") and completely clean.

Perhaps a better choice would be a metalized epoxy, JB weld, that sort of thing.

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Old January 6, 2013, 01:50 AM   #3
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Good point.
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Old January 6, 2013, 02:01 AM   #4
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I seriously doubt that any glue, even an epoxy, will hold a sight on a barrel for very long. That is why most sights were soldered or brazed on to begin with. Learn to silver solder or braze.
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Old January 6, 2013, 05:57 AM   #5
natman
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I've tried it. I sanded, cleaned and carefully mixed the glass, but eventually the sight hit something and dropped off. I've done it a few times since but only as a temporary measure for testing. I would NOT do it on a sight that was important to have still attached when I needed it.
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Old January 6, 2013, 07:59 AM   #6
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A while back I made a scope mount to fit a specific situation and didn't want to solder it on till I tested it, so attached it with Acraglas Gel. The gel doesn't become brittle as the regular acra-glas does. Incidentally this was not a heavy recoiling rifle. Testing was successful so wanted to solder it in place as I didn't truly trust the epoxy. Epoxy is supposed to turn loose when heated, thought the darn thing would never release. Still don't really trust the epoxy for such an application. GW
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Old January 6, 2013, 09:11 AM   #7
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I would install a sight ramp with screws . Gluing it won't be dependable , and brazing or silver soldering require right around 800-1200 Deg. F heat to melt things together . The heat will ruin the finish on your barrel , and it's not as simple as you might think . A pin has to be installed in the sight , which goes in an alignment hole in the barrel , aligning and holding sight in place while soldering or brazing . Two holes , drilled and tapped should cost $50.00 or less , screw it on , done !
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Old January 6, 2013, 11:31 PM   #8
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Hacks use JB Weld for this type of thing.

The correct thing to do is solder it. You can use lower-temp solders than silver solder - Brownells' Hi-Temp, Hi-Force 44 is a lower-temp solder than true silver solder that works well in situations like this:

http://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-to...r-prod711.aspx

Real silver solder needs over 1100 degrees F to melt. That's to the point where you've pulled most any hardness out of steel. At 645F, you're in the range where you're leaving some heat treatment in the steel.
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Old January 7, 2013, 05:54 PM   #9
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I'll look into that.
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Old January 11, 2013, 07:57 PM   #10
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Another vote for hi force 44, just pre tin both surfaces after a good cleaning. Then just befor the solder sets up have 0000 steel wool handy to strike off the extra solder. More work than JB but permanent.
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