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Old December 23, 2012, 10:24 AM   #1
gators52
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Join Date: December 8, 2012
Posts: 18
Cleaning Rod and Brush material

I've read hundreds of threads on this topic but it seems everyone says different things. I've never cleaned a gun and my first gun should be here soon, so I want to understand this topic well before I clean my gun for the first time.

Many people say steel rods are the best because they are harder than brass but still softer than your barrel. This apparently allows the rod to stay free of grit which can supposedly scratch the barrel. I can't find places locally that carry them. It seems everyone carries brass rods. From what i hear the brass rods can get grit embedded in them and scratch the bore. Then I hear about people using brass rods for 30 years and nothing wrong has happened. If grit can get embedded in the brass rods why can't grit also get embedded in the brass brushes? Also isn't this the same grit and debris that we push through the barrel as we clean it. If pushing all this gunk down the barrel doesn't hurt it why is it a big concern if this same stuff becomes embedded in our cleaning rods?

Some people swear by coated rods, but I keep hearing the rods can become scratched easily and the protective coating can wear off which defeats the purpose of paying big bucks for those rods.

Is there a difference in the brass brushes that come with el cheapo cleaning kits vs the ones you can buy separate?

If anything I said is wrong let me know, i'm just trying to sort out all the information.
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Old December 23, 2012, 10:34 AM   #2
ClydeFrog
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New Remington cleaning system; SQEE-GE...

I saw a new cleaning rod/system marketed online by Remington, www.Remington.com . It's called the SQEE-GE(check correct title).

This new gun care product removes the lead, gunpowder, gunk etc in one pass. The website has a video clip. It works on nearly every caliber from .22LR to 12ga.
I had a few Hoppes BoreSnakes. They did ok & cleaned the firearm barrels with no problems. I use Ballistol & CLPs like LPX, Weaponshield & Slip2000 mostly.
Brownells, www.brownells.com is a highly rated source for gunsmithing & cleaning items.

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Old December 31, 2012, 05:47 PM   #3
splatman
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stainless steal bore brushes

Everyone seems to be selling the Gunslick stainless steal bore brushes. Will these brushes damage the bore? I currently use the copper brushes but they are getting more difficult to find.
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Old December 31, 2012, 06:20 PM   #4
PawPaw
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Dewey Cleaning rod

Brass Brushes

There ya go!
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Old January 1, 2013, 09:13 AM   #5
hooligan1
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I use the Tipton brand rods and some brass rods, I like the carbon fiber rod because it's non embedding.
Also I like Bore Tech Eliminator, ans Shooters Choice bore solvent.
I use G-96 Spray lube cleaner, preservative exclusively on all my firearms.
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Old January 1, 2013, 11:07 AM   #6
cryogenic419
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Join Date: March 29, 2009
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You're going to get about 10,00 different answers here.

Stay away from stainless brushes, stick with either nylon or the traditional bronze brushes.

Find a rod that feels good in your hand and is appropriate for the job at hand. They sell rods in all different lengths, diameters, materials, and coatings. If all you are going to be cleaing is a .22 pistol, don't buy a rod for cleaning .45's or for .22 rifles. I prefer one piece rods but there is nothing wrong with multi piece rods, they all get the job done. A coated rod makes sense on paper, but when it comes down to it a brass rod will do just as good of a job. Any concerns about grit or whatever can be addressed by wiping the rod clean from time to time. The brushes that come with the cleaning kits have always seemed to work as well as more expensive ones for me, provided they are the correct size. One thing you should be aware of is that these brushes should be viewed as a consumable item, meaning over time they do wear down and need to be replaced.

There are a million and one solvents, oils, lubes, etc out there and almost as many opinions as to what is the best and what does and doesn't work. Its really a matter of sorting through all the reviews online, deciding what to try and seeing how it works for you. What may work for Joe Blow in Portland, OR may not work so well for Johnny Whatshisname in Miami, FL.
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Old January 1, 2013, 01:49 PM   #7
Erno86
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I would tend to stay away from multi-piece rods, save for emergency's out in the field --- like a clogged bore --- which I carry a multi-piece rod set, in my daypack; when I'm rifle/pistol/shotgun hunting.

When cleaning... run cotton flannel patches only once thru the bore {to avoid scratching} --- with Hoppes #9 or Simple Green --- not back and forth; before you use the brush.
Use copper or lead cleaner with bronze core brushes only {nylon or bronze bristles}, not steel, in order to avoid scratching the bore.

Use of steel bristles/steel core chamber brushes is okay --- but you will scratch the chamber with them --- but that is the best way to clean the chambers of hi-volume round fired rifles and pistols.
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Old January 6, 2013, 05:32 PM   #8
Bart B.
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Top level competitive shooters prefer coated solid steel rods or bare stainless steel rods; all one piece. In rifles, they use a bore guide in the bolt way. Everyone else uses what ever else is on the list of all types made that make's em feel good.

Bronze or brass bore brushes are also the norm with top level competitiors, no steel ones of any kind. Sub caliber nylon brushes make great jags for holding cleaning patches.
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