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Old December 17, 2012, 08:31 PM   #1
moisanfan11
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krag jorgensen 1898

I found a krag at my local gunstore and all I knew about it was that it was replaced by the 1903 springfield. Any information on these rifles
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Old December 17, 2012, 09:20 PM   #2
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We can answer questions, but there have been books written on the Krag, so it would be difficult to cover all the details on a web site. Generally, there were three models of rifles, the Models 1892, 1896 and 1898, and three models of carbines, the Models 1896, 1898 and 1899. The Model 1892 carbine was experimental only and never issued.

Carbines are scarcer than rifles and bring more money so many are fakes, made up from cut-down rifles. Some rifles were cut down by the Army to carbine length for special purposes and also for sale to NRA members through the DCM.

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Old December 17, 2012, 09:51 PM   #3
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Good ones are rare, and will go a grand or more, but I think they are worth the price.

If you get a good barrel, and match the ammo to the sights, you'll have an extremely accurate rifle.

Problem is, non bubba Krags are getting hard to fine. Carefull with the carbines, many have been made from rifles by bubba's and arn't worth the scrap metal price.

If I was to buy one (or another one, I have a great specifiman) I'd expect to pay between $1000 & 1500, but Ive seen them higher. Cabales in Rapid City had a fairly nice one for $1995 in their gun library.

Before you buy, check the serial number to determine the date, then check the sights to see if they match.
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Old December 17, 2012, 10:35 PM   #4
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I have two Model 96's, a Model 98, a 96 carbine and a Model 98 carbine upgraded to Model 99 specs.

They are interesting rifles. One thing that always puzzled me was why U.S. ordnance insisted on making a safety lug out of the rear lug, which is a locking lug on the Danish and Norwegian Krags. I recently handled two Krags converted to .308 Winchester where the gunsmith had worked the guns over so that both lugs bore. (I still don't like that conversion, though!)

I have read the books and some stuff I have seen, but have not seen an answer to that question that makes sense.

Another poster wondered why the Krag was adopted when Mauser used a stripper clip and a better magazine. But the Model 1889 Mauser was tested and the Army felt that having a magazine that could be replenished without opening the bolt and taking the rifle out of action was better than having clip loading capability. Now why that darned "safety lug"?

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Old December 19, 2012, 01:18 AM   #5
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please help...

I have a Norwegian Krag (6.5x55) and don't have any directions on how to remove the bolt, and haven't been able to find specific instructions, and I really, really don't want to damage anything....
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Old December 19, 2012, 08:38 AM   #6
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Right out of the Manuel.

Draw the bolt to the rear;

Lift the front hook of the extractor off the bolt and at the same time turn the bolt handle to the left. The bolt can be drawn from the reciever.

Take the bolt hand in the left hand, back and down, bolt upside down, Grasp the cocking piece with the right hand.

Draw back the cocking piece and turn it until the firing pin can be removed from the bolt.

To re-assemble:

Observe that the safety lock is turned to the left. Reverse the order of the steps of the fifth operation of dismounting.

Grasp the bolt with fingers of both hands, bolt directed downward, and with both thumbs on the rear of the safety lock, push strongy forward and turn to the right with the thumbs until the arm of the sleeve engages the collar of the bolt
Grasp bolt and cocking piece as in the third operation for dismounting. Draw back and turn the cocking piece from the operator until its nose enters the notch of the rear end of the bolt.

Take bolt in the right hand and introduce it into the reciever, keeping the extractor lifted with the right thumb,. Turn the bolt to the right and at the same time press strongly with the first finger of the right side of the extractor.

This is a lot easier then it sounds.
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Old December 19, 2012, 06:01 PM   #7
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The Germans adopted their M1888 Commission Rifle instead of Mauser's design
so we weren't the only ones to pass it up. The stripper clip was such a new idea that nobody really understood how to use. The Krag's design was in keeping with our tatctical thinking of the time-uses the rifle as a single shot with the magazine kept in reserve to repel a charge. Likewise the idea that the single locking lug would not have the strength to handle more powerful charges didn't occur to them.
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Old December 19, 2012, 07:26 PM   #8
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Maybe the idea that a single lug might not be enough didn't occur to Army ordnance, but it occurred to Krag and Jorgensen, since the Danish 1889 rifle fires a round almost equal in pressure to the German 8x57JS and both lugs bear, as do the lugs on the later Norwegian Krag. One report says that Jorgensen tried to get the U.S. to go that route and they refused, but it doesn't say why.

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Old December 20, 2012, 10:02 PM   #9
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44 AMP,
I was thinking the very same thing and having disassembled the 1898 I bought for a grandson, I did struggle with the extractor. Of course I wasn't confident in what I was doing so as soon as the good Captain posted his explanation I dug the old Springfield out of the gun safe and took it apart. Well the reassembly didn't go as smooth as it sounded and I then Googled a YouTube and its even easier than Cap said.
http://www.google.com/search?q=youtu...&client=safari
I give the 1898 a full 10 for fondle factor! After a couple dozen removal- disassembly and all I am more impressed with the design and wonderful workmanship of this splendid rifle.

I took the Krag back out today and struggled with bolt removal again today.
I re-read Cpt. Stuart's instructions and re-played the video link and removing this bolt is not that easy! I just cannot lift this extractor as easy as is shown!
I do now have a very easy way of doing this that can be done easily in the field for a quick bore check.
I am right handed,
With the barrel under my right arm and right hand under receiver, bolt fully open in detent, right thumb in action pressing up under extractor. Left hand on grip, left index hooked around cocking piece and left thumb lightly pushing bolt to the left. With enough pressure up on extractor which is a lot with this rifle and the bolt is out.
Now I will do it about a hundred more times and the next legion meeting I am going to be practicing on every one of them.
I have my 19 year old grandson removing the bolt but he is also unable to remove it as shown in the video. (this rifle belongs to his younger brother). But he is kind of in love with it too!
We have a few of them locked up in the safe at the Legion Quarters and for many years they were available to members to sign out during Deer Season. Today we use the 1898's in our unit Color Gauard.
Now I do intend on getting a historical book for this rifle, but what is the intended purpose of the detent pin to hold the bolt open?
Also, on this one, when the magazine is opened and closed, the pin cover under the magazine hatch rotates thereby exposing the pin. I feel this shouldn't happen, advise please?
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Last edited by Gbro; December 21, 2012 at 03:34 PM. Reason: Detailed bolt removal, my way.
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Old December 21, 2012, 03:35 PM   #10
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The detent on the bolt is simply to keep the bolt from closing when the gun is pointed downward for single loading or at some points in the manual of arms.

The pin under the loading door is called the hinge pivot pin, and is what the loading door pivots on. It shouldn't rotate with the door, so it might be bent or stuck in place.

Jim
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Old December 23, 2012, 02:58 PM   #11
Gbro
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Of course, I should have thought of the single loading protocol of that era.

As for the pin cover I will have to get one of the historical books and learn more.
Thank you.

This rifle is not original, it is sporterized and shoots very very well. I do have a problem with the rear sight. It is not mounted properly and I took it to a so called Gun smitH and was not happy with his work.

Now as for this rifle being changed, sporterized, what is called "Bubba'd" well it still has the same unchanged action, and the stock is a shortened original and is as beautiful as can be.
I do want an original for me, but this was something I hope my Grandson will enjoy for a lifetime.
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Old December 23, 2012, 04:10 PM   #12
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my pawn shop has an 1898 krag that is a shameful bubba gun complete with hacked up stock, drilled receiver, sights removed and barrel chopped down.

the idiots want $1950 for the thing... good luck with that venture.
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Old December 23, 2012, 04:15 PM   #13
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My dad had one that had been sporterized when I was a kid. It was a nice job and looked great. He didn't keep it long. Said it kicked like a mule.
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Old December 23, 2012, 05:05 PM   #14
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Quote:
My dad had one that had been sporterized when I was a kid. It was a nice job and looked great. He didn't keep it long. Said it kicked like a mule.
that usually happens when you take 3 pounds off a rifle, any rifle
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Old December 24, 2012, 12:17 AM   #15
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In the 1920's DCM sold those rifles for as little as $1.50. (Yes, that decimal point is where it should be!) So it should be no surprise that folks worked them over in all kinds of ways, ranging from some beautiful work by the master gunsmiths of the era to the usual hacksaw jobs.

Jim
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Old December 24, 2012, 09:34 AM   #16
kraigwy
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Quote:
In the 1920's DCM sold those rifles for as little as $1.50. (Yes, that decimal point is where it should be!) So it should be no surprise that folks worked them over in all kinds of ways, ranging from some beautiful work by the master gunsmiths of the era to the usual hacksaw jobs.
Kind of like today's Mosin's. Some day our grandkids will be cursing us for butchering the Mosins like we curse our grandfathers for butchering the Krags and Springfields................and the world keeps spinning.
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