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Old December 8, 2012, 01:56 PM   #1
eddyb74
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Check you batteries

Did some reloading two nights ago on my 650 with the primer buzzer and powder check buzzer and everything was working fine. I always know within a few rounds when the primer buzzer is gonna go off. Last night however as I was getting ready for it, it never went off. I reach up hit the switch and nothing. Pulled it off and checked the battery, corroded top and bottom. I would be willing to bet that the original batteries were in both units(9-10 years). A little scraping on the contacts and I was back in business. The battery in the powder check was fine, but it went in the trash as well.
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Old December 8, 2012, 02:20 PM   #2
SL1
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Anything that has batteries in it should be assessed at least once per year, or they can leak and ruin equipment.

For seasonal things like my boat equipment, batteries are either removed for the off-season and replaced with new when reconditioning, or, with things like clocks that at best kept moving, fresh batteries are installed for the winter.

For non-seasonal stuff, I use the daylight savings time changes to assess batteries on everything, not just the smoke detectors. That includes flashlights and other gear that is often just "standing-by" without much use.

For things that I use infrequenlty and with preplanning, like my chronograph and digital scale, I never leave a battery in it when I am not using it.

I don't have a progressive with electonics, so I am not sure what category I would put that into. Probably the check with the smoke detector group.

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Old December 8, 2012, 02:46 PM   #3
Clark
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I have designed a lot of battery chargers for medical and aerospace.

I think it is interesting that we are becoming MORE battery dependent instead of less.

Everyone wants a gas gauge on their battery.
Cell phones kind of have one.
Some flash lights kind of have one.

I interviewed at a gun sight company 9 years ago during the Iraq war. They said one could track the US GIs by the AA batteries on the ground. They never knew how much charge the batteries had or when they would get in a fight, so they compulsively installed new batteries often.
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Old December 9, 2012, 05:44 PM   #4
dmazur
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I am not compulsive. I can quit making lists any time I want...

However, I got tired of trying to remember what kind of batteries the various stuff uses, when they were last inspected, etc. so I made up an Excel spreadsheet to track them all.

Stuff that gets used rarely gets batteries installed before use and is stored without batteries. (To prevent corrosion damage)

The rest get inspected and I run a DMM on the batteries and replace them if the voltage is low or if the "good until date" is approaching. And the date of inspection / new battery installation is put in the spreadsheet.

I agree. We have way, way too many battery powered toys.
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Old December 10, 2012, 10:02 AM   #5
SL1
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We have way, way too many battery powered toys.

But, using those new hand-cranked electronic thingys would be difficult for our chronographs.

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Old December 23, 2012, 11:33 PM   #6
Clark
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I had a rack and pinion geared squeezer flash light from Russia.

I had a heard of sheep. The sound of that flash light frightened the sheep.
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The word 'forum" does not mean "not criticizing books."
"Ad hominem fallacy" is not the same as point by point criticism of books. If you bought the book, and believe it all, it may FEEL like an ad hominem attack, but you might strive to accept other points of view may exist.
Are we a nation of competing ideas, or a nation of forced conformity of thought?
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Old December 25, 2012, 01:15 PM   #7
BigJimP
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Yes, you need to just replace the batteries on all of the alarm systems on the press ( low powder sensor, powder check dies, etc ) once a year.

I lost a couple of the powder check die sensors - one to battery corrosion...and had one wear out ../...they aren't warrantied like the mechanical parts on the press indefinitely - but Dillon has a rebuild kit you can buy as well.
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