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Old December 4, 2012, 06:14 PM   #1
poline
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Case ID

Founded some 45acp brass at the range. The color of the brass is a strange off color, almost enough to make me wonder if it is brass, but not quite. As you look down on spent primer you see the letter E on the top
left and the letter C on the top right and in the middle on the bottom you
see 42, which I guess is the year of manufactoring.
Anyone on the forum run accross this brass?
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Old December 4, 2012, 06:49 PM   #2
Mike Irwin
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EC 42 I THINK is Evansville Ordnance Plant, which was operated by Chrysler, one of the first munitions plants to be set up during World War II.

Pretty common, as Evansville made something like 4 billion rounds of .45 ACP from 1942 to 1945.
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Old December 4, 2012, 06:59 PM   #3
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That is very interesting and informative, THANK YOU, VERY MUCH!
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Old December 4, 2012, 09:10 PM   #4
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If the brass you found is a dull silver color, it is not brass but steel cases that were plated with a zinc compound, if I recall correctly. You can determine if they are steel by checking with a magnet.

Evansville Ordnance Depot loaded steel cased .45 ACP during WWII and somewhere I still have a box of EC 43 steel cased empties stored. I recall some informattion that was published in The American Rifleman many years ago (1960's?) that explained the use of steel cases by Evansville Ordnance Depot.
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Old December 4, 2012, 10:17 PM   #5
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I found a box of those in my grandparent's attic when I was a kid. No longer have them, but remember it gave my dad an opportunity to explain the letters were the plant and the numbers were the last two digits of the manufacturing year. Zinc-plated steel, for sure.
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Old December 5, 2012, 07:52 AM   #6
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"Zinc-plated steel, for sure."

Not in 1942. At least it should not have been.

From Remington Arms (RA) or Frankford Arsenal (FA) where test batches of steel cased .45 ammo was loaded, yes, but from EC? I don't think they loaded any steel-cased ammo in 1942.

Steel case production wasn't fully authorized until 1943, and then only until the copper shortages that made steel cases a necessity eased, which it did early in 1944.

Evansville Chrysler and Evansville Sunbeam (who manufactured the cases for loading by EC) produced virtually all of the steel-cased ammo used during WW II, including quite a bit of .30 M1 Carbine ammo.

The steel cased ammo was never authorized for combat use, only stateside training.
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Old December 5, 2012, 07:53 AM   #7
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Ah, crap.

I just found a reference to batches of EC 42 steel cased ammo.

Here's a very nice write up on it along with a good picture (Bob's now posting here).

http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f...ased-45s-6119/
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Old December 9, 2012, 10:49 PM   #8
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Oops! Can Zinc-plated steel case be reloaded, cause I reloaded two rds
in this last batch!
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Old December 10, 2012, 04:39 PM   #9
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and before EC and Sunbeam there was Eau Clair, Wisconsin, they started with the head stamp EC, then Chrysler wanted the ‘C’ for Chrysler, EC became EW.
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Old December 10, 2012, 04:42 PM   #10
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Sunbeam made the steel cases, steel cases were hauled across town and loaded at the EC plant.

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Old December 10, 2012, 04:51 PM   #11
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"Sunbeam made the steel cases, steel cases were hauled across town and loaded at the EC plant."

I think there's an echo in here or something...
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Old December 10, 2012, 05:47 PM   #12
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Use a magnet on the case. If it sticks it is steel. I would either pull the bullet, and recover the components, or just toss the rounds if the case was steel. The most likely thing that steel cases would do is split, and stick in the chamber. Though they can cause a lot of undue wear on dies as well.
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Old December 10, 2012, 06:17 PM   #13
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Mike, thanks for the link to Bob's article. Very interesting, indeed!
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Old December 11, 2012, 09:25 AM   #14
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“EC 42 I THINK is Evansville Ordnance Plant, which was operated by Chrysler, one of the first munitions plants to be set up during World War II”

I read down to “I think etc., ........” Then I started with EC was Eau Clair, Wisconsin, then Chrysler, out of vanity wanted EC for Evansville Chrysler, EC became EW, I was thinking if EC changed their head stamp to EW, EW had to be one of the first munitions plants and about the same time as DM, UT, DN, SL, LC and TW , and there were others.

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Old December 13, 2012, 12:55 PM   #15
poline
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Found the two rds that I reloaded, with the E C 42 on them and the
a magnet did not stick to them! Not steel! Even so I think I will pull them.
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