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Old November 5, 2012, 10:08 PM   #1
4V50 Gary
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1970 film, Waterloo

The entire film is on U-Toob. No shortage of blackppowder guns in it. This was made in the days before CGI. The cavalry charges were against real human squares.

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Old November 5, 2012, 10:38 PM   #2
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If this is the one with Rod Stiger (?) as Napoleon, it is excellent. It was filmed using units from the, then, Soviet Army.
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Old November 5, 2012, 11:31 PM   #3
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I've got this on Russian DVD, what an epic! I understand it cost $100 million to make in 1970, in the Russian economy, so may be that's a billion bucks today....
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Old November 6, 2012, 01:21 AM   #4
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Yep...

Great flick.
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Old November 6, 2012, 01:52 AM   #5
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Quote:
If this is the one with Rod Stiger (?) as Napoleon, it is excellent. It was filmed using units from the, then, Soviet Army.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EwsS4v2QL-A

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0001768/

The Russian subtitles, are horded, and am amusing
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Old November 6, 2012, 07:30 AM   #6
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Yes...

In this film you can tell that the director (Bondarchuk) was directing to the tastes of an audience that was different from ours here in the US of A. He may have also been well aware that the film in which the dialogue was delivered in English, would be overdubbed in a foreign (to us) language, and that the timing and sentence structure would have to change and therefore the english mouth movements and facial expressions would need to match the overdubbing to preserve presence.

The dialogue, the facial expressions, even the make-up are at times over done. Even in 1970, we in the US appreciated things that were a little more subtle.

But the uniforms, the units, the weaponry, and the battle scenes (Accept for Ponsonby's Charge when he was obviously filmed riding something other than a horse, like perhaps a 2x10 bolted to the back of a pickup truck) are thrilling to watch.

I have this DVD and in spike of my criticism, I watch it often. It is right up there with The Caine Mutiny, The Open Range, True Grit, and The Thing From Another Planet with Kenneth Toby (Remember him from "Whirlybirds"?) and James Arness.
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Old November 8, 2012, 10:21 AM   #7
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Once it started, I just kept watching it to the end.
It was very entertaining.
The presentation seemed to lead the viewer to root for Napoleon to win the battle.

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Old November 8, 2012, 10:49 PM   #8
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Waterloo is in Belgium, just south of Brussels.
I've been there twice. A fascinating fact about the battlefield is that much of it was never developed.
After the battle, and for decades, it was forbidden to build more structures on large portions of it. The land was used for crops and pastures, but nothing permanent.
A large mound of soil was raised at the site, with a huge bronze lion at the top. Climb the stairs to the lion and you get a wonderful panoramic view of the battlefield outside the town of Waterloo.
You'll notice the lion has a shiny sack. The Belgians believe that rubbing it will bring you luck!
The Waterloo museum is next to the mound, and worth entering. There is a circular diorama of the battle; you stand in the middle and get a 360-degree view of the battle and area.
Waterloo is an interesting place to visit. Don't forget to have some of that famous Belgian beer and frits (what we call French fries, but they were actually invented by the Belgians, who call them frits).
Belgium is a fascinating country. The people are friendly and its well worth the visit.
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Old November 8, 2012, 11:25 PM   #9
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For a battlefield so much is still there

Reading Gatofeo comment about how the place is undeveloped is so true,.. And considering we are going on the 200 year mark.. It is impressive that buildings like the La Haye Sainte compound, The farmhouse where Napolean stayed the night before the battle, Wellintons former HQ, Hougomont etc etc are still there. Some look like they did at the time of the battle.
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Old November 18, 2012, 12:05 PM   #10
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Unfortunately, to create the Lion Mound they removed soil from the area of the sunken road, thus destroying one of the most important parts of the battlefield.
If you go there today you would think Bonaparte had won; the whole souvenir industry is geared to him.
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Old November 19, 2012, 12:49 AM   #11
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I do realize that different times, each culture goes through different tastes in memorials and monuments.. But of all of them, I have never understood the why of building the Waterloo Mount like that.. I understand why it is at that spot and what it is suppose to be.. But again why do something so over the top to the point of altering the rest of the place.. If Memory serves me even Wellington thought it messed things up when he first saw it...
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