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Old November 6, 2012, 05:55 PM   #1
breakingcontact
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Scope mount question

When switching from my scope to a carry handle on a flat top AR15, do I need to take the top half of the rings off, then take the scope off then take the ring bases off or can I just keep the scope mounted in the rings and remove the whole unit (scope mounted in rings) from the flat top rail?
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Old November 6, 2012, 07:30 PM   #2
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Pull the whole enchilada as a unit... then, when you reinstall it, push and hold forward pressure on it as you tighten the cross bolts evenly. Consistency in installation will ensure a greater likelihood for an accurate return to zero.

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Old November 7, 2012, 01:11 AM   #3
allaroundhunter
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Quote:
Pull the whole enchilada as a unit... then, when you reinstall it, push and hold forward pressure on it as you tighten the cross bolts evenly. Consistency in installation will ensure a greater likelihood for an accurate return to zero.
I have always been told to push back into the rail slots when installing the rings. It makes it so that recoil does not have any room to push the rings backwards.

Maybe that's wrong, just what I have been told.
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Old November 7, 2012, 01:33 AM   #4
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Maybe that's wrong, just what I have been told.
Usually, when I encounter a loose scope ring set, meaning rings are adequately tight on the scope, but not on the base, the scope has moved forward... not always, just more often than backwards.
I don't imagine that would be some hard, fast rule of physics, so I see no reason not to try it either way. I'm more concerned with the return to zero, so the repeatable stop element is more the issue in my mind.

I use torque screwdrivers, good rings and proper preparation on my own guns, so when I do run into loose rings, it's at the range or a hunt on other people's guns. It's amazing some of the stuff you run into.
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Old November 7, 2012, 10:40 AM   #5
madcratebuilder
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I have always been told to push back into the rail slots when installing the rings. It makes it so that recoil does not have any room to push the rings backwards.

Maybe that's wrong, just what I have been told.
Some rail mount rings have what the manufacturer calls a "recoil bar" Short steel bar the fit's in the rail slot. They say to push the bar/mount forward against the slot. Recoil pushes back and the bar being tight against the rail it well not move.
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Old November 7, 2012, 11:12 AM   #6
Crow Hunter
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I have always been told to push back into the rail slots when installing the rings. It makes it so that recoil does not have any room to push the rings backwards.
Recoil doesn't push the rings backwards.

It pushes the gun backwards.

Think about seat belts in a car. If you hit something, you don't stop, the car does, the seat belts prevent you from flying forward when the car stops.

The rail slots do the same thing as the seat belts, except they just drag the scope along with the rifle instead of letting the rifle recoil out from under the rings.

Attachments (like scope rings) will want to remain in place until acted upon by and outside force (gun moving backwards), so the front of the rail notch will be what actually shoves the ring backwards. It is probably possible to crank down hard enough to keep the ring from slipping forward, but it is much easier if you just push it forwards against the notch first and then lock it down.
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Old November 7, 2012, 11:21 AM   #7
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Thanks for the clarification, guys
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Old November 7, 2012, 11:31 AM   #8
Sweet Shooter
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Yup... A scope will always ride forward. The backward acceleration of the rifle on firing is greater than the inertia of the scope when it all comes to a softer stop at the shoulder. Spring air-rifles are the exception to this...
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