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Old August 20, 2011, 05:30 PM   #1
juangomez
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construction date

The issue date of the construction of guns mauser Nickl. It turns out that I think are the year 1916 by the engraving on the slide. Assuming it was in the year 1922 (Waffenfabrik-mauser mauser-werke a). It turns out that the "" is patented in the era 1929-1932. Handguns of the world according to Mauser pistol and place it in 1916. Among other books and expert opinions. That means that for years was not patented this piece? or are wrong? Or we'll never know because the guns are decades in the family. Inquire of the family!!

Last edited by juangomez; August 26, 2012 at 03:34 PM.
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Old August 20, 2011, 10:05 PM   #2
James K
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There is more confusion. Ezell shows a pistol identical to yours (No. 22) marked "Mauser Werke A.G." a name not used until 1922. So while your pistol could have been produced before 1922, the Ezell gun had to have been made in or after that year. But, according to other sources, Nickl himself went to Czechoslovakia in 1919. That would not mean an end to Mauser work on his designs, of course; they owned the designs and could certainly have continued to work on them without Nickl himself.

But another puzzle. No. 22, identical to your gun, has the "Mauser Werke" marking, while No. 29, with the modified slide and slanting serrations, is marked "Waffenfabrik Mauser". There is no doubt about the order of the markings and the date of the official change, so somehow there must be an explanation of the anomaly in the markings. No. 29 simply looks newer, and less like the old Mauser pocket pistol; yet the markings don't jibe.

Jim
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Old August 22, 2011, 06:45 PM   #3
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anomalia

Hi Jim K
If I did not read wrong.
The # 22 (Visser) is engraved Mauser-Werke.
The # 29 (owner?) is engraved Waffenfabrik-Mauser.
Both dates from the years before 1922.
But you know the explanation of the alteration or anomaly?
As you know mine are continuous and have both odd and registration.
It would be another anomaly?
Sincerely juangomez
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Old August 24, 2011, 07:52 AM   #4
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serial number o years??

when you enter # 22 or # 29 refers to numbers of series? or the years 1922 or 1929? Because Visser is serial number 22, no?
Greetings juangomez
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Old August 24, 2011, 09:41 PM   #5
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Well Waffenfabrik Mauser became Mauser Werke A.G. on 30 May, 1922. Obviously, no gun made before that date would have "Mauser Werke" on it because that company didn't exist.

Ezell uses the term "serial number", and I had always thought Mauser numbered those Nickl experimental pistol in their own series. Further, the higher number appears to have the later features. But the numbers may not be serial numbers, or the numbers could be from different series, or even inventory numbers, shop numbers, team numbers, or whatever.

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Old August 25, 2011, 07:01 AM   #6
juangomez
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"Als Schlagbolzensicherung ausgebildetes Hahn mit Visier Feuerwaffen strong" or rear

Ok, I understood.
But how can it be that the "Als Schlagbolzensicherung ausgebildetes Hahn mit Visier Feuerwaffen strong" or rear sigth safeties (as they say in U.S. a few), this patented in 1929 and we see guns Waffenfabrik already with the invention? Rare!.

Greetings to JK juangomez
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Old August 25, 2011, 05:47 PM   #7
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Patent dates are not a reliable indicator of development dates. Some companies hold off patenting a product as long as possible to avoid giving the competition too much information too soon. Others like to jump in and patent as many features in as many different ways and as early as possible to shut out competition (Colt and Browning).

That whole era is confusing, with Mauser ownership changing, new developments, a ban on production of 9mm P pistols, etc. It seem evident that Mauser was not really that interested in those guns, though no one today knows why. And there is less known about the numbering and (very) limited production.

Perhaps Mauser held off patenting a new 9mmP pistol for the simple reason that it was illegal to make such a thing in post-WWI Germany.

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Old November 9, 2011, 06:06 PM   #8
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date

gracias por la informacion.

No dejan de ser armas unicas.

Saludos juangomez
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Old October 16, 2012, 11:47 AM   #9
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confirmed

Confirmed, thanks to a friend.

I borrowed several books of weapons .... even the "Mauser Pistolen" 2008.

It turned out that the pistol is not documented in any book.

Since the system has no rotating barrel.

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