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Old October 5, 2012, 06:52 PM   #26
Bulldawg55
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1903 Colt as a concealed carry pistol

With a good holster, Why not?
Love mine!
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Old October 6, 2012, 07:38 AM   #27
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How? If the hammer is at full cock, it's protected by the grip safety, and since the 1911 has an inertial firing pin, a blow to an uncocked hammer isn't going to cause any problems, either.
Carrying a loaded gun at half-cock could be an issue, as the hammer would then be exposed to a blow, but "everyone" knows that half-cock is not a safety, and the gun should not be carried that way with a round in the chamber.
On a gun with a beavertail grip safety, you're correct. However, if the gun has the older style grip safety and spur hammer, then the force of being dropped could be applied directly to the hammer depending on the angle at which the gun hits the surface it's dropped against. Also, not everyone knows or belives that the half-cock notch should not be used as a safety and I've seen several people carry 1911's that way.
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Old October 6, 2012, 02:47 PM   #28
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If any gun should be brought back into production, it should be the 1903/1908....
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Old October 7, 2012, 01:35 PM   #29
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Does anyone think that this will ever be brought back into production?
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Old October 7, 2012, 03:53 PM   #30
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My Dad has one in .380. It was given to him years ago because it wasn't working right. Someone put some wood grips on it they made in the garage. Looks like all they had was a hand saw and file to make the kindling they called grips.

My Dad really likes it, and has talked about starting to carry it. I will tell you one thing though. My Sig P238 shoots heck of a pit better. That Colt feels punishing. Don't know how it feels in .32, but if yours is in .380 I would swap it for something else like the Sig. (flame suit on for suggesting trading away a classic Colt)
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Old October 8, 2012, 05:23 AM   #31
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Ehhh, maybe the crappy grips are the problem?
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Old October 8, 2012, 05:36 AM   #32
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If you can shoot it well go for it...now as far as keeping one out the chamber is a different story! Hope ya find something that does work though.
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Old October 8, 2012, 12:21 PM   #33
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Also, not everyone knows or belives that the half-cock notch should not be used as a safety and I've seen several people carry 1911's that way.
Yeah, I know not everyone believes it, just like not everyone thinks a gun should be carried loaded, never mind the carrying condition. I have a "1911" (old Auto Ord, so I consider it more a gun that looks like a 1911 . . .), and I broke the half-cock merely by fumbling a thumb-cock; the force of the mainspring was enough to break the half-cock notch.
A lot of drop-tests, usually on the muzzle to test the inertial firing pin, are conducted some number of feet above a concrete surface; I suspect a lot more impact energy is in play, under those conditions than a mere hammer-drop.
I recommend against dropping your gun under all conditions, but dropping a gun on a partially-cocked hammer is not a good idea, and in light of the various safety features of the 1911 that are essentially negated by carrying on half-cock, it's . . . still not a good idea. At half-cock, the gun is less safe than at either full-cock or decocked, but you still have to cock the gun to get it into action; even if it is "safe" it still doesn't make any sense.
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Old October 8, 2012, 01:52 PM   #34
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The grip safety and the thumb safety were requirements made by the U.S. Army under the elements they wanted to contract for in a pistol. John Browning did not have either in his original design. The half cock notch was the logical safety. It is just as safe to carry on the half cock notch as cocked and locked, and certainly safer than hammer down on a loaded chamber.
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Old October 8, 2012, 02:27 PM   #35
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It is just as safe to carry on the half cock notch as cocked and locked, and certainly safer than hammer down on a loaded chamber.
Absolutely not. A blow to the hammer will not impart any energy or motion to the firing pin if the hammer is down, but if the hammer is partially cocked -placing the hammer in position to be struck a blow, unlike full cock - a blow strong enough to shear the half-cock notch might very well transfer enough energy to the firing pin to fire the gun.
The gun is not as safe when at half-cock, and in fact, you effectively deactivate a couple of built-in safeties by doing so. See, that's why I said "everyone" knows.
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Old October 8, 2012, 05:01 PM   #36
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^^^^^ That is untrue. There is no less "metal" holding the hammer at half cock than with cocked and locked.
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Old October 8, 2012, 06:36 PM   #37
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That Colt feels punishing. Don't know how it feels in .32, but if yours is in .380 I would swap it for something else like the Sig. (flame suit on for suggesting trading away a classic Colt)
Everyone's perception is different, but for comparison, my 1920-made Colt 1903 in .32 feels like a .22 when I fire it. Very mild. Mine has most of the finish worn off. It looks like it has a rough finish but it's actually very smooth. Most have been carried an awful lot. I like it. It seems like a very high level of quality throughout
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