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Old October 2, 2012, 09:54 AM   #1
kraigwy
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Opening Day Speed Goat

Took me longer to get this guy then normal but still got him about 3PM.

I just couldn't get close this year like normal although they didn't seem too spooked (not as many hunters in my area as there normally is). Guess I was always in the wrong spot.

Caused me to break my rule of not hunting past 300 yards. This guy was 578 per my GPS.

I also lucked out by not messing up too much meat, I was worried about that since I was trying out my future Elk loads using 150 Interbonds out of my 270 Win. Lucked out by hitting him high in the lungs, in and out without hitting any meat.

Not a record by a long shot but respectable.

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Old October 2, 2012, 10:43 AM   #2
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You definitely "Lead the way Sir". congrats!!
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Old October 2, 2012, 11:21 AM   #3
603Country
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That's mighty fine shooting. I doubt I could have made a shot that long. That distance is even beyond what my rangefinder will register. I've never shot an antelope, but I notice that their lungs must be a bit further back than I would have guessed.
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Old October 2, 2012, 06:21 PM   #4
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They are pretty much all lungs.
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Old October 2, 2012, 08:21 PM   #5
kraigwy
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Quote:
That distance is even beyond what my rangefinder will register.
Don't feel bad, my is suppose to go to 1200 but I'm lucky to get 450 on the pairee. Don't know what it is.

Anyway I used Mil Dots figuring the average antelope is 15 inches from the top of his back to the bottom of his stomack. So far the number has been pretty close.

I figured 600, only 22 yards off.
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Old October 3, 2012, 04:07 PM   #6
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Pretty impressive shooting and a nice goat!!
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Old October 3, 2012, 04:11 PM   #7
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Nice!
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Old October 3, 2012, 04:14 PM   #8
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I guess you can call them what you will, but they are not goats or in the goat family.
Jerry
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Old October 3, 2012, 04:19 PM   #9
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Not that you need me to say it, but you sir, have real skills. Thanks for sharing.
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Old October 3, 2012, 05:07 PM   #10
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Nice job kraigwy, congrats.
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Old October 3, 2012, 06:14 PM   #11
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Nice shooting Kraig. I didn't make the trip out there this year and your picture reminded me of what great fun those trips are.
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Old October 3, 2012, 06:31 PM   #12
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Jerry M, they're not goats, their the only ANTELOPE left in the Northern Hemis.
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Old October 3, 2012, 10:12 PM   #13
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Nice one. Antelope chops are one of my favorite meals... Congrats!!
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Old October 4, 2012, 02:26 PM   #14
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They're not antelope either, but that's besides the point. And don't forget the oryx population in NM...though that's not even close to native. The goat is just a nickname, much like prairie dogs are not dogs, nor are they sod poodles, picket pins, etc. Congrats on the kill. My dad got his this year with his new ML. That's sure some good meat. I wish I could raise and eat those on the same volume as we eat chicken and pork. It's better than beef by a long shot. Problem is that the steaks are so small, I usually eat 3 or so of them. That's a long poke at a little animal. Good shooting!
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Old October 4, 2012, 07:10 PM   #15
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Nice shooting on a fine animal. I'm glad you had the skill and nerve to pull off the shot. That's way beyond my comfort zone.
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Old October 4, 2012, 08:48 PM   #16
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Congrats.

Quote:
I just couldn't get close this year like normal although they didn't seem too spooked (not as many hunters in my area as there normally is). Guess I was always in the wrong spot.
Game and Fish really cut back the number of tags this year.
The unit I hunt, for example, had nearly 1,000 tags issued last year (resident, non-resident, bucks, and doe/fawn, all together). But, this year, there were just over 50 tags. A bordering unit had about 700 tags last year, and only 17 this year.

While other states around them seems to be issuing more tags to save struggling habitat and create smaller, yet stronger herds for next year (due to the drought); Wyoming seems to be taking the opposite approach: If they're gonna die, they're gonna die. Let mother nature do it, instead of hunters.

Hopefully, next year is better. (But I don't really expect anything to improve for at least 2 years.)
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Old October 4, 2012, 08:56 PM   #17
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That sir, is damn fine range estimation and shooting. Hats off to you, sir.
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Old October 4, 2012, 09:21 PM   #18
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Has anyone actually clocked one of these ? We were driving at a steady 55 when one joined us and paced us for quite a while then put the pedal to the metal and left us in the dust ! He must have reached 75 . I see all kinds of figures but has anyone actually clocked one ?
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Old October 4, 2012, 09:41 PM   #19
kraigwy
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Those puppies are quick, that's why I would never shoot one running.

Let assume they are 200 yards away, you can't tell if they are running 30 MPH or 45 MPH.

The difference in lead would be about a difference of 5 ft lead.........more then enough to muff a shot, wounding or crippling the critter.
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Old October 5, 2012, 07:47 AM   #20
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Quote:
I guess you can call them what you will, but they are not goats or in the goat family.
Jerry
I know they're not in the goat family or goats. Everyone has just called them that for years in all the hunting magazines or whatever. If some take it as a slam against antelopes I apologize.
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Old October 5, 2012, 09:01 AM   #21
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Sweet, nice shot.
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Old October 5, 2012, 11:54 AM   #22
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Thanks Chewey I stand corrected!
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Old October 5, 2012, 04:13 PM   #23
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Quote:
Has anyone actually clocked one of these ? We were driving at a steady 55 when one joined us and paced us for quite a while then put the pedal to the metal and left us in the dust ! He must have reached 75 . I see all kinds of figures but has anyone actually clocked one ?
One of the most reliable figures available can be found in Mammals of North America (Kays, Roland W., and Wilson, Don E. Princeton University Press. 2002.).

A combined summary of the data from that book; American Pronghorn: Social Adaptations & the Ghosts of Predators Past (Byers, John A. University of Chicago Press. 1997.); and "Pronghorn: Survivors of the American Savanna" (Zoogoer. December 2001.):
Quote:
Sustained speeds of up to 45 miles per hour (72 kilometers per hour) have been clocked on captive animals running up to 22 continuous miles, but wild Pronghorn have been clocked at speeds up to 61 mph (98 kph) for short sprints to outrun predatory threats. (Kays) Several scientists have suggested that the Pronghorn Antelope evolved to attain such incredible speeds due to predatory threats from now-extinct North American predators such as the North American Cheetah, Giant Short-faced Bear (faster than the name suggests), Dire Wolf, and American Lion, since no current predator presents enough of a threat to warrant the need for such speed. (Hawes, Byers)
(emphasis mine)

It has been difficult for scientists to obtain good data for sustained speeds of wild herds, due to the logistics involved and the fact that doing something like chasing them with a helicopter will skew the data and cause undue stress.
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Old October 6, 2012, 04:37 AM   #24
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Nice!!Congratulations.

I have a Leica rangefinder but sometimes fiddling around with stuff just is not as efficient as using the reticle to range estimate.My antelope rifle does not have a Mil-Dot,but it is a 6x by 42 mm Leupold with their standard duplex.As close as I can measure on a 100 yd sight in target,post tip to post tip is right at 7 in.enough that I assume the design intent was was two mils.,or one mil crosshsair center to post tip.

With my .257 AI and 115 ballistic tips,I zero at 300 yds.The hanging post tip gives me a precise 100 yd aim point.

Its been a while since I looked at the numbers,but the lower post tip is about 425 yds.That thing is a speed goat killing machine,for moderate ranges.

So,if I may suggest,take some stew meat sort of trimmings,shoulder area will be fine,season a little,shake in flour,brown in the skillet with a little butter.I leave it pink inside.

Thats it.Enjoy!

I'm impressed that I see no cactus in the pic!!Finesse.
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Old October 6, 2012, 08:43 AM   #25
kraigwy
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I'm impressed that I see no cactus in the pic!!
Oh its there, trust me.

I'ts the Law of the West: When antelope hunting in Wyoming, any time you set, kneel, or go prone, you're into cactus.

As to ranging, I do simular only I do use a Mil Dot. This was a 270 Win, 150 Grn Hornady IBs at 2800 fps.

I normally carry it zeroed at 275 yards, its never 4 inches high or 4 inches low to 425 yards. ( the vital area of the normal antelope is 8.5-9 inches). So you aim at the center of the heart/lung area, you should be good.

The size, top of back to bottom of stomach of the average antelope is 15 inches. If you fit that 15 inches into your scope, and a 1 Mil or larger will mean the animal is in range. (15 inchs with 1 mil is 417 yards).

On this critter, it was a bit farther. I figured 600 so set the scope to hit at 600 and the picture tells the story.
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