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Old September 27, 2012, 10:38 AM   #1
garryc
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Use it or scrap it?

30-06 brass dated 1942,1944 and 1949. It cleaned up real well.
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Old September 27, 2012, 10:53 AM   #2
Brian Pfleuger
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Age itself is not really relevent. Inspect it the same as any other brass and use it if it checks out.
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Old September 27, 2012, 01:28 PM   #3
rajbcpa
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how do you know the dates?
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Old September 27, 2012, 02:28 PM   #4
m&p45acp10+1
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Raj military brass has the year of manufacture on the head stamp of the brass. I am not sure for how long they have been doing so. I have some dating to 1942 if I remeber correctly.

I concur Brian's post.
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Old September 27, 2012, 02:47 PM   #5
William T. Watts
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I have brass dating to the early 40's, they look O.K. "but" i'll never load any of them. I have to many new & once fired recently manufactured in America brass to take a chance on cases 70 years old. TMO William
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Old September 27, 2012, 03:04 PM   #6
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If you decide to use it, you should anneal the necks and shoulders. I've been shooting some bottleneck pistol ammo from the early 1950's, and most of them split when fired starting at the shoulder. (stress from forming was never relieved, and it's been bound up a long time)
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Old September 27, 2012, 05:09 PM   #7
math teacher
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Age is less important than that this is about when the military stopped using mercury in their primers which is corrosive and weakens brass. Perhaps someone can tell us exactly when they stopped using it.
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Old September 27, 2012, 05:26 PM   #8
Gerry
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Alternatively you could give it to me so that I can start an antique brass collection
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Old September 27, 2012, 10:32 PM   #9
garryc
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As it turns out, the U.S. stopped using mercuric primers in 1898. But the use of corrosive primers went on until about 1951.

http://www.survivalblog.com/noncorrosive.html

Looks like I have an addition to my scrap barrel. Better safe than sorry.
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Old September 27, 2012, 10:47 PM   #10
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Better safe than sorry, what? What do you think corrosive primers do to the brass?
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Old September 27, 2012, 11:24 PM   #11
Sure Shot Mc Gee
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Quote:
30-06 brass dated 1942,1944 and 1949.
Why bother with 60-70 year old brass with different dates and places of origin in hopes shoot it. To easy to come by newer brass these days in the same caliber. "I say scrap it, or donate, perhaps even sell it to a collector here on TFLF" Just my thoughts on this thread you've asked for. It is after-all your brass to do what you wish with it. Shoot it, give it away, recycle, its all good.
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Old September 29, 2012, 06:10 PM   #12
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I shot thousands of 30-06 in WWII era cases, then I started to toss them.

I bought cases of ammunition that came out of all places, China. I shot the stuff except for ammunition that had obviously deteriorated. I did not know then that gunpowder has a shelf life and that it releases NOx gas as it ages. One of the byproducts of NOx is nitric acid gas and that will eat up brass cases. I had cases that were pitted completely through, those I dumped. I examined all of the fired cases with Maglite flashlights and discarded those that had a pitted interior.

I shot that stuff and it shot poorly. So I weight sorted the brass and found that WW2 brass will vary as much as 20 grains. Weight sorting improved groups but it was not match quality brass.

Then the creeping doubt of corrosion came in and when the brass had been reloaded about five times I started discarding the brass. I never had any case separations but I also had received five gallon bullets of 50’s and 60’s LC, and began to load that brass.

Recently I received about 500 cases of never fired WW2 brass. I knocked out the primers, reamed the pockets, and sized and trimmed it all. The brass all looked good, no corrosion. It may be a long while, but I don’t have any reservations about this brass.

If your brass is nice and clean and you have no evidence of pitting, either external or internal, then ream the pockets, trim the cases, and use the stuff. Always watch for cracks, etc.
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Old September 30, 2012, 07:19 PM   #13
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Tumble it clean, deprime it, swage the primer crimp. and go to it. Nothing wrong with that brass. I load brass from WWII all the time that other guys don't want and toss. I'll take it any day. After loading it about 5 times it's necessary to anneal the necks, but the first few times, it's good to go.

As long as you're not going to use it for competitive shooting, the mixed dates aren't a concern. Any differences in case weight and volume will be very minimal.
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