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Old September 25, 2012, 10:29 AM   #1
rajbcpa
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Have you used Tula primers?

Are these any good? Why are they much less expensive than other primers?

Are these reliable?
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Old September 25, 2012, 11:11 AM   #2
Slamfire
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I recently ran a test to compare velocities with my standard 30-06 match load of 168 SMK 47.0 grs IMR 4895.

I have lots of 174 FMJBT's, five gallon buckets of LC match brass, so I used those and all the primers I have rolling around the reloading room. Any load I have developed with 174’s is perfectly safe with 168 match bullets.

I do not recommend the use of Federals in Garands, Federals are the most slamfiring primers around, so I am not publishing any federal primer data in my Garand, because someone may think it might be an endorsement of use.

I used the great old WLR nickel plated primers. These were made prior to 1999. Winchester changed their primers in 1999 to make them "more" sensitive and changed the primer color to brass. These brass Winchester primers have thinner cups than the older version I do not recommend their use in Garands/M1a's. I also do not recommend the use of brass WSR as primer piercing in my AR's ate up a handfull of firing pins at loads that never bothered the great old nickel plated WSR.

Tula 7.62 primers were advertized by Graf as equivalent to CCI #34 primers. CCI #34 primers are advertized as being “mil spec” primers by CCI. Mil Spec primers are the only appropriate primers to use in Garands and M1a’s as they are less sensitive than commercial primers and greatly reduce the risk of an out of battery slamfire.

Tula 7.62 and Wolf primers shot very well and I used Tula 7.62 a couple of weeks later in a match.

I have no idea why they cost less, probably due to Nationalistic prejudice. Buy all you can before they go up in price.




Code:
30-06 Primer Test


Colombian Mauser Match
174 FMJBT White Box 1968 NM M72, Headstamp LC67 match, box velocity 2640 fps 
							
14 Nov 2011 T =  68 °F					
							
Ave Vel =	2698						
Std Dev =	51						
ES =	117	 					
High =	2771						
Low =	2654	 					
N =	5						
							
174 FMJBT 47.0 IMR 4895  Lot L7889 thrown LC62NM CCI #34 OAL 3.30  	
							
14 Nov 2011 T =  74 °F					
							
Ave Vel =	2645						
Std Dev =	12						
ES =	42	 					
High =	2671						
Low =	2629	 					
N =	10						
Very good group							
							
174 FMJBT 47.0 IMR 4895  Lot L7889 thrown LC62NM Tula 7.62 lot 1-10 primers OAL 3.30  
							
14 Nov 2011 T =  74 °F					
							
Ave Vel =	2665						
Std Dev =	9						
ES =	28	 					
High =	2677						
Low =	2649	 					
N =	10						
Excellent Group					
							
174 FMJBT 47.0 IMR 4895  Lot L7889 thrown LC62NM Wolf NCLR lot 18-09 OAL 3.30  
							
14 Nov 2011 T =  74 °F					
							
Ave Vel =	2656						
Std Dev =	15						
ES =	36	 					
High =	2677						
Low =	2641	 					
N =	9						
							
							
174 FMJBT 47.0 IMR 4895  Lot L7889 thrown LC62NM Fed 210S OAL 3.30  	
							
14 Nov 2011 T =  74 °F					
							
Ave Vel =	2656						
Std Dev =	13						
ES =	34	 					
High =	2674						
Low =	2640	 					
N =	10						
							
							
174 FMJBT 47.0 IMR 4895  Lot L7889 thrown LC62NM WLR (Nickle)  OAL 3.30  
							
14 Nov 2011 T =  74 °F					
							
Ave Vel =	2665						
Std Dev =	18						
ES =	60	 					
High =	2696						
Low =	2636	 					
N =	10						
Excellent group							
							
174 FMJBT 47.0 IMR 4895  Lot L7889 thrown LC62NM CCI200  OAL 3.30  	
							
14 Nov 2011 T =  74 °F					
							
Ave Vel =	2680						
Std Dev =	14						
ES =	56	 					
High =	2712						
Low =	2656	 					
N =	10						
V. Good group


Code:

M1 Garand  BMR Receiver Douglas Barrel 1:10 twist 			
								
150 gr FMJBT 1966 Ball 						
		 						
14 Nov 2011 T= 74 ° F						
								
Ave Vel =	2545				 			
Std Dev =	20							
ES =	68							
Low =	2513							
High =	2581				 			
N= 	8							
	
	
174 FMJBT White Box 1968 NM M72, Headstamp LC67 match, box velocity 2640 fps 	
								
14 Nov 2011 T =  74 °F						
								
Ave Vel =	2592							
Std Dev =	28							
ES =	103	 						
High =	2647							
Low =	2544	 						
N =	10							
								
								
174 FMJBT 47.0 IMR 4895  Lot L7889 thrown LC62NM CCI #34 OAL 3.30  		
								
14 Nov 2011 T =  74 °F						
								
Ave Vel =	2632							
Std Dev =	20							
ES =	60	 						
High =	2671							
Low =	2611	 						
N =	10							
								
174 FMJBT 47.0 IMR 4895  Lot L7889 thrown LC62NM Tula 7.62 lot 1-10 primers OAL 3.30  
								
14 Nov 2011 T =  74 °F						
								
Ave Vel =	2582							
Std Dev =	15							
ES =	49	 						
High =	2602							
Low =	2553	 						
N =	10							
	excellent group						
								
								
174 FMJBT 47.0 IMR 4895  Lot L7889 thrown LC62NM Wolf NCLR lot 18-09 OAL 3.30  	
								
14 Nov 2011 T =  74 °F						
								
Ave Vel =	2607							
Std Dev =	17							
ES =	57	 						
High =	2642							
Low =	2585	 						
N =	10							
								
								
174 FMJBT 47.0 IMR 4895  Lot L7889 thrown LC62NM WLR (Nickle)  OAL 3.30  	
								
14 Nov 2011 T =  74 °F						
								
Ave Vel =	2650							
Std Dev =	19							
ES =	68	 						
High =	2688							
Low =	2620	 						
N =	10							
Very good group							
								
								
174 FMJBT 47.0 IMR 4895  Lot L7889 thrown LC62NM CCI200  OAL 3.30  		
								
14 Nov 2011 T =  74 °F						
								
Ave Vel =	2599							
Std Dev =	22							
ES =	75	 						
High =	2637							
Low =	2562	 						
N =	10							
Very good group							




Target shot in competition

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Old September 25, 2012, 11:26 AM   #3
plateshooter
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I have used a couple thousand so far. I like them for range ammo, but I do get some misfires, maybe 1 per 200 rounds in my 9mm and 40 S&W reloads. Using Winchester or CCI primers, I get one misfire maybe every 10 years if at all.

They are 30% cheaper than the "brand name" primers in my area so they are ok for my lead reloads that I only use at the range. I would not use them ever in my carry ammo.

My personal experience, yours may vary
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Old September 25, 2012, 12:08 PM   #4
Marlin.357
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Why are they cheaper? well made in Russia, cheaper labor, possibly subsidized by the Russian government?
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Old September 25, 2012, 12:15 PM   #5
Woody55
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I would be more concerned that they are non-corrosive. Anyone know anything about that?
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Old September 25, 2012, 02:18 PM   #6
rajbcpa
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How is Tula related to Wolf?

I shoot rimfire target and Wolf rimfire ammo is very consistent and of high quality.

Are Tula and Wolf related companies? The Tula primers are made in Russia; right?

Thx.
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Old September 25, 2012, 02:23 PM   #7
spacecoast
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I've used a few thousand large and small pistol for range reloads and they work great for me. The box says "non-corrosive" if you believe it.

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Old September 25, 2012, 04:07 PM   #8
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I would recommend that one should buy Tula primers, that way I would have more to myself
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Old September 25, 2012, 04:15 PM   #9
Jerry45
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I was using Wolf primers for my 223 ammo. Had no problems in either My AR or Savage bolt gun. When I needed more primers I couldn't find any Wolf so I got Toula 223 primers. 20 out of 100 FTF in the Savage. I tried to fire them in the AR. Still no go. May have just gotten a bad batch but I won't be purchasing any more.
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Old September 25, 2012, 06:09 PM   #10
hodaka
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Well, I just ordered several thousand SR and LP. I assumed they were the same as the Wolf brand that I have been very pleased with. I hope they work as well as the Wolf.
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Old September 25, 2012, 10:41 PM   #11
Jimro
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Have used the milspec Wolf 5.56 primers, and the Tula LRM primers. The LRM primers are nickel coated and are a beast to seat in new brass. I will definitely buy more of the 5.56 primers, and probably not any more of the LRM primers (will go instead with the 7.62 milspec primers).

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Old September 25, 2012, 11:15 PM   #12
jimkim
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I have yet to experience any problems with their LP Magnum or SP Magnum primers. I may need more data though. I've only loaded 3000-4000 rounds.
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Old September 26, 2012, 01:27 AM   #13
BDS-THR
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimkim
I may need more data though.
How about 30,000+ for me and over 100,000+ among several reloaders I shoot with of TulAmmo/Wolf SP/LP/SR/LR/.223 primers?

IME/IMO, all TulAmmo/Wolf primers have been reliable except for Wolf/TulAmmo SP primers with nickel/silver cups (some lots seemed to have harder cups that caused failure to ignite despite repeated primer strikes). Also, LP primer cups are slightly larger than Winchester/CCI LP primers so it takes more effort to hand/press prime (TulAmmo SP primer cups seem to be sized same as Winchester/CCI). If you are using once-fired or tight primer pocket cases like S&B/RWS, it is nearly impossible to seat TulAmmo/Wolf LP primers .004" below flush as primer cup will flatten instead of seating to the bottom of the primer pocket)! OTOH, if you have loose primer pocket cases, larger primer cups help extend the usable life of these cases. (Every dark cloud has a silver lining ... )

I did some exhaustive/torture testing of TulAmmo SP primers to confirm that the cups were indeed harder (on par with CCI SR 400 primers! ) - http://www.thehighroad.org/showthrea...78#post7794378

Once struck TulAmmo SP primer that failed to ignite




Once-struck TulAmmo SP primer seated in the Federal 45ACP case.



Failed to ignite TulAmmo SP primer inserted in small primer 45ACP case and struck 3 times with Sig 1911 ... NO BANG!


Last edited by BDS-THR; September 26, 2012 at 02:26 AM.
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Old September 26, 2012, 01:33 AM   #14
BDS-THR
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CCI 400 SR primer on the left and TulAmmo SP primer shot from same pistol (CCI primer detonated but TulAmmo primer did not). Can you say "hard" primer cup?



CCI 400 SR, TulAmmo SR and .223 primers all detonated using the same pistol


Last edited by BDS-THR; September 26, 2012 at 02:14 AM.
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Old September 26, 2012, 01:36 AM   #15
chris in va
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Lots of full-on duds with small and large pistol primers. Numerous restrikes just to be sure. I made sure to seat them well too. Never again.
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Old September 26, 2012, 01:42 AM   #16
BDS-THR
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If you are using Pro 1000 with Wolf/TulAmmo LP primers and wondering why you are having difficulty seating primers or why the primers won't fully seat and flatten while not hitting the bottom of the primer pocket (especially with once-fired/tight primer pocket cases like S&B/RWS); it's not the press or the primer attachment, it is the slightly larger diameter cups of Wolf/TulAmmo LP primers. If you switch to Winchester LP primers and experience less primer seating issues, YOU GUESSED IT, it was the primers!

If the primer cup cannot be seated deep enough for the anvil to be set against the priming compound, no amount of repeated primer strike will ignite the priming compound. Primer pocket depth varies from case to case, especially if the primer pocket has been modified and seating barely to flush won't always set the anvil against the priming compound. As you can see in the picture below, 4 strikes simply pushed the anvil further below the primer cup instead of igniting the priming compound (of course, this primer's failure to ignite was mostly due to harder primer cup as the Federal 45ACP with small primer pocket was once-fired and primer pocket was not modified).

BTW, I like to seat my primers .004" below flush, especially for semi-auto rifles to avoid slam fire.







In case you never disassembled a primer, it is composed of cup, anvil and seal/sealant that protect the priming compound. The color you see under the anvil is not the color of the priming compound rather the color of the seal/sealant. True color of the priming compound won't be revealed until you remove the seal/sealant.

It is the compression of priming compound between the cup and the anvil tip that ignites the priming compound. Different brand primers have different priming compound and different anvil and tip/height. Thickness/hardness of cup and pre-loading of anvil tip against the priming compound attribute to the performance of the primer. If the cup is harder as indicated on my previous post (see comparison indent with CCI 400 SR primer cup which did ignite), priming compound won't be compressed enough with the tip of the anvil to ignite the priming compound.

Of course, this is based on my limited testing, so as always, YMMV.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimkim
I may need more data though.
Some primer pockets are too deep and primer cup/feet too shallow to set the anvil tip against the priming compound unless seated .004" below flush. Of course, due to several factors I discussed, if you are unable to seat the primer below flush, you may not get BANG when the hammer/striker hit the primer cup.

Last edited by BDS-THR; September 26, 2012 at 07:18 AM.
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