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Old September 14, 2012, 03:46 AM   #1
oldandslow
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Retirement & hunting/hiking in Wyoming

Greetings all, 9/14/12

I'm getting old (mid 50's) and am looking at retirement options for the next 5-10 years. I recently took two weeks, rented a car and drove all the back roads of Wyoming. What a beautiful state. I really liked the SE corner- the Torrington and Lingle areas. I like to hike and hunt, usually 2-3 times a month. I usually shoot pistols or rifles once or twice a week and like reloading and casting my own bullets (aka boolits). The Torrington/Lingle areas looked to have milder winters and less wind due to their lower elevations (about 4300feet above sea level) and hills to break up the wind.

So my question- would I be able to keep up with my hunting and shooting hobbies in that area during much of the year (excluding winter) and are there particular towns in this area you'd recommend? For what it's worth I am presently a doctor living in the tropics.

thanks- oldandslow
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Old September 14, 2012, 05:07 AM   #2
Hal
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Don't retire....
It (retirement) really sucks big time.

I believed it would be like an extra long extended vacation,,,

No way - it's more like I said or did something inappropriate and got sent home w/no pay....
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Old September 14, 2012, 06:58 AM   #3
geetarman
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Retirement has been a blessing for me.

I retired in 2008 after 40 years bulding things that fly.

I have been able to spend a lot of time reloading and shooting. Going to the outdoor range this morning.

I play a lot of music and I am blessed to be financially well off enough to be debt free and able to indulge myself in firearms.

I can feel my physical abilities going away and have found it really does not matter. I do what I want to stay busy.

I lived in Wyoming a long time ago and it is a beautiful place.

You ought to PM KRAIGWY and ask him. He might just chime in here shortly on the subject.

I heard all the war stories about how retirement sucked and people wished they had not left their jobs.

That is not the case with me.

I am going to the RANGE. . .not to WORK.

I hope you follow through and enjoy your retirement.

I know I have.
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Old September 14, 2012, 09:29 AM   #4
kraigwy
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Hey I might know a bit about retiring to Wyoming. I retired from the Anchorage Police Department in 1994 and moved to the NE Corner. About 10 miles from Newcastle right on the SD border.

I like to shoot, I like to hunt, and I like land cruising.

The SE part of Wyoming is nice, but you'll find a lack of public land that you'll find in other parts of the state.

As to wind. Elevation doesn't have a lot to do with it. If its flat (like the area you mentioned) you're gonna get more wind. You get use to it.

As mentioned, I like to shoot. I have my own range that goes to 400 yards. Been shooting here since I retired and no problems. About two miles from my house is an abandoned gravel pit on BLM land so I can get to 2000 yards or better.

Newcastle has a pretty good club (Weston County Sportsman's Club). We have a 300 yard outdoor range, a trap range, and an indoor range for winter shooting. $25 annual member ship gets you the combination to the range.

Spearfish SD isn't too far away (about an hour and a quarter drive) and every other week they have some sort of pistol match. Great people to shoot with and a lot of fun.

I got our club CMP affiliated and I'm getting CMP GSM matches and clinics going so we have some sort of rifle matches. The club just voted to get some targets so we can have some sort of steel matches going.

Hunting is pretty damn good here. Last year I left the house about daylight and was back by 9 AM (before wife got up to fix my breakfast) with my antelope.

I actually live in the Black Hills part of Wyoming. If you're into motorcycles you'll never find better riding then the Black Hills.

To the west is the Big Horns. Best horse back riding in the world.

As mentioned, I live in the NE Corner of the state. But this isn't the only area. Before you settle, travel the whole state, there are some dern nice places in Western Wyoming also.

Gun laws are reasonable. No permit required for CC.

Warning though, Wyoming is a pretty consecrative state. Big City ideals don't float here. People trying to change that don't fair well. We just want to be left alone to do our thing.

We do have a "Sundowner Law" meaning libs have to be out of town by sundown.
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Old September 14, 2012, 10:18 AM   #5
Hiker 1
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We do have a "Sundowner Law" meaning libs have to be out of town by sundown.

I may need to move to Wy when I retire too
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Old September 14, 2012, 10:18 AM   #6
Wyoredman
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I never heard it referd to as the "sundowner law"!

Try and get away from the wind anywhere in this state, I dare ya!

HaHa.

Welcome to our humble State. If you do decide to move in, you will find that we are pretty close here. Being the state is just a hair over the 1/2 million mark in population, we tend to know each other pretty well. You will find that you can meet a complete stranger and in a few moments it will be obvious you have crossed paths before or have some common friends.

Our kids travel the whole state in sports, so if you attend a game, people will recognize you the next time.

Shooting in Wyoming is as easy as it gets. The eastern portions of the state are more privatly owned, but pretty much anywhere west of Casper is mostly public land and wide open for shooting.

The hunting in the Black Hills, as noted by Kraig is real good for antelope, whitetail and some elk along with turkey and sharptail grouse. The further west, as you get into the Bighorns and the Wind Rivers and the Absorokas, Mule deer and Elk become the major game animals, along with antelope on the high deserts along with sage grouse and blue and ruffed grouse.

Pheasant hunting is fairly poor in Wyoming, but moose and bighorn sheep hunting in the mountains is excellent, if you can draw a permit! We do have a small population of mountain goats that are hunted as a once in a lifetime lottery, but they are almost impossible to draw. And don't forget about the wild bison near the Jackson area. Someday I will get a tag!

If all goes as planned, wolves will be a preditor and leagl to shoot on site in all but the NW corner of the state come October 1. (I can't wait for that!)

And, as Kgaig said, we are who we are and don't like to be pushed in different directions. Firearms are in most vehicles and most kids learn to shoot early. Welocme to Wyoming.
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Old September 14, 2012, 10:21 AM   #7
Wyoredman
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Hiker 1,

You know how we tell that spring has arrived in Wyoming? All the license plates start turning green! Haha.

Just ribbing you. Have a great day, neighbor.
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Old September 14, 2012, 07:14 PM   #8
Ronbert
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Green license plates refer to Colorado vehicles (which have green license plates).whose drivers go to Wyoming to play.


Did you hear that one day the wind stopped blowing in Wyoming?
They all fell down.

What's a Wyoming wind sock ?
An anvil on a chain.


Seriously, before retiring to Wyoming it might be a good idea to spend a February in the locale you're considering unless you plan to be a snowbird.

And indeed, do not expect big city services and help. The state isn't run that way. (a good thing, in my opinion)

God bless 'em for going to Constitutional carry :-)
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Old September 14, 2012, 07:35 PM   #9
FoghornLeghorn
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To the OP. Best of luck to you. I'm sure you're going to love (wherever you choose to spend) your retirement.

I retired for a while. Traveled, but realized I don't really like it much anymore. (Hawaii, Mexico, etc.)

Then I got tired of watching the grass grow so I could have something to do.

I went back to school and got yet another degree, this time as an accounting major. Now I've got to get ready to sit for the CPA exam. If I am fortunate enough to get my CPA license, I hope to relocate to Wyoming or Montana, open a small accounting practice (setting my own hours and all), and pretty much do what you're talking about.

Hope I see you there.
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Old September 15, 2012, 01:20 AM   #10
Hal
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Quote:
I retired for a while. Traveled, but realized I don't really like it much anymore. (Hawaii, Mexico, etc.)

Then I got tired of watching the grass grow so I could have something to do.

I went back to school and got yet another degree,
Good on ya...
Retirement isn't all it's cracked up to be.
Watching the grass grow just made me feel like I was killing time before the big dirt nap...
You're going to have a ball w/the new career.
Working because you want to is a lot more fun than working because you have to.
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Old September 15, 2012, 01:34 AM   #11
oldandslow
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Thanks for the input gentlemen, 9/15/12

I appreciate the insight about retiring. I actually like my work so I probably will pick up some part time work (hospital or clinic) to keep busy and meet people. My medical specialty, Internal Medicine, is usually in demand in most small towns. I've got to remember to talk more about health care and less about shooting and hunting.

As for political views I am pretty conservative. When I was reading the Wyoming papers during my travels I noted one article where it was said they had diffuculty finding enough Democrats to run for political office. Right then I had the thought "this is the state for me." I prefer small towns and simple living.

Kraigwy- I spent a fair bit of time in your neighborhood. I came into Newcastle from Wright, ate lunch and then drove up to Upton and over to Sundance and then up to Devil's Tower. Beautiful country and certainly looked like a nice place to retire to.

Wyoredman- I did hit up many of the areas you mentioned. One question- a lot of the central land area seemed to be part of the Wind River Indian Reservation. Is there still a lot of non-Indian public land centrally for shooting and hunting/hiking?

To those Wyoming residents- I really enjoyed your state and stopped in all the small restaurants and guns shops I could find. Thanks for the hospitality.

best wishes- oldandslow
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Old September 15, 2012, 09:17 AM   #12
osbornk
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I retired 9 1/2 years ago at 55 and haven't regretted it for a second. When people think about preparing for retirement, they think about the money part. While that is important, I think your mental mindset and planning what you are going to do is more important. I started planning on retiring at 55 when I was 24.

For retirement, I moved to the remote mountains of Virginia into a 4600 sf house-$200,000-(near where I grew up). It has 6 1/2 acres with 2 good fishing ponds in the front yard. I have 4 geese, 7 goats, one donkey and one pony wandering around the place. My kids fondest memories of growing up was our camping trips so I bought a travel trailer for the grandchildren. I have two BMW motorcycles I ride through the mountains with other retired friends at least once a week in good weather. I have a 4X4 F-150 to wander through the backwoods. I have a 4X4 ATV to explore the backwoods where trucks can't go. I have 2 shotguns, 2 rifles and 2 handguns I can take out behind the house and shoot to my heart's content. I am an active member of both Kiwanis and Ruritan to help out children in the area.

I don't know how I ever had time to work and would hate the thoughts of going back to work.
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Old September 15, 2012, 12:26 PM   #13
hermannr
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Retired 8 years ago and moved from the wet side of WA to the Dry side (north Central WA). We have 10 acres and an 1800 sq ft cabin @ 3000' in teh Okanogna Highlands (snow all winter). Summer is spend in the "yard" trying to fireproof the 10 acres of open Pine, Fir and Larch...about 1/2 done. Winter is for play in the snow. We have a UTV (side by side ATV) for work and play. (it's Electric so I don't have to worry about driving 20 miles down the mountain to get more gas)

We have our own rifle range (200 yd) and pistol range (50 yd), and by using the attached carport off the garage as a covered firing position, we can shoot all year. Retirement is a lot of work...as was said, when did I ever have time to go to work?
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Old September 15, 2012, 12:41 PM   #14
Hal
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Quote:
I've got to remember to talk more about health care and less about shooting and hunting.
Nope - it's the other way around..
Once you retire & go back to "just showing up" (not having the demands or pressures of a full time career position), you have more time to and less pressure on you when you are - talking non-shop.

Plus - it keep s you from falling into the "old person's syndrome" of having nothing to talk about but your health.

I swear by all that's holy, that that sort of crap put both my parents into an early grave...
They retired in their late 50's - moved to AZ. & a "retirement community", and all day long they and their "old folks" cronies did nothing but talk about their aches and pains & doctor's appointments,,,,medications and all that nonsense.

Believe me - if you have a chance to talk to a patient about non health issues, jump all over it & do them a huge favor.
You're probably going to add (quality) years to their lives.
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Old September 15, 2012, 01:30 PM   #15
Glenn E. Meyer
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Don't ask for ice cream on your apple pie in Wyoming. We stopped at some small town driving through and I wanted pie for dessert. I asked for a scoop of ice cream and the waitress said that was really weird. In fact, someone asked for ketchup for their fries the other day and freaked her out.

Must have been the Children of the Corn truck stop.

Besides that the country is really pretty.

As far as retirement, not really our venue - but if you still enjoy your job and can do it - don't retire. I've seen it all. Bitter folks still on the job. Happy retired, totally bored and still hanging around work.
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Old September 15, 2012, 02:09 PM   #16
Buzzcook
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We like Northern Wyoming except Gillette which is a stinky place. The area around the Big Horns is a favorite place to stop on our way through.

Sheridan is a friendly place.
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Old September 15, 2012, 03:52 PM   #17
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Wyoming is a great state!

Well---I am one of them "greenies." I do like Wyoming!

Lots of freedom, nice folks (not lots of nice folks, cause there ain't "lots of people" ), lots of public land. No state income tax. Conservative. Nasty enough in the winter that Califonians don't move in by the train load and clutter up the state. Nice for 7 months most places. The NW corner has lots of amenities like the Bear Tooth Wilderness and Yellowstone.

Retirement just happened at our house. We have many things we like to do, and we were both ready to say to heck with working. We are sleeping better and staying busy. It is an adjustment, and lots of planning, investing time establishing enjoyable hobbies, and a positive attitude have been our main investment. We have some grandkids, and other family to visit with. We'll see. Neither of us are interested in returning to work at this point. More like, we are really interested in seeing if we can wear out our boat and catch a bunch of big fish, between her quilting and my shooting.
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Old September 17, 2012, 01:38 PM   #18
ClydeFrog
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Travel; gunlawguide.com, David Wong...

If you retire or plan to travel around the USA/Canada, I'd suggest buying a current copy of www.gunlawguide.com . It'll help you stay; "street-legal".

David Wong, a respected atty who writes in several gun press publications wrote a practical gun/knife law guide too. Wong includes the US possessions & Washington DC(including US national parks). I'm not sure of the title.

Handgunlaw.us is free & useful too. It's updated often.

Travel safe & enjoy the sights, ....

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Old September 17, 2012, 11:09 PM   #19
FoghornLeghorn
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W/some of the posts I've got to tell my story.

I was always a city boy who loved to shoot, hunt and fish.

I moved up into the Cumberland Mountains (the natives called it the "plateau.")

When I wanted to shoot I went out to the back yard and shot my handguns at my targets and dueling tree. If I wanted to hunt I walked down the hill off to the side of the house. If I wanted to fish I carried my canoe across the street to the bass pond. And I did a great deal of all those things.

But, and I'm ashamed to admit it, it got boring. Something about being able to, and actually doing, something so much, it just got old.

Go figure.
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Old September 18, 2012, 09:25 AM   #20
johnjohn
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Been ritired 12yrs. and "it ain't all it's cracked up to be".
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Old September 18, 2012, 12:10 PM   #21
kraigwy
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I've been retired for over 18 years.

If I get bored with shooting, I go fishing, if I get bored with fishing I go horse back riding or take trips on my Harley.

I became a member of the Patriot Riders and provide escorts and stand the Flag Line for my fellow veterans.

I some times just head out to Oregon to visit my kids or take my wife to OK so she can visit her mother while I clean out the turtles and bass out of her stock ponds.

I teach CMP and GSM clinics and run sniper schools for small departments.

Plus I shoot competition.

Being bored with retirement hasn't been a big problem with me.
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