The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > The Smithy

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old September 15, 2012, 09:36 PM   #1
My Toy
Member
 
Join Date: August 8, 2008
Posts: 43
Cleaning abrasive stones?

I have a number of abrasive stones of various shapes a grits. Over the years some of them have become clogged with oil and debris. I was thinking about soaking them in lacquer thinner or some other solvent to try to clean them. Is this a good idea or is there another method of cleaning them or are the stones just done?
My Toy is offline  
Old September 15, 2012, 09:40 PM   #2
Scorch
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 13, 2006
Location: Washington state
Posts: 11,428
I usually use oil to clean off the metal debris from the surface. Oil will dissolve oil just fine. Or you can scrub them with plain old dish soap and water then let them dry before re-oiling.
__________________
Never try to educate someone who resists knowledge at all costs.
But what do I know?
Summit Arms Services
Taylor Machine
Scorch is offline  
Old September 15, 2012, 09:43 PM   #3
Bill DeShivs
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 7, 2006
Posts: 7,047
No, you can resurface them with 240-320 grit wet/drt silicon carbide sandpaper. Tape the paper to a flat surface, and lay the stone on it. Rub in a circular motion. Doing this wet with detergent & water helps considerably.
Stones can be cleaned by scrubbing with water, Barkeeper's Friend scouring powder, and a stiff brush. Wear rubber gloves.
__________________
Bill DeShivs
www.billdeshivs.com
Bill DeShivs is offline  
Old September 15, 2012, 10:24 PM   #4
tango1niner
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 5, 2009
Location: rural upstate NY
Posts: 119
if you use a lot of light oil when stoning it will help prevent the stones from loading up.
tango1niner is offline  
Old September 15, 2012, 10:34 PM   #5
dahermit
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 28, 2006
Location: South Central Michigan...near Ohio, Indiana.
Posts: 3,505
I clean my stones, both ceramic and natural stones, with Hoppies #9 and dry with a rag. Nothing to it.
__________________
Sometimes you get what you pay for, sometimes you only pay more for what you get.
Three shots are not a "group"...they are a "few".

If the Bible is the literal, infallible, unerring word of God...where are all those witches I am supposed to kill?
dahermit is offline  
Old September 16, 2012, 12:25 AM   #6
wyop
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 15, 2012
Location: Wonderful, Windy Wyoming
Posts: 133
I used light mineral oil or even baby oil to keep the stones from loading up.

If I have to float out crap that has clogged the stone, I'll soak the surface in diesel or kerosene and run an old square-edged file across it on edge a couple times, wipe it off, flip ends and repeat.

The function of oil or water on stones is to keep the stones from loading up when you're working metal on them.
wyop is offline  
Old September 16, 2012, 07:15 AM   #7
My Toy
Member
 
Join Date: August 8, 2008
Posts: 43
Thanks to all for the replies; Maybe lacquer thinner is a little extreme.
My Toy is offline  
Old September 16, 2012, 01:55 PM   #8
dahermit
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 28, 2006
Location: South Central Michigan...near Ohio, Indiana.
Posts: 3,505
Quote:
Thanks to all for the replies; Maybe lacquer thinner is a little extreme.
Lacquer thinner will work just fine. It is not rocket science. There is really no need to use anything but an oil-dissolving liquid and a rag.
__________________
Sometimes you get what you pay for, sometimes you only pay more for what you get.
Three shots are not a "group"...they are a "few".

If the Bible is the literal, infallible, unerring word of God...where are all those witches I am supposed to kill?
dahermit is offline  
Old September 16, 2012, 03:18 PM   #9
Bill DeShivs
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 7, 2006
Posts: 7,047
Oil dissolving liquid will not remove metal particles imbedded in the stone.
Sometimes, a simple squirt of WD 40 will clean up a stone. Lacquer thinner will break down the oil and won't hurt the stone. There are hundreds of ways to clean them-depending on how they are loaded. I even use an ultrasonic cleaner on them.
After a thorough cleaning, there still may be metal clogging the stone. If so abrasion is the safest way to remove it, and abrasion will flatten the stone.
Hydrochloric acid will eat metal particles out of stones, but it's a PITA to deal with.
__________________
Bill DeShivs
www.billdeshivs.com
Bill DeShivs is offline  
Old September 17, 2012, 10:54 AM   #10
dahermit
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 28, 2006
Location: South Central Michigan...near Ohio, Indiana.
Posts: 3,505
Quote:
Oil dissolving liquid will not remove metal particles imbedded in the stone.
Sometimes, a simple squirt of WD 40 will clean up a stone. Lacquer thinner will break down the oil and won't hurt the stone. There are hundreds of ways to clean them-depending on how they are loaded. I even use an ultrasonic cleaner on them.
After a thorough cleaning, there still may be metal clogging the stone. If so abrasion is the safest way to remove it, and abrasion will flatten the stone.
Hydrochloric acid will eat metal particles out of stones, but it's a PITA to deal with.
Bill, I am curious. What kind of stones are you talking about resurfacing? Cheap carborundum stones? Or high-quality natural soft and hard Arkansas stones. Also, what metal are you referring to as becoming embedded in the stone? You are not using Aluminum on your good stones, are you?
__________________
Sometimes you get what you pay for, sometimes you only pay more for what you get.
Three shots are not a "group"...they are a "few".

If the Bible is the literal, infallible, unerring word of God...where are all those witches I am supposed to kill?
dahermit is offline  
Old September 17, 2012, 12:54 PM   #11
603Country
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 6, 2011
Location: Thornton, Texas
Posts: 2,248
I'm a woodworker and I spend a lot of time sharpening chisels and hand plane blades, but not as much time as I used to spend. Natural stones will 'load up' with metal particles and oil until the surface of the stone will no longer cut (remove) metal from a knife or chisel blade. They then have to be resurfaced, or you're wasting a lot of time trying to sharpen something. As I mentioned on another discussion, I moved away from natural stones and went to DMT Diamond coated stones. They cut amazingly fast and never need to be flattened and they never load up with particles. You don't use oil on them, but use them dry. When you feel like you might have too much metal dust, just wash them in the sink with a little dish soap and dry them and you're back in action. I have some really high dollar Arkansas Stones that are now collecting dust. I saw these diamond coated plates in use in a woodworking school some years ago. I only needed to use them one time and I was on the phone ordering my own. I guess they last forever. I've had them 7 or 8 years now and they are as good as new. You'd need the Medium and the Very Fine DMT plates and you're in business. Woodcraft sells them by catalog or on-line. Diamond plates are WAY faster than natural stones. Trust me.

If some of you hard headed guys are going to stay with the natural stones, you can buy the coarse DMT plate and use that to resurface and flatten your old fashioned natural stones.

Last edited by 603Country; September 17, 2012 at 01:00 PM.
603Country is offline  
Old September 17, 2012, 03:46 PM   #12
Bill DeShivs
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 7, 2006
Posts: 7,047
I have resurfaced India, Arkansas, and Carborundum stones. I don't use them on aluminum, but some steels, particularly stainless, will load a stone no matter what.
While you CAN use a diamond plate to resurface stones, they are best used on the soft stones that are designed to break down during use- like waterstones. Harder stones can eat away the nickel plating that holds the diamonds in place, particularly if flattening is done aggressively.
__________________
Bill DeShivs
www.billdeshivs.com
Bill DeShivs is offline  
Old September 17, 2012, 05:09 PM   #13
geetarman
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 18, 2009
Location: Arizona
Posts: 2,742
I started using DeGussa synthetic ruby stones many years ago. Very expensive but also very good.

They can be viewed by googling Paul Gesswein.

The finer grits can be cleaned up with an ordinary white rubber eraser. Another good choice is Spic and Span or Comet mixed into a medium slurry and rubbed on the stone with your thumb or finger.

The coarser stones will gradually lose the sharpness needed to cut.

You can restore them by using a glass plate and something like 140 mesh boron carbide powder.

The drill is to place the pane of glass into a cardboard box and cover with a light layer of boron carbide.

Place the stone on the glass and begin describing a figure eight motion and press down fairly firmly.

You will feel the boron carbide break down as the ruby is rubbed against it.

The powder will break down quickly and must be replaced.

Luckily, you do not have to do that too often.

Depending on where you work, you might have access to a grit blast machine.

That media will also work. If you are careful, you can even grit blast the stones themselves but you will end up abrading the edges and destroying the flatness and make the stone convex.

If you are using them as hand lappers, it does not really matter.

If you are using either hard or soft Arkansas stones, you can clean them just fine with a little Comet or Spic and Span into a slurry.

Arkansas stones are really pretty soft and do not cut well. They do provide a good polish.

The DMT double edge diamond files are my choice for sharpening edges on knives.

I have had mine for years and got them from Smoky Mountain Knife Works.

The DeGussa pure sintered aluminum oxide are the best I have ever used but you will pay and pay dearly for them.

A standard 4X1X.5 pocket stone will probably run you $150 or more.

Here is a link.

http://www.gesswein.com/p-10220-degu...tion=&perpage=
__________________
Geetarman

Carpe Cerveza
geetarman is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:10 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.09919 seconds with 9 queries