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Old September 16, 2012, 10:22 AM   #26
Brian Pfleuger
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I have to take minor exception with the "cannot rule out" over pressure event without pressure equipment.
Technically, we might not be able to rule it out in an absolute sense but when it happens below, at and above starting loads with one primer and not at any of those levels with another primer BUT the velocities and other indicators are all otherwise normal in all instances, I think we can (and should) rule out high pressure just based on logic.
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Old September 16, 2012, 10:31 AM   #27
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In the early 90's I had trouble with FTF using Winchester Large Pistol Primers in 45ACP shot in a G-21. Switched to Federal and have had no issues. I use my stock of Winchester for my 1911. Yes seperate gallon bags of bullets with primer listed for which gun. Using the same for small pistol, Federal for Glocks, Winchester for wheel guns.
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Old September 16, 2012, 10:53 AM   #28
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I think some of the piercing issue came from me and my ABNORMAL caliber. When I had the Federal primers pierce and the CCI not, this was with the large pistol primers IN A CALIBER THAT NEEDS small. Large primers can take less psi before flowing or piercing then small. In my case I was putting the pistol primers ABOVE their limits,CCI just took more than the Federal, but like I said, this is above the design perameters. I had to switch to rifle primers to end the issues.
I have used Federal primers in all of my other calibers at one time or another and never had an issue with them. If you ever have a pierced primer,no matter what brand in any standard caliber it is 1) beyond specs in that caliber, 2)malfuntioning firing pin,.
You have nothing to worry about using those Federal primers.
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Old September 16, 2012, 11:17 AM   #29
Brian Pfleuger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dunerjeff View Post
If you ever have a pierced primer,no matter what brand in any standard caliber it is 1) beyond specs in that caliber, 2)malfuntioning firing pin,.
You have nothing to worry about using those Federal primers.
Unless 357sig is considered non-standard or abnormal, this simply isnt true.
I used Federal primers in a brand new Glock (under 500 rounds) that did and still functions perfectly, that had never before or ever since pierced any primer except Federal. It pierces, craters and mushrooms both standard and magnum Federal SP primers, at any and all load levels, but has no problems with any other brand I've used, in factory ammo or my reloads at any power level.
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Old September 16, 2012, 02:03 PM   #30
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Thats a first for me to hear that, I have a .357Sig barrel for my XDm and I have used lots of Federal in them, Mostly the Match ones because I had boughten a case of them. Then I got a case of the standard sp's.Now a couple cases of CCI,since I was testing. I don't know what to say about yours piercing,because I haven't had that. Sharper firing pin ?
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Old September 16, 2012, 02:07 PM   #31
Brian Pfleuger
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I do wonder if the unusual shape of the Glock firing pin might contribute to the issue.
Some of the Federals I have are match primers, I think it's the magnums but I'm not positive.
I'll check later.
I'll have to run a test again and show what happens. IIRC, I was piercing like 1 of 4 or so at low levels and increasing to nearly all at mid-range loads, which is where I stopped.
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Old September 16, 2012, 02:56 PM   #32
dunerjeff
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I just went into my reloading room and grabbed some sized Sig brass(Speer) and grabbed a box Federal Gold Medal SPP and primed a handful, trickled out 12gr.AA#9 and put 125grfp Rainiers on top, loaded them into my XDm and went out and annoyed my neighbors. Here are my empties. I would say if you know anyone else with a Sig have them try them. I wouldn't doubt that the Feds are near the max in the Sig,and all it takes is that little bit to go over the top. I would think for Federal to sell them to the public they should be rated to take the pressures in all the Pistol calibers that they fit. I could also be wrong on that one,though
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Old September 16, 2012, 03:04 PM   #33
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Quote:
If you ever have a pierced primer,no matter what brand in any standard caliber it is 1) beyond specs in that caliber, 2)malfuntioning firing pin,.
You have nothing to worry about using those Federal primers.
That's a negative.
Some cartridge run pressure levels that are higher than what a "standard" primer can handle.

Example:
.327 Federal Magnum - Maximum average pressure: 45k PSI
If you run small pistol primers, and even some brands of small pistol magnum primers; you'll get pierced primers, before reaching maximum recommended pressure. To prevent piercing, small rifle primers should be used.
(Again - SAAMI's figures are recommended. They aren't set in stone. Even for manufacturers and load data publishers, adherence to SAAMI figures is voluntary, not mandatory.)


In the world of reloading, generalized rules are almost never a good idea. There are always exceptions to the 'rules', and usually... quite a few of them.
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Old September 16, 2012, 03:32 PM   #34
dunerjeff
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Ya your right, SOME of those calibers can be too high, my comment was more geared toward common cartridges, 327 fed magnum isn't hardly common.
Same with my .40Super cal. it's spec is for pistol primers, but rifle primers are needed.
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Old September 16, 2012, 06:32 PM   #35
FrankenMauser
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Ya your right, SOME of those calibers can be too high, my comment was more geared toward common cartridges, 327 fed magnum isn't hardly common.
I can walk into 4 local shops, the local Cabela's, or the local Sportsman's Warehouse, and buy any one of the three to six .327 Federal revolvers they have in stock. In addition, I can choose ammunition from any of the 2 to 5 loads they keep in stock, at all of those places except Sportsman's. (Sportsman's doesn't carry any .327 Federal ammo, except the price-gouged $35/box Buffalo Bore 130 gr load.) All of that ammunition, and all of those revolvers are manufactured in adherence to SAAMI recommendations.

I believe that more than qualifies it as both "common" (your last post) and "standard" (your previous post).
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Old September 16, 2012, 06:42 PM   #36
dunerjeff
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Wow, you win.
I have yet to see a .327 in my area, maybe in your neck of the US they are common.
But why such a big deal over one little comment????
Never mind this is pointless.
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Old September 16, 2012, 07:02 PM   #37
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FM gets defensive with the .327 Federal,

Range master at the outdoor range I was at yesterday told me to give him my price when he heard about, saw, and subsequently shot my Mag-na-Ported .327 Federal GP-100. (but it left with me!)
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Old September 16, 2012, 07:06 PM   #38
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I think you are both right- .327 mag is an established caliber that has lasted and maintained itself in all viable reloading manuals for good reason, but it is also an extremely unique, specialized and particularly challenging cartridge to load for.

What happens to a particular primer when it touches off a 45K psi .327 round is of minor importance to someone shooting a .38 WC rounds at 8-10K psi.

Agreed?
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Old September 16, 2012, 07:09 PM   #39
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If you are trying to get me to agree that we are drifting off topic... perhaps, but I'm not all too concerned about it, and I addressed the topic in previous posts.

If you want me to agree with all you wrote, I've got a problem with this part:
Quote:
particularly challenging cartridge to load for
...in reference to the .327 Federal Magnum.

Beyond getting the brass and chasing down appropriate slugs, there's nothing about it that's challenging in any way I can imagine. It's like loading slim .357 Magnums.
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Old September 16, 2012, 07:24 PM   #40
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Dont underestimate your own reloading skills and experience, Sevens.

As a relatively new reloader with around 10K quality cartridges under my belt I do not consider .327 mag to be a "routine" cartridge, skill-wise. Same with .357, .41, .44 or any Magnum cartridge. Magnums are named that for a reason, they are exceptional cartridges that require a particular skill to shoot or load for.

Either way, this isnt my battle, I just felt like both of you were making valid points and thought I would point it out.

Happy shooting
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Old September 16, 2012, 07:30 PM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by valleyforge.1777 View Post
I'm reloading 9 mm ammo with once-fired brass, Win 231 powder, and 115 grain FMJ bullets. I have always used Winchester WSP small pistol primers, but can't find any of them anywhere now. Seems everyone is sold out. I did get some Federal blue box (regular old Federal, not the match primers) small pistol primers. Has anyone had any trouble with these?

Are the Federals harder to seat than Winchester?

Any other problems I should know about before hitting the bench to do some reloading?

Thanks,
D. Valley
I'm using them right noe same set up as u but 124gr instead of 115gr .... no issues they work great

Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 2
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Old September 16, 2012, 10:55 PM   #42
Sevens
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Quote:
Magnums are named that for a reason, they are exceptional cartridges that require a particular skill to shoot or load for.
Magnums are named magnums as a marketing tool. The .32 H&R "magnum" is a pipsqueak round and unless you hotrod it and go outside the lines (many have), it's like loading .38 Special. Which is like loading .357 Magnum. Which is like loading .327 Federal or .44 Magnum.

Rifle loading for accuracy is a outrageously more complicated and difficult to fine-tune than any of the cartridges we've mentioned thus far.

Want to get in to complicated or skill-testing handgun rounds to load at the bench? 5.7x28 is a good candidate. .357 Sig, perhaps, has a few angles that are different than straight-wall revolver rounds. .25 Auto is probably a fun one to deal with, I'd guess.

.327 Federal may not be widely popular and known, but the level of difficulty is much less than loading the cartridge most similar to it in world--.30 Carbine. (which I load for handgun) Much less difficult than .30 Carbine.
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