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Old September 4, 2012, 03:41 PM   #1
paradoxbox
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Not a gun, but might be similar - handcuff ratchet stiff - "trigger job"?

I have a set of peerless 700 handcuffs which I bought new. The ratchet mechanism is extremely stiff. Using them for training is difficult because the amount of pressure required to get the cuffs on ends up hurting my training partners - we're talking big bruises on the bone just to get the cuffs on.

Does anyone know how to deal with this? I have read somewhere on the internet that handcuffs can be given the same treatment as a firearm trigger but I've never done a trigger job so I'm not sure what's involved precisely, just how much material are you supposed to remove etc..
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Old September 4, 2012, 04:53 PM   #2
James K
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Since the handcuffs can't be taken apart, I am not sure how you can work on them except to smooth down the ratchet some. Working on the pawl spring would do what you want, but you can't get to that unless you ruin a set of cuffs and then use them only for training.

I suggest using some wood or plastic (tongue depressors taped on?) to pad the wrists of your training partmers. (Of course the person being arrested won't have that benefit, but he likely doesn't deserve it.)

If the cuffs you are using are noticeaby stiffer than others carried by the officers in your department, then return them to Peerless.

Jim
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Old September 4, 2012, 05:10 PM   #3
paradoxbox
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Thanks for the post.

Just to clarify - I am not a police officer, don't want to sound like I'm claiming to be one, handcuffs are just included in the training of a martial art I do. There are some LEO's in the class.

Maybe someday if I leave Japan I'll join the police force. Til then, just a regular guy.

The cuffs don't seem to be much stiffer than other peerless cuffs, I have also heard on the internet that other people dislike the stiffness of the peerless cuffs, but I chose them over smith and wessons because I like the double locking system more.

Maybe I should buy some of those pink fuzzy cuffs from an adult shop
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Old September 4, 2012, 08:47 PM   #4
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OK, I thought you were a LEO. Yes, when cuffs are put on quick, it hurts like heck. How did the LEOs in your class train? Maybe they have some suggestions. It has been many years since I had a badge so maybe they do things differently now, kind and gentle or something.

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Old September 5, 2012, 03:34 AM   #5
paradoxbox
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We all train very hard, but these days LEO's need to be very careful because of nerve damage lawsuits that resulted from poor handcuffing technique. There was a case of a neurosurgeon who lost his ability to do surgery after being mistakenly identified as a car thief and then cuffed..! Big lawsuit.
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Old September 5, 2012, 06:02 AM   #6
Sport45
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Dry firing works wonders for smoothing up a trigger. Can you wear the cuffs in by repeatedly cuffing the handle of an exercise bike or something?
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Old September 6, 2012, 03:06 PM   #7
James K
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I don't think that "dry firing" would work. The ratchet spring in handcuffs is not going to weaken any by being "worked", nor can I think of any way to get to it without effectively destroying the cuffs. Paradoxbox points out a very real problem and if you do harm someone, you will be worse off than an LEO since you won't have a political jurisdiction to back you.

I suggest you reevaluate what you are trying to do and see whether you need to use real (or any) handcuffs. If you decide to continue, you better get a lawyer to draw up a consent agreement for your students to sign. I don't know what your legal status is (are you covered by a SOFA?) but if you are subject to Japanese law, you better make sure your fanny is covered all around or you could see prison time if something goes wrong.

Jim
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Old September 6, 2012, 11:52 PM   #8
4V50 Gary
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At the academy, we sat up and watched TV, shot the breeze, talked guns or school and all the while we worked our cuffs in by pushing the single strand through the double strand repeatedly. This help wear down the stiffness and made it easier to slap the cuffs on someone faster.
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Old September 8, 2012, 12:06 PM   #9
drail
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Lots of cheap handcuffs on the market because - the people buying them really don't care. Stiff lock springs ensure they won't pop open and take a little more effort to pick open. Wouldn't want to be the manufacturer and have a bunch of returns because the cuffs wouldn't stay locked. If built with light spring action they wouldn't hold up reall well in the real world. I think your problem is banging them on the wrist to place them on a suspect. Bang anything made of steel on a human wrists and you can do damage. Use a little less force.
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